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Recent Additions

Anglo-Gallic, Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Aquitaine, 1362 - 1372

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Edward of Woodstock (15 June 1330 - 8 June 1376), called the Black Prince, was the eldest son of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault, and the father of King Richard II of England. He was the first Duke of Cornwall (from 1337), the Prince of Wales (from 1343) and the Prince of Aquitaine (1362-72). He was an exceptional military leader, and his victories over the French at the Battles of Crécy and Poitiers made him very popular in England during his lifetime. Edward died one year before his father, becoming the first English Prince of Wales not to become King of England. The throne passed instead to his son Richard II, a minor, upon the death of Edward III.
SH84611. Silver esterlin (sterling), Elias 194c, SCBC 8133, Duplessy Féodales 1125A, Boudeau 511, Poey d'Avant –, VF, toned, usual tight flan, clashed obverse die, slightly off center, weight 0.996 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, Poitiers mint, second issue; obverse + : ED' PO·GIT·REG·AnGL P (Edwardus Primo Genetis Regis Anglie Princeps, double annulet before legend, rosette stops), half-length figure of Edward right, wearing floral wreath. sword in right hand over right shoulder, raising left hand in benediction; reverse : PRI-CPS - AQV-TAE (Prince of Aquitaine, double annulet before legend), long cross pattée, trefoil of three pellets in each quarter; scarce; $330.00 (€293.70)


France, Louis XIV the Sun King, 1643 - 1715

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This coin is overstruck on an older coin, part of a "reformation" process involving financial manipulations and impacting all French silver and gold coinage from 1690 to 1709. The undertype is a Louis XIV, demi-écu aux huit L, Paris, workshop A, 1690 - 1693, Duplessy 1515; obverse: LVD•XIIII•D•G (sun) FR•ET•NAV•REX, draped and cuirassed bust of Louis XIV right, wearing large wig, obscure date below; reverse: (Mg) CHRS - REGN - VINC - IMP (star), cross formed of four groups of two L's, each arm under a crown cutting the legend, A (Paris mint workshop letter) in a circle at the center, lis in each quarter.
SH84613. Silver demi-écu aux palmes, Duplessy 1521A, Ciani 1895, Gadoury 185, Krause KM 295.1, VF, extraordinarily strong undertype remnants, reverse of undertype on obverse, obverse of undertype on reverse, weight 13.297 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, die axis 180o, Paris mint, 1694 (A, reformation); obverse LVD•XIIII•D•G (sun) FR•ET•NAV•REX (Louis XIV, by the grace of God, King of France and Navarre), cuirassed bust right, wearing large wig, cuirass ornamented with facing head of Medusa on chest; reverse BENEDICTVM (arrow point) 1964 (crescen horns up - indicates reformation) SIT•NOMEN•DOMINI (Blessed be the name of the Lord), crown above three lis in a circle (round arms of France), between two palms tied at the bottom, •A• (Paris mint workshop letter) below; edge inscribed: (lis) (sun) (lis) (flower) DOMINE (flower) (lis) (flower) SALVVM (lis) (flower) FAC (flower) (lis) (flower) REGEM; $250.00 (€222.50)


France, Henry III, 1574 - 1589

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On May 31, 1575, Henry III created a new 14.188 grams, .833 fine silver coin with the value of 20 sols tournois. The gold écu was set at 60 sols. The gold franc equaled 1/3 écu or 20 sols. This coin, corresponding to the value of the medieval gold franc, naturally took the name franc d'argent (silver franc). Our coin is a franc avec fraise, distinguished from the contemporary franc au col plat by the addition of a lace ruff to the king's collar. It was unique to the Toulouse mint. Due to constant clipping, the coinage of francs was suspended for good on October 13, 1586. After the death of the king, however, mints held by the Catholic League struck francs in his name.
SH84614. Silver franc, Duplessy 1130A, Ciani 1434, Roberts 3612, Lafaurie 970, aVF, iridescent toning, weight 13.995 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 180o, Toulouse (M) mint, 1586; obverse •HENRICVS•III D•G FRANC ET•POL•REX• (Henry III, by the grace of god, King of France and Poland), laureate and cuirassed bust of Henry III, ruffled collar, M (Toulouse workshop letter) below bust, 1586 at bottom between end and beginning of legend; reverse * SIT•NOMEN•DOMINI•BENEDICTVM S (Blessed be the name of the Lord), foliate cross fleurée, H surrounded by dots in the center; $750.00 (€667.50)


France, Louis XVI, 10 May 1774 - 4 September 1791 A.D.

