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Thasos, Islands off Thrace, c. 200 - 180 B.C.

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Thasian wine was quite famous in antiquity, which explains why the obverse of this type depicts the head of the wine god Dionysos. The club on the reverse is the club of Herakles, whose worship on Thasos had most ancient origins. Thasos was first colonized at an early date by Phoenicians; they founded a temple to the god Melqart. The temple still existed in the time of Herodotus (c. 484 - 425 B.C.). The Greeks identified Melqart as "Tyrian Heracles" and his cult was merged with Heracles in the course of the island's Hellenization.
GS87874. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 1036; SNG Dewing 1335; BMC Thrace p. 222, 66; Le Rider 48; HGC 6 355 (R1) corr. (listed as a drachm), VF, toned, light marks and scratches, porosity, weight 1.652 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Thasos mint, c. 200 - 180 B.C.; obverse wreathed and bearded head of Dionysos right; reverse ΘAΣI/ΩN above and below club in wreath; ex Beast Coins; rare; $120.00 (102.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

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Seleucia on the Tigris is now under a suburb about 18 miles south of modern Baghdad.
GS87602. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 1162.1, Newell ESM 240, HGC 9 447mm, aVF, well centered, attractive style, bumps and marks, tiny edge crack, weight 16.805 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 315o, Seleucia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, winter of 211/210 B.C.; obverse Antiochos' diademed head right, bangs over forehead and sideburn, diadem ends waiving elaborately behind head, dot border; reverse Apollo Delphios naked seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow behind, bow ornamented with two sets of two disks, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, monograms left, right, and in exergue; $240.00 (204.00)


Apameia, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, 9 - 8 B.C.

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Apamea is believed to be the Biblical city Shepham (Num. xxxiv. 11). Rome received Apamea with the Pergamene Kingdom in 133 B.C., but sold it to Mithridates V of Pontus, who held it till 120 BC. After the Mithridatic Wars it became a great center for trade, largely carried on by resident Italians and Jews. Pompey razed the fortress and annexed the city to Rome in 64 B.C. Apamea is mentioned in the Talmud (Ber. 62a, Niddah, 30b and Yeb. 115b). By order of Flaccus, nearly 45 kilograms of gold, intended by Jews for the Temple in Jerusalem was confiscated in Apamea in 62 B.C. In the revolt of Syria under Q. Caecilius Bassus, it held out against Julius Caesar for three years until the arrival of Cassius in 46 B.C.Great Colonnade at Apamea

GY87604. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 4353; SNG Cop 301; SNG Mn 809; BMC Galatia p. 234, 12; Lindgren-Kovacs 2032; SGCV II 5870; HGC 9 1425 (S) var. (date), gVF, well centered, some porosity, weight 8.033 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 90o, Syria, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 9 - 8 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right wreathed with ivy, ME monogram behind; reverse thyrsos (staff of Dionysos), AΠAMEΩN / THΣ IEPAΣ in two downward lines on right, KAI AΣYΛOY downward on left, ∆T (year 304 of the Seleucid Era) downward inner left; scarce; $260.00 (221.00)


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

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Libertas (Latin for Liberty) was the Roman goddess and embodiment of liberty. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some early U.S. coins.
SH87605. Silver denarius, RIC I 105, RSC II 47, BMCRE I 31, BnF III 67, Hunter I 11, SRCV I 2198, VF, toned, centered on a tight flan, light scratches and marks, tiny edge crack, weight 3.100 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, May - Jul 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS RESTITVTA (Liberty restored), Libertas standing facing, head right, pileus in extended right hand, long rod vertical in left hand; rare; $780.00 (663.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos IV Philopater, 187 - 175 B.C.

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Seleucus IV Philopator ruled Syria (then including Cilicia and Judea), Mesopotamia, Babylonia and Nearer Iran (Media and Persia). To help pay the heavy war-indemnity exacted by Rome, he sent his minister Heliodorus to Jerusalem to seize the Jewish temple treasury. On his return, Heliodorus assassinated Seleucus, and seized the throne for himself.
GS87608. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1313(1), Newell SMA 39, SNG Spaer 837, HGC 9 580e, VF/F, high relief sculptural portrait, obverse off center, porous, corrosion, two small lamination defects on reverse, weight 15.671 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse diademed head of Seleucus IV right, fillet border; reverse Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΣEΛEYKOY downward on left, wreath tied with ribbons and palm frond outer left, monogram in exergue; $240.00 (204.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

