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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Constantinian Era ▸ Constantine the GreatView Options:  |  |  | 

Constantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Flavius Valerius Constantinus, Constantine the Great, was the son of Helena and the First Tetrarchic ruler Constantius I. Constantine is most famous for his conversion to Christianity after the battle of the Milvian Bridge where he defeated emperor Maxentius. Before the battle, he saw the words "In Hoc Signo Victor Eris" (By this sign you shall conquer) emblazoned on the sun around the Chi Rho, the symbol of Christianity. After placing this Christogram on the shields of his army, he defeated his opponent and thus ruled the empire through divine providence. He also shifted the capital of the empire to Constantinople, establishing the foundation for an Empire that would last another 1000 years. He died in 337 and his sons divided the Roman territories.


The Pattern of Bronze Coinage Under Constantine I

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Doris Stockwell Memorial Papers no. 3., reprinted from the "Numismatic Chronicle" 6th Series, Vol XVII.
BL13072. The Pattern of Bronze Coinage Under Constantine I by J. P. C. Kent, Ph.D., 1957, 77 pages, 8 plates, paperback; $14.00 (€11.90)
 


The Coins Of Constantine The Great

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Difficult to find and desirable to the Constantine the Great coin collector.
BK12752. The Coins Of Constantine The Great by Stephan Milchev, hardcover, published by Abritus, Sofia, Bulgaria, 2007, color illustrated, hardcover, 299 pages, 819 coins, images from the internet, used, very good condition; $200.00 (€170.00)
 


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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RL85185. Billon follis, RIC VII Siscia 15 (R2), SRCV IV15940, Cohen VII 289 corr. (rev. misdescribed), Hunter V 244 var. (1st officina), Choice EF, well centered, nice green patina, a few tiny spots of corrosion, weight 3.309 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 315 - 316 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for paludamentum on left shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand presenting wreath, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle at feet on left facing left with head turned back right and wreath in beak, E right, •SIS• in exergue; scarce; $130.00 (€110.50)
 


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On 3 February 313, Constantine the Great and co-emperor Licinius met at a conference in Mediolanum (modern Milan). They issued the Edict of Milan, which established a policy of religious freedom for all, ending the persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire.
RL85187. Billon follis, RIC VII Siscia 7 (R2), Cohen VII 288, SRCV IV 15940, Hunter V 237 var. (...P F AVG), EF, sharp detail, nice green patina, weight 3.395 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 313 - 315 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing facing, head left, nude but for chlamys on left shoulder, Victory on globe and offering wreath in right hand, long scepter in left hand, eagle left with head turned back right and wreath in beak at feet to left, A right, SIS in exergue; scarce; $125.00 (€106.25)
 


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On 1 March 317, Constantine and Licinius elevated their sons Crispus, Constantine II (still a baby) and Licinius II to Caesars. After this arrangement, Constantine ruled the dioceses Pannonia and Macedonia, and established his residence at Sirmium, from where he prepared a campaign against the Goths and Sarmatians.
RT85190. Billon follis, Hunter V 276 (also 5th officina), RIC VII Thessalonica 19 (R1), SRCV IV 15942, Cohen VII 290 corr. (rev. misdescribed), Choice EF, well centered, green patina, some reverse die wear, tiny spots of corrosion, weight 3.460 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 317 - 318 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONS-ERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for paludamentum on left shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand presenting wreath, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle at feet on left facing left with head turned back right and wreath in beak, •TS•E• in exergue; scarce; $100.00 (€85.00)
 


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On 8 October 314, at the Battle of Cibalae, Constantine defeated Licinius near Colonia Aurelia Cibalae (modern Vinkovci, Croatia). Licinius was forced to flee to Sirmium and lost all of the Balkans except for Thrace. The two Augusti initiated peace negotiations, but they failed and they would not make peace until 1 March 317.
RL85191. Billon follis, RIC VII Ticinum 21 (R1), SRCV IV 16087, Cohen VII 536, cf. Hunter V 139 (TT•, 314 A.D.), Choice EF, nice portrait and reverse style, green patina, weight 3.279 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 314 - 315 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INVI-C-TO COMITI, Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, celestial globe in left hand, star in left field, T•T in exergue; rare; $120.00 (€102.00)
 