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Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste, was the last King of France and Navarre before the French Revolution; during which he was also known as Louis Capet. In 1765, at the death of his father, Louis, Dauphin of France, son and heir apparent of Louis XV of France, Louis-Auguste became the new Dauphin. Upon his grandfather's death on 10 May 1774, he became King of France and Navarre, which he remained until 4 September 1791, when he received the title of King of the French until his suspension on 10 August 1792. Louis XVI was guillotined on 21 January 1793.

The Louis d'or (20 francs) under Louis XVI was minted between 1785 and 1792 and had a dimension of 23 mm, and a weight of 7.6490 g, a fineness of 0.917, and gold content of 0.2255 troy oz.
SH84615. Gold louis d'or, Duplessy 1707, Ciani 2183, Gadoury 361, Krause KM 591.5, Friedberg 475, Choice EF, mint luster, light marks, weight 7.663 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Lyon mint, 1786, 1st issue; obverse LUD. XVI. D. G. FR. - ET NAV. REX (LVDOVICVS XIII DEI GRATIA FRANCIAE ET NAVARRAE REX "Louis XIII by the grace of God king of France and of Navarre"), head of Louis XVI left, DUVIV (engraver B. Duvivier) on truncation, bee (sign of the mintmaster Jean-Claude Gabet) below; reverse CHRS. REGN. VINC. IMPER 1786 (CHRISTVS REGNAT VINCIT IMPERAT "Christ reigns, conquers and commands"), crowned arms of France and Navarre, D (Lyon mintmark) below, eagle head left (symbol of engraver Jean Humbert Bernavon) before date; $1000.00 (€890.00)


France, Strasbourg, Louis XIV, 1684

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The Free City of Strasbourg remained neutral during the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648) and retained its status as a Free Imperial City. However, the city was later annexed by Louis XIV of France to extend the borders of his kingdom. Louis' advisors believed that, as long as Strasbourg remained independent, it would endanger the King's newly annexed territories in Alsace, and, that to defend these large rural lands effectively, a garrison had to be placed in towns such as Strasbourg. Indeed, the bridge over the Rhine at Strasbourg had been used repeatedly by Imperial (Holy Roman Empire) forces, and three times during the Franco-Dutch War Strasbourg had served as a gateway for Imperial invasions into Alsace. In September 1681 Louis' forces, though lacking a clear casus belli, surrounded the city with overwhelming force. After some negotiation, Louis marched into the city unopposed on 30 September 1681 and proclaimed its annexation.
SH84610. Silver Sol, Ciani 2054, Gadoury 87, Duplessy 1599, Krause KM 245, VF, toned, light deposits, weight 0.936 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Strasbourg mint, 1684; obverse MON• NOV• ARGENTINENSIS (new currency of Strasbourg), fleur-de-lis; reverse *GLORIA• IN• EXCELSIS• DEO• (glory to God in heaven), •I• / •SOL• / 1684 in three lines; ex Gordon Andreas Singer; $220.00 (€195.80)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Viminacium, Moesia Superior

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Viminacium was a Roman Colony founded by Gordian III in 239 A.D. The usual legend is P.M.S. COL. VIM., abbreviating Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium. The usual type is a female personification of Moesia standing between a lion and a bull. The bull and the lion were symbols of the Legions VII and IV, which were quartered in the province.
SL84535. Bronze AE 28, H-J Viminacium 24 (R2); Varbanov I 130; AMNG I/I 96; BMC Thrace p. 16, 17; SGICV 3874; Mousmov 36, ANACS F12 (4988740), maximum diameter 28 mm, die axis 225o, Viminacium (Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, autumn 243 - autumn 244 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS PIVS FEL AVG P M, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M S COL VIM (Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium), Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands over bull on left standing right and lion on right standing left, AN V (year 5 of the Viminacium colonial era) in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $80.00 (€71.20)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Eternal peace was just wishful thinking during the reign of Philip I (just as it has always been).
SL84533. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 41, RSC IV 102, Bland 23, SRCV III 8939 var. (pax standing left), Hunter III 12 var. (AETERNA), NGC AU, strike 3/5, surface 4/5, weight 5.03 g, maximum diameter 23 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PAX AETERN (eternal peace), Pax advancing left, branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand; certified (slabbed) by NGC, from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $135.00 (€120.15)


Kingdom of Numidia, Massinissa 203 - 148 B.C., or Micipsa 148 - 118 B.C.

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Numidia was an Ancient Berber kingdom in what is now Algeria and a smaller part of Tunisia, in North Africa. It was bordered by the kingdoms of Mauretania (modern-day Morocco) to the west, the Roman province of Africa (modern-day Tunisia) to the east, the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the Sahara Desert to the south. The long-lived King Masinissa ruled c. 203 -148 B.C. He was succeeded by his son Micipsa. When Micipsa died in 118, he was succeeded by his two sons Hiempsal I and Adherbal, and by his illegitimate grandson, Jugurtha. Jugurtha had Hiempsal killed, which led to war with Adherbal. Rome declared war after Jugurtha killed some Roman businessmen aiding Adherbal. Jugurtha surrendered and received a highly favorable peace treaty, which raised suspicions of bribery. The Roman commander was summoned to Rome to face corruption charges. Jugurtha was also forced to come to Rome to testify, where he was completely discredited. War broke out again and several legions were dispatched to North Africa. The war dragged out into a seemingly endless campaign. Frustrated at the apparent lack of action, Gaius Marius returned to Rome to seek election as Consul. Marius was elected, and then returned to take control of the war. He sent his Quaestor Lucius Cornelius Sulla to neighboring Mauretania to eliminate their support for Jugurtha. With the help of Bocchus I of Mauretania, Sulla captured Jugurtha. In 104 B.C., after being paraded through the streets of Rome in Marius' Triumph, Jugurtha was executed.
SL84534. Bronze AE 27, Alexandropoulos MAA 18a; Mazard III 50; Müller Afrique III p. 18, 32; SNG Cop 505 ff.; SGCV II 6597, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (3854272-006), weight 16.02 g, maximum diameter 27 mm, die axis 0o, Cirta (Constantine, Algeria) mint, 203 - 118 B.C.; obverse laureate head of king left, pointed beard, dot border; reverse horse galloping left, pellet below, linear border; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $120.00 (€106.80)


Parthian Kingdom, Vologases I, 51 - 78 A.D.

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"We cannot tell whether the use of 'lord' rather than 'king' implies a subordinate status; probably the rulers themselves were uncertain of the exact implications and it would be unwise to try to read too much into it." -- Sellwood, NC 1989, p. 163.
GS65700. Silver diobol, Sellwood New pl. 42, 1; Sunrise 426; Shore 379; Alram LNV 3 143; Sellwood -, VF, toned, tight flan, porous, weight 1.248 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Persis mint, 51 - 78 A.D.; obverse bare-headed bust left, medium length beard, wavy hair, wearing diadem with loop at the top and two ends, two-line neck torque has no ends, border of dots; reverse archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne holding bow, left foot drawn back, somewhat blundered Greek inscription reading, with emendations: OΛIΓACOO[Y] TO[Y] KYPIY (Vologases the lord); $90.00 (€80.10)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
SL84528. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1037, BMCRE IV 1420, Hunter II 169, Cohen III 284, MIR 18 233, SRCV II 4977, ANACS VF30 (4625585), Rome mint, Dec 171 - Dec 172 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS - AVG TR P XXVI, laureate head right; reverse IMP VI COS III (imperator 6 times, consul 3 times), Roma seated left on cuirass, helmeted and draped, transverse spear on far side in right hand, resting her left forearm on round shield stacked upon an oval shield and a hexagonal shield, S C (senatus consulto) flanking across fields; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection, certified