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Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87387. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber 1453d; BMC Seleucid p. 39, 51; Rouvier, JIAN V, p. 122, 1208; Hoover Seleukid 665 (R1), F, well centered, light corrosion, weight 5.456 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Quasi-municipal, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, c. 168 - 164 B.C.; obverse diademed and radiate head of Antiochos IV right, ∆ (control) behind; reverse galley left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY in two lines above, ΣI∆ΩNIΩN over Phoenician script (of the Sidonians) below; rare; $120.00 (102.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochos IV assumed divine epithets, which no other Hellenistic king had done, such as Theos Epiphanes ("God Manifest") and after his defeat of Egypt, Nikephoros ("Bearer of Victory"). But his often eccentric behavior, capricious actions and even insanity led some of his contemporaries to call him Epimanes ("The Mad One"), a word play off of his title Epiphanes. In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87384. Bronze dichalkon, Houghton-Lorber 1509, SNG Spaer 1204, BMC Seleucid 24, Newel ESM p. 272, Houghton CSE 984, Hoover Seleukid 637 (R2), F, brown tone, light corrosion, edge crack, weight 8.286 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Seleucia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, c. 173 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos IV right, B over X (mark of value = dichalkon) lower left, fillet border; reverse goddess Nicephorus seated left on high backed throne, wearing polos, Nike in extended right hand, long beaked bird left at feet, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left; rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87385. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber 1425(1), Babelon 647, Hoover Syrian 657 (R2), BMC Seleucid 84 var., SNG Spaer 1046 var., Houghton CSE 405 var. (all var. monograms), aVF, well centered, brown tone, corrosion, weight 8.039 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 135o, quasi-municipal, Seleukia Pieria mint, c. 169 - 168 B.C.; obverse diademed and radiate head of Antiochos IV right; reverse vertical winged thunderbolt, ΣEΛEYKEΩN/TΩN in two lines downward on right, EM ΠIEPIAI downward on right, monogram over quiver (controls) outer left, monogram (control) outer right, all in oak wreath; rare; $95.00 (80.75)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87386. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 1418(1)a, Houghton CSE 131, Hoover Syrian 656 (R1), BMC Seleucid 61 var. (control), Babelon 631 var. (same), VF, well centered, black patina with red earthen highlighting, scratches, encrustations, some light corrosion, weight 8.345 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint mint, 168 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochos IV right, one diadem end flying up, the other falling forward over shoulder; reverse Zeus standing slightly right, head left, wreath in raised right hand, ANTIOΞEΩN downward on right, TΩN ΠPOΣ ∆AΦNHI, A over M (control) outer left; rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Born a leader, his genius and charisma led the Macedonian army to create an empire covering most of the then-known world, from Greece to India. His reign begins the Hellenistic Age, a time when civilization flourished. He was regarded as a god and his fame grew even greater after his premature death at thirty-two.
GS86272. Silver tetradrachm, Price 129; Mller Alexander 280; SNG Cop 689; Ehrhardt Amphipolis 13; Newell Reattribution p. xiii, 11, NGC Ch XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (2490380-004), weight 16.791 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 315o, Amphipolis mint, c. 323 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, apluster left, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, Π over dot below throne; certified (slabbed) by NGC (the photograph was taken before certification); $500.00 (425.00)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D.

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In 36 A.D., Herod Antipas suffered major losses in a war with Aretas IV of Nabataea, provoked partly by Antipas' divorce of Aretas' daughter. According to Josephus, Herod's defeat was popularly believed to be divine punishment for his execution of John the Baptist. Tiberius ordered Vitellius, the governor of Syria, to capture or kill Aretas, but Vitellius was reluctant to support Herod and abandoned his campaign upon Tiberius' death in 37.
SL87331. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 5, 152; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 60; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763, NGC AU (about uncirculated), strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (2490380-003), weight 3.561 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 270o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 36 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, laurel wreath ties fall in small undulations (waves); reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; certified (slabbed) by NGC (the photograph was taken before certification); $800.00 (680.00)











Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 17, 2018.
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