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Recent Additions

Jan 14, 2017
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Recent Additions

Theodosius II, 10 January 402 - 28 July 450 A.D.

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Theodosius ruled in the east from Constantinople. His uncle Honorius ruled in the west from Mediolanum (Milan) and, after 401, from Ravenna.
BB77631. Bronze centenionalis, cf. RIC X Theodosius 410 (S), LRBC II 2225, Hahn MIRB 74, SRCV V 21204, VF/F, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, green patina with some coppery high points, weight 1.569 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 415 - 423 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, star behind; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, Theodosius II and Honorius standing facing, heads to center confronted, each holding spear in outer hand and supporting globe between them, CONS[...?] in exergue; rare; $38.00 (€33.82)


Valentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D.

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On 2 January 366, the Alamanni crossed the frozen Rhine in large numbers, invading the Roman Empire. Valentinian I, based in Trier, defeated them along the border at the Rhine in 368.
RL77793. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 15(a)x, LRBC II 1302, SRCV V 19507, Cohen VIII 37, VF, green patina, tight flan, marks and scratches, weight 2.274 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 24 Aug 367 - 17 Nov 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, R left, •∆SISC in exergue; $28.00 (€24.92)


Valentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RL77794. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 7(a)ii, LRBC II 1277, SRCV V 19506, Cohen VIII 37, Choice VF, well centered and struck, green patina with some copper high points, flan crack, weight 2.471 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 25 Feb 364 - 24 Aug 367 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing right, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, •∆SISC in exergue; $32.00 (€28.48)


Valentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D.

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Valentinian I was proclaimed emperor shortly after the death of Jovian in 364 A.D. He settled in Paris, established a militia to defend the region and ruled the Western Roman Empire from Caledonia (Scotland) to the Rhine frontier. Valentinian spent most of his reign along the Rhine frontier, combating barbarian invasions ensuring the Empire a few years of relative security. His brother, Valens, ruled the Eastern Roman Empire from the Danube to the Persian border. his reign combating barbarian invasions along the Rhine frontier ensuring the Empire a few years of relative security. His brother, Valens, ruled the Eastern Roman Empire from the Danube to the Persian border.
RL77795. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 1405, RIC IX Siscia 15(a)xxxv var. (R and A positions reversed), SRCV V 1405, Cohen VIII 37, Choice VF, nice glossy green patina, weight 2.386 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 24 Aug 367 - 17 Nov 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory walking left, wreath in right, palm over shoulder in left, R over A with a hook on top on left, F on right, ΓSISCS exergue; $32.00 (€28.48)


Valentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RL77796. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 15(a)xvi, LRBC II 1329, SRCV V 19509, Cohen VIII 37, Choice VF, nice green patina, some light marks, weight 2.438 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 24 Aug 367 - 17 Nov 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, * over F left, M right, ∆SISC in exergue; $32.00 (€28.48)


Valentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D.

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They look similar, but there is a significant physical difference between angels and Victory. Angels are all male. Victory (Nike) is female. On Byzantine coinage, the male angel replaced the female Victory after the reunion with Rome was concluded on 28 March 519 A.D.
RL77797. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 7(a)ii, LRBC II 1277, SRCV V 19506, Cohen VIII 37, VF, green patina, nice obverse, reverse a little rough, weight 2.250 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 25 Feb 364 - 24 Aug 367 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, •∆SISC in exergue; $20.00 (€17.80)


Valentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D.

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They look similar, but there is a significant physical difference between angels and Victory. Angels are all male. Victory (Nike) is female. On Byzantine coinage, the male angel replaced the female Victory after the reunion with Rome was concluded on 28 March 519 A.D.
RL77798. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 7(a)ii, LRBC II 1277, SRCV V 19506, Cohen VIII 37, Choice VF, well centered and struck, green patina, some porosity, weight 2.637 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 25 Feb 364 - 24 Aug 367 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, •∆SISC in exergue; $28.00 (€24.92)


Gratian, 24 August 367 - 25 August 383 A.D.

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On 19 January 379, Emperor Gratian elevated Flavius Theodosius at Sirmium, giving him the title Augustus with power over all the eastern provinces. Theodosius came to terms with the Visigoths and settled them in the Balkans as military allies (foederati).
RL77942. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX Constantinopolis 52(a)3, LRBC II 2150, SRCV V 19997, Cohen VIII 25, gF, well centered, a little rough, weight 5.839 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 19 Jan 379 - 25 Aug 383 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, transverse spear in right hand, shield on left arm; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor standing left on galley, head right, wearing helmet and military garb, paludamentum flying behind, raising right hand, Victory steering at helm, wreath left, CONB in exergue; larger bronze for the period; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $40.00 (€35.60)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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While Constantine and his sons had been strong military figures, they had also re-established the practice of hereditary succession, adopted by Valentinian I. The obvious flaw in these two competing requirements came in the reign of Valentinian II, a child. His reign was a harbinger of the fifth century, when children or nonentities, reigning as emperors, were controlled by powerful generals and officials.
RL77944. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Aquileia 32(b) (S), LRBC II 1069, SRCV V 20291, Cohen VIII 8, VF, nice green patina, earthen encrustations, edge split, scratches, weight 2.582 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Aquileia mint, 375 - 378 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS IVN P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGGG, Roma seated facing, helmeted head left, globe in right hand, reversed spear in left hand, left leg bare, SMAQP in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; scarce; $40.00 (€35.60)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
BB79502. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX Thessalonica 44(a)2, LRBC II 1836, SRCV V 20257, Cohen VIII 22, F, rough, weight 4.720 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 150o, 1st officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 25 Aug 383 - 386 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, draped and cuirassed bust right, transverse spear in right hand, shield on left arm; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, Emperor standing slightly in galley, head right, in galley, raising right hand, wearing helmet and military garb, paludamentum flying behind, Victory steering at helm, wreath left, •TESA in exergue; $18.00 (€16.02)




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, January 19, 2017.
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