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Roman Empire, Anonymous, Domitian to Antoninus Pius, c. 81 - 161 A.D.

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Minerva was the Roman virgin goddess of wisdom, trade, medicine, defense, magic, and the arts: music, poetry, weaving, and crafts. She was born from the head of Jupiter. The Romans equated her with the Greek goddess Athena. She is often depicted with her sacred creature, an owl, which symbolizes her connection to wisdom.
RB91944. Copper quadrans, RIC II p. 216, 8; Cohen VIII p. 268, 7 var. (owl right); SRCV I 2918 var. (same), VF, dark green patina, earthen deposits, scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.568 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 138 - 161 A.D.; obverse helmeted bust of Minerva right; reverse owl standing slightly left, head facing, wings closed, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $70.00 (€61.60)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D.

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Constantia is the personification consistency. On Roman coinage, she is found only on coins struck under Claudius. A typical example of the fabricated propaganda on Roman coinage, consistency was a characteristic that Claudius lacked. His biographer Suctonius said of him, "In the faculties of reflection and discernment, his mind was remarkably variable and contrasted, he being sometimes circumspect and sagacious; at others inconsiderate and hasty, often frivolous and as though he were out of his wits."
RB91945. Copper as, RIC I 111, BMCRE I 199, BnF II 226, Cohen I 14, SRCV I 1857, F, green patina, scrapes and bumps, earthen deposits, weight 10.604 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome(?) mint, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head left; reverse CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI (consistency of the emperor), Constantia in military dress, standing left, raising right hand, vertical spear in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $80.00 (€70.40)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Serdica, Thrace

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Serdica prospered under Rome. Turrets, protective walls, public baths, administrative and cult buildings, a civic basilica and a large amphitheater were built. When Diocletian divided Dacia into Dacia Ripensis (on the banks of the Danube) and Dacia Mediterranea, Serdica became the capital of Dacia Mediterranea. The city was destroyed by the Huns in 447, but was rebuilt by Justinian and surrounded with great fortress walls whose remnants can still be seen today. Although also often destroyed by the Slavs, the town remained under Byzantine dominion until 809. Serdica is today Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria.
RP91960. Bronze AE 29, Unpublished obverse legend variety; H-J Serdica 12.18.46.2 (R6) var., Ruzicka Serdica 365 var., Varbanov III 2464 (R5) var. (all ...AVP SEVH...), F, porous, edge crack, central depressions, weight 14.918 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 0o, Serdica mint, obverse AVT K M AVPH CEVH ANTΩEINOC, laureate bearded head right; reverse OVΛΠIAC CEP-∆I-KHC (the last three letters in exergure), tetrastyle temple of Asklepios, statue of Asklepios standing in center holding snake entwined staff, coiled snake in pediment; rare; $100.00 (€88.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Neocaesarea, Pontus

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Niksar has been ruled by the Hittite, Persian, Greek, Pontic, Roman, Byzantine, Danishmend, Seljuk and Ottoman Empires. It was known as Cabira in the Hellenistic era. In 72/71 B.C., during the Third Mithridatic War, the Romans took the city in the Battle of Cabira. Pompey made it the metropolis Diopolis. Pythodoris, widow of Polemon, made it her capital and called it Sebaste. It is uncertain when it took the name of Neokaisareia, first mentioned in Pliny, "Hist. Nat.", VI, III, 1. Judging from its coins, it was probably during the reign of Tiberius. In 344 the city was completely destroyed by an earthquake but recovered. Neokaisareia became part of the Eastern Roman Empire when the Roman Empire divided in 395. Another earthquake occurred in 499.
RP91968. Bronze tetrassarion, SNGvA 99 corr. (date PMB), SNG Hunterian 1154, Rec Gén 13, BMC Pontus - (same rev. type as p. 33, 7 for Caracalla), SNG Cop -, Lindgren -, gF, brown patina, some light deposits, weight 11.362 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 45o, Pontus, Neocaesarea (Niksar, Turkey) mint, 209 - 210 A.D.; obverse AY K Λ CEΠ CEOYEIPOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse KOIN ΠON NEO-KAI MHTPO, Tetrastyle temple, statue of nude male figure on pediment in center, ET PMς (year 146, Mς appears as ligate MR); $70.00 (€61.60)


Celtic, Ring Money, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
CE91970. Bronze Ring Money, plain ring, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15, VF, weight 7.729 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, found in southern Spain; $35.00 (€30.80)


Celtic, Ring Money, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
CE91971. Bronze Ring Money, plain ring, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15, VF, weight 5.945 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, found in southern Spain; $35.00 (€30.80)


Celtic, Ring Money, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
CE91972. Bronze Ring Money, plain ring, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15, VF, weight 6.207 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, found in southern Spain; $35.00 (€30.80)


Celtic, Ring Money, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
CE91973. Bronze Ring Money, plain ring, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15, VF, weight 5.962 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, found in southern Spain; $35.00 (€30.80)


English Hammered Lot, 36 Coins and Coin Fragments, c. 1325 - 1610

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Consignor notes (unverified): 1) Edward III, 1/2 penny (0.42g) London, 1344-1351, S1557, aF. 2) Possibly Edward III, penny, Canterbury, Fair, edge cut. 3) Edward III, penny (0.97g) Durham, pre-treaty, aF. 4) Edward III, c. 1370 penny, aF. 5-6) cut half penny. 7-8) cut farthings, F. 9) Edward IV, twopence, broken in two and repaired, flan crack, F. 10) Uncertain 15th century penny, Fair. 11) Similar, Poor / aF, chipped. 12) Similar halfpenny, Fair. 13) cut penny, Fair. 14) Henry VII, groat, (1.68g) Profile bust, S2254, aF, clipped. 15) Edward VI, fragmentary base sixpence, S2483, Poor. 16) Elizabeth, penny (0.38g) London, S2570. aF. 17) Elizabeth, threepence, 156_, Fair. 18-25) Similar, one holed and chipped, another chipped. 26-30) Similar twopences, one holed. 31) Similar penny, small hole. 32-36) Elizabeth, sixpences, all damaged included two with severe chips.
LT91974. Silver Lot, 36 English hammered coins and coin fragments, c. 1325 - 1610, unattributed, no tags or flips, the lot is the actual coins in the photograph, some only identifiable by a maven, bulk lot, as-is, no returns; $360.00 (€316.80)


Great Britain, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

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The British farthing (derived from the Old English feorthing, a fourth part) was worth a quarter of an old penny (1/960 of a pound sterling). It ceased to be struck after 1956 and was demonetized from 1 January 1961.

1860 mintage: approximately 2,867,200 (including all varieties); designer: Leonard Wyon.
UK91914. Bronze farthing, SCBC 3958; bun head, tooth, five berry variety, aEF, some marks, plain edge, weight 2.798 g, maximum diameter 20 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1860; obverse VICTORIA D: G: BRITT: REG: F: D. (Victoria, by the grace of God, Queen of the British Territories, Defender of the Faith), laureate and draped bust of Queen Victoria left, hair in a bun, wreath of 15 leaves and 5 berries, tiny L C WYON on drapery at shoulder, toothed border with linear circle; reverse FARTHING, Britannia seated right on rocks, helmeted, right hand resting on Union shield at side, trident in left hand, in the background a lighthouse to the left, and ship to the right, tiny 1860 below, toothed border with linear circle; $25.00 (€22.00)




  







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