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Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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The "Eastern" mint denarii of Hadrian are all rare. BMCRE vol. II, pp. 372-81, ppl. 68-71, lists 27 specimens from the collection and another 44 not in the collection but illustrated in the plates. The section on Hadrian's Imperial coinage on the Beast Coins website lists just under 50 specimens. This coin is apparently unpublished and we do not know of another specimen.
RS87615. Silver denarius, Strack II 43 (eastern mint) cf. RIC II 345 (Rome); BMCRE III 497 (Rome) & pl. 70, 2 (eastern; bare hd. dr.); RSC II 363a (Rome); Hunter II 171 (Rome), Choice aEF, nice portrait, tone on luster, well centered on a broad flan, a few bumps and small scratches, weight 2.978 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain eastern mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Victory seated left on stool, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; very rare; $380.00 (€323.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Trajan likely intended Hadrian as his successor, but he never made it official. The adoption was signed not by Trajan but by his wife Plotina, and was dated the day after Trajan's death. That Hadrian was still in Syria was a further irregularity, as Roman law required the presence of both parties at the adoption. Rumors, doubts, and speculation attended Hadrian's succession. Trajan's young manservant Phaedimus died soon after Trajan and it was suggested that he was killed (or killed himself) to avoid awkward questions. Ancient sources are divided on the legitimacy of Hadrian's adoption: Dio Cassius thought it bogus and the Historia Augusta writer genuine. This coin, from Hadrian's first issue, was undoubtedly intended to counteract the rumors doubting his legitimacy.
RB89341. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II 534(a) (R), Cohen II 523, BMCRE III 1101, Hunter III -, SRCV II -, aF, weight 12.415 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1st issue, 117 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DIVI TRAIAN AVG F TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse DAC PARTHICO P M TR P COS P P, Divus Traian, on left, standing right, handing globe to Hadrian, on right, standing left, both are togate, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $85.00 (€72.25)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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A similar specimen (no P P on obverse) was sold in NAC 39, lot 120, for over $500. The obverse of our coin was struck with a finer style die and including the P P in the legend.
RS89694. Silver denarius, RIC II 339(c), RSC II 382c, SRCV II 3473, BMCRE III 483 var. (laureate), Hunter III 166 var. (same), VF, nice portrait, light toning, small edge splits, weight 3.102 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 - 132 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, bare head right; reverse COS III, Aequitas standing slightly left head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Beast Coins, ex Paul Balla Collection; $140.00 (€119.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon in 126 A.D. First commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus, it was a temple dedicated to all the gods of ancient Rome. The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 meters (142 ft. It is one of the best-preserved of all Roman buildings. It has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a Roman Catholic church dedicated to "St. Mary and the Martyrs" but informally known as "Santa Maria Rotonda." The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda.Pantheon on Wikipedia

SH89701. Silver denarius, RIC II 380 (S), RSC II 1100 (hybrid), BMCRE II -, Hunter III -, SRCV II -, Choice gVF, excellent portrait, mint luster, well centered, edge cracks, weight 3.391 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 128 - 129 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back and resting on helmet, Victory offering wreath in extended right hand, inverted spear vertical behind in left hand, grounded shield behind; ex Beast Coins; very rare; $200.00 (€170.00)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian

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Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was honored for her role promoting understanding and marital harmony in the imperial household, but she did not serve Sabina well. Sabina is said to have remarked that she had taken steps to see she never had children by Hadrian because they would "harm the human race."
RS91015. Silver denarius, RIC II Hadrian 391, RSC II 24, BMCRE III Hadrian 932, Hunter II 13, SRCV II -, F, toned, bumps and scratches, weight 3.202 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 134 - 136 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right, hair in a plait down back of her neck; reverse CONCORDIA AVG (harmony of the Emperor), Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, cornucopia under seat; ex Eric J. Engstrom Collection; $75.00 (€63.75)


Lot of 22 Prutot, Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

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Agrippa was son of Aristobulus and Bernice, a grandson of Herod the Great. He spent his boyhood at the imperial court in Rome. His friend Caligula bestowed former territories of Philip and Herod Antipas. Claudius bestowed Judaea. He had James, the brother of John, executed (Acts 12:1-2) and imprisoned Peter (Acts 12:3-5).
LT68222. Bronze Lot, Hendin 1244, lot of 22 prutot (singular: prutah), Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L - ς (year 6); actual coins in the photograph, as is, no returns; $240.00 (€204.00)


Lot of 20 Prutot, Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

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Agrippa was son of Aristobulus and Bernice, a grandson of Herod the Great. He spent his boyhood at the imperial court in Rome. His friend Caligula bestowed former territories of Philip and Herod Antipas. Claudius bestowed Judaea. He had James, the brother of John, executed (Acts 12:1-2) and imprisoned Peter (Acts 12:3-5).
LT68223. Bronze Lot, Hendin 1244, lot of 20 prutot (singular: prutah), Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L - ς (year 6); actual coins in the photograph, as is, no returns; $275.00 (€233.75)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Justitia is the Roman goddess or personification of justice. She was not depicted on many Roman coin types. Perhaps this coin would make a nice gift for a lawyer or judge!
RS88833. Silver denarius, RSC II 877, BMCRE III 74, RIC II 42, Strack II 36, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, aVF, die wear, some light marks and scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.101 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 118 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS II, Justitia seated left on throne with high back, patera in extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, IVSTITIA in exergue; ex Numismatic Naumann auction 72, lot 1045 (part of); $125.00 (€106.25)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Regina, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Moneta, holding the scales symbolic of equity and a cornucopia indicating plenty. This surname was given to Juno because she counseled the Romans to undertake only just wars in which case she promised that they would never be in want of money. The first mint in Rome was within the temple of Juno Moneta.
RS88834. Silver denarius, RIC II 256(d), RSC II 966, BMCRE III 680, Hunter II 223, Strack II 251, SRCV II 3507 var. (bare head, slight drapery), VF, excellent portrait, light toning, flow lines, light marks and scratches, small edge cracks, weight 3.277 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1045; $175.00 (€148.75)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Regina, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Moneta, holding the scales symbolic of equity and a cornucopia indicating plenty. This surname was given to Juno because she counseled the Romans to undertake only just wars in which case she promised that they would never be in want of money. The first mint in Rome was within the temple of Juno Moneta.
RS88835. Silver denarius, RIC II 256(b), RSC II 963, Strack II 251, SRCV II 3507, BMCRE III 677 var. (no drapery), Hunter II 222 var. (same), VF, excellent portrait, flow lines, reverse a little off center, edge cracks, weight 3.544 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing facing, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1045; $165.00 (€140.25)




  







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