Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Jul 26, 2017

Jul 23, 2017

Jul 07, 2017
Medieval & Modern Coins
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Recent AdditionsView Options:  |  |  |   

Recent Additions

Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Roman poet Ovid tells the story of the Phoenix: 'Most beings spring from other individuals; but there is a certain kind which reproduces itself. The Assyrians call it the Phoenix. It does not live on fruit or flowers, but on frankincense and odoriferous gums. When it has lived five hundred years, it builds itself a nest in the branches of an oak, or on the top of a palm tree. In this it collects cinnamon and spikenard, and myrrh, and of these materials builds a pile on which it deposits itself, and dying, breathes out its last breath amidst odors. From the body of the parent bird, a young Phoenix issues forth, destined to live as long a life as its predecessor. When this has grown up and gained sufficient strength, it lifts its nest from the tree (its own cradle and its parent's sepulcher), and carries it to the city of Heliopolis in Egypt, and deposits it in the temple of the Sun.'
BB83784. Bronze quarter maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 93 (S), LRBC II 2019, Voetter 36, SRCV V 18253, Cohen VII 57, Hunter V -, aVF, ragged flan, weight 2.767 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 348 - 15 Mar 351 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), radiate Phoenix standing right on globe, CONSS* in exergue; scarce; $25.00 (€22.25)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 352, Constantius II invaded northern Italy in pursuit of usurper Magnus Magnentius, who retreated with his army to Gaul. Constantius declared an amnesty for Magnentius' soldiers, many of whom deserted to him. By the end of the year Constantius entered Milan. In 353, Constantius II defeated Magnentius at the Battle of Mons Seleucus. Magnentius committed suicide to avoid capture. Constantius became the sole emperor and reunified the Roman Empire.
BB83789. Bronze reduced maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 121, LRBC II 2043, Cohen VIII 45, SRCV V 18277, F, green patina, corrosion, scratches, edge cracks, weight 2.456 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 351 - 355 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier spearing fallen horseman, dot in center, CONSA in exergue; $9.00 (€8.01)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it New Rome, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire there from Rome. The city soon became known as Constantinopolis.
BB83871. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Heraclea 138 (R5), LRBC I 926, SRCV V 17692, Cohen VII 104, Hunter V -, aF, green patina, well centered, weight 1.584 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 333 - 336 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, SMHΓ* in exergue; rare; $8.00 (€7.12)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Beginning in 330 A.D., pagan temples were progressively abandoned, destroyed or left to fall into disrepair, except for those that were transformed into Christian churches.
BB83884. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Constantinople 61 (R2), LRBC I 1007, SRCV V 17693, Cohen VII 104, aF, a little rough, weight 1.648 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 330 - 333 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, CONSS in exergue; $6.00 (€5.34)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This reverse is usually used to indicate a caesar is the hope of the Republic. Its use here is odd because Constantius had already ruled for nearly two decades.
BB83885. Bronze reduced maiorina, RIC VIII Sirmium 80, LRBC II 1615, SRCV V 18315, Cohen VIII 188, Voetter -, aF, tight ragged flan, weight 1.747 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 180o, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, 6 Nov 355 - 3 Nov 361; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SPES REIPVBLICE (the hope of the Republic), emperor standing left, wearing helmet and military dress, globe in right hand, spear in left hand, ASIRM in exergue; $8.00 (€7.12)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The cistophorus was first struck by the Pergamene Kingdom was a tetradrachm (four-drachms coin) struck on a reduced Asian standard of about 3 grams per drachm. Its name was derived from the cista, a Dionysian cult snake basket that frequently appeared on the obverse. After the Pergamene Kingdom was bequeathed to Rome in 133 B.C., the Romans continued to strike cistophori for the Asia province, with a value equal to three denarii. The portrait of Augustus and later emperors replaced the cista on the obverse.
SH85434. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Sutherland Group VI, RPC I 2215, RIC I 479, RSC I 33, BnF I 922, BMCRE I 694, BMCRR East 262, VF, full circles strike on a broad flan, light uneven toning, light encrustations, small closed edge crack, weight 11.660 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesus mint, c. 25 - 20 B.C.; obverse IMP CAE-SAR (counterclockwise below), bare head right, linear border; reverse garlanded and filleted altar, ornamented on the front with two hinds (or stags) standing confronted, AVGVSTVS above; $1200.00 (€1068.00)


Lydian Kingdom, Uncertain King Before Kroisos, c. 610 - 561 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to use gold and silver coins and the first to establish retail shops in permanent locations. It is not known, however, whether Herodotus meant that the Lydians were the first to use coins of pure gold and pure silver or the first precious metal coins in general. Despite this ambiguity, this statement of Herodotus is one of the pieces of evidence most often cited on behalf of the argument that Lydians invented coinage, at least in the West, even though the first coins were neither gold nor silver but an alloy of the two called electrum.
SH85438. Electrum hemihekte, Weidauer Series XVI 90, SNG Kayhan 1015, SNGvA 2871, Rosen 654, Boston MFA 1770, VF, well centered, scratches, earthen deposits, small edge crack, weight 1.164 g, maximum diameter 7.2 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 610 - 546 B.C.; obverse head of roaring lion right, knob on forehead; reverse square incuse punch; $800.00 (€712.00)


Lydian Kingdom, Uncertain King Before Kroisos, c. 610 - 561 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to use gold and silver coins and the first to establish retail shops in permanent locations. It is not known, however, whether Herodotus meant that the Lydians were the first to use coins of pure gold and pure silver or the first precious metal coins in general. Despite this ambiguity, this statement of Herodotus is one of the pieces of evidence most often cited on behalf of the argument that Lydians invented coinage, at least in the West, even though the first coins were neither gold nor silver but an alloy of the two called electrum.
SH85439. Electrum hemihekte, Weidauer Series XVI 90, SNG Kayhan 1015, SNGvA 2871, Rosen 654, Boston MFA 1770, VF, light marks, earthen deposits, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.181 g, maximum diameter 7.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 610 - 546 B.C.; obverse head of roaring lion right, knob on forehead; reverse square incuse punch; $600.00 (€534.00)


Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH85442. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, Dewing 1611, SGCV I 2526, aEF, well centered, tight flan cutting off most of crest (as typical), some obverse die wear, weight 17.176 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AΘE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square; $2000.00 (€1780.00)


Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH85443. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, Dewing 1611, SGCV I 2526, VF, fantastic full crest, bumps and marks, light tone, weight 17.109 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 225o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AΘE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square; $1800.00 (€1602.00)




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, July 27, 2017.
Page created in 1.529 seconds
FORUM ANCIENT COINS