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Constantiniana Dafne was likely a castle or camp (castrum) Dafne, constructed by Constantine on the bank of the Danube.
RL84951. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Constantinople 35, LRBC I 996, SRCV IV 16191, VF, green patina, well centered and struck, scratches and marks, weight 3.182 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 328 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONSTANTINIANA DAFNE, Victory seated left on cippus, head right, palm frond in each hand, trophy and captive before, CONS in exergue, E left; scarce; $80.00 (€68.00)
 


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On 25 July 315, The Arch of Constantine was completed near the Colosseum at Rome to commemorate Constantine's victory over Maxentius at the Milvian Bridge. As part of the ceremony Constantine was expected to make a sacrifice to Rome's traditional gods, but he refused to do so.
RT84695. Billon follis, Hunter V 189 (also 3rd officina), RIC VII Rome 33, SRCV IV 16098, Cohen VII 536,, VF, excellent portrait, weight 2.932 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 315o, 3rd officina, Rome mint, 315 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI (to the unconquered Sun, minister [of the Emperor]), Sol standing half left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, S - F flanking at sides, RT in exergue; $80.00 (€68.00)
 


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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84284. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 63 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, Choice EF, well centered and struck, traces of silvering, edge cracks, some die wear, weight 3.199 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, PTR crescent in exergue; $90.00 (€76.50)
 


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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84285. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 65 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, aEF, well centered and struck, light porosity, edge split and edge crack, weight 2.792 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, STR crescent in exergue; $75.00 (€63.75)
 










OBVERSE LEGENDS

AVGVSTVS
CONSTANTINVSAG
CONSTANTINVSAVG
CONSTANTINVSFILAVGG
CONSTANTINVSMAXAVG
CONSTANTINVSMAXPFAVG
CONSTANTINVSNC
CONSTANTINVSNOBC
CONSTANTINVSNOBCAES
CONSTANTINVSPFAVG
DVCONSTANTINVSPTAVGG
FLVALCONSTANTINVSFILAVG
FLVALCONSTANTINVSNC
FLVALCONSTANTINVSNOBC
FLVALCONSTANTINVSNOBCAES
IMPCONSTANTINVSAVG
IMPCONSTANTINVSPFAVG
IMPCONSTNTINVSMAXAVG


REFERENCES

Bastien, P. Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon, De la Réforme Monétaire de Dioclétien à la fermeture temporaire de l'Atelier en 316 (294 - 316). Numismatique Romaine XI. (Wetteren, 1980).
Bastien, P. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon. De la réouverture de l'atelier en 318 à la mort de Constantin (318 - 337). Numismatique Romaine XIII. (Wetteren, 1982).
Bruun, P. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VII, Constantine and Licinius A.D. 313 - 337. (London, 1966).
Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Carson, R., H. Sutherland & J. Kent. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VIII, The Family of Constantine I, A.D. 337 - 364. (London, 1981).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les émissions monétaires d'Arles (4th -5th Siècles). Moneta 6. (Wetteren, 1996).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Dioclétien a Constantin I (284 - 337). (Wetteren, 1995).
Failmezger, V. Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity, 294 - 364 A.D. (Washington D.C., 2002).
King, C. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Milchev, S. The Coins of Constantine the Great. (Sophia, 2007).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 2011).
Speck, R. & S. Huston. Constantine's Dafne Coinage at Constantinople. (San Francisco, 1992).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Voetter, O. Die Münzen der romischen Kaiser, Kaiserinnen und Caesaren von Diocletianus bis Romulus: Katalog der Sammlung Paul Gerin. (Vienna, 1921).

Catalog current as of Thursday, December 14, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Constantine the Great