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At the age of eighteen, Antiochus III inherited a disorganized state. Much of Anatolia had been lost and the easternmost provinces had revolted and broken away. After some initial defeats, Antiochus took Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt and then conquered Anatolia, earning him the epithet "the Great." In 192 B.C. Antiochus invaded Greece with a 10,000-man army, and was elected the commander in chief of the Aetolian League. In 191 B.C., however, the Romans routed him at Thermopylae, forcing him to withdraw to Anatolia. The Romans followed up by invading Anatolia and defeating him again. By the Treaty of Apamea 188 B.C., Antiochus abandoned all territory north and west of the Taurus, most of which the Roman Republic gave either to Rhodes or to the Attalid ruler Eumenes II, its allies. Many Greek cities were left free. As a consequence of this blow to the Seleucid power, the provinces which had recovered by Antiochus, reasserted their independence. Antiochus mounted a fresh eastern expedition. He died while pillaging a temple of Bel at Elymas, Persia, in 187 B.C.
GS87609. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 1167(1), Newell ESM 254, SNG von Post 576, VF/F, scratches and marks, pitting, corrosion, minor edge flaking, weight 15.471 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukia on the Tigris (Bagdad, Iraq) mint, 204 - 187 B.C.; obverse Antiochos' diademed head right, middle aged portrait, horn-like lock of hair above ear; reverse Apollo naked seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, monogram in exergue; $240.00 (204.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos VI Epiphanes Nikator, c. 96 - 94 B.C.

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GS87612. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2405(9); SNG Spaer 2782, Kraay-Mrkholm Essays p. 93, 59 ff.; HGC 9 2405, VF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, light scratches and marks, weight 14.620 g, maximum diameter 29.8 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia on the Kalykadnos mint, c. 96 - 94 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukos VI right, diadem ends falling straight behind, fillet border; reverse Athena standing left, Nike standing right offering wreath in Athena's right hand, left hand resting on grounded shield, grounded spear vertical behind, ANEIΣI (ANE ligate) downward inner left; $260.00 (221.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.

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Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.
GS87616. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2061.1s, Newell SMA 280, SNG Spaer 1852, HGC 9 1067d, VF, slightly off center, corrosion, light scratches, weight 16.461 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 138 - 129 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse Athena standing slightly left, head left, right hand extended through inscription to border holding Nike, grounded shield in left hand, spear leaning on left arm, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY in two downward lines on right, EYEPΓETOY downward on left, ligate ∆I over Λ outer left, laurel wreath border; $240.00 (204.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.

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Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.
GS87618. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2061.1s, Newell SMA 280, SNG Spaer 1852, HGC 9 1067d, VF, well centered on a broad flan, light bumps and marks, small spots of light corrosion on the obverse, weight 16.109 g, maximum diameter 31.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 138 - 129 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse Athena standing slightly left, head left, right hand extended through inscription to border holding Nike, grounded shield in left hand, spear leaning on left arm, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY in two downward lines on right, EYEPΓETOY downward on left, ligate ∆I over Λ outer left, laurel wreath border; $260.00 (221.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius II Nikator, 146 - 138 and 129 - 125 B.C.

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Demetrius II ruled for two periods, separated by years of captivity in Parthia. He gained the throne with the help of Egypt, but general Diodotus rebelled, took Antioch and made Antiochus VI Dionysus his puppet king. Demetrius then ruled part of the kingdom from Seleucia. In 38 B.C. he attacked the Parthians but was defeated and captured, ending his first reign. The Parthians released him in 129 B.C. when his brother, Antiochus VII Sidetes, marched against Parthia. They hoped the brothers would fight a civil war but the Parthians soon defeated Sidetes, and Demetrius returned to rule Syria. His second reign portraits show him wearing a Parthian style beard. His second reign ended when he was defeated and killed by yet another usurper set up by Egypt, Alexander II Zabinas.
GY87637. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton Tarsus p. 114 group D, A4/P15 (unlisted die combination), Houghton-Lorber II 2156(3), HGC 9 1117a (S), VF, small areas of corrosion, weight 15.116 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Royal workshop, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 2nd reign, 129 - 125 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of bearded Demetrios II right, hair combed smooth on the crown of head, diadem ends fall straight, fillet border; reverse Zeus seated left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, Nike holding wreath in Zeus' right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ∆HMHTPIOY in two downward lines on right, ΘEOY / NIKATOPOS in two downward lines on left, PHA monogram over PHA monogram outer left; scarce; $440.00 (374.00)




  







Catalog current as of Monday, December 10, 2018.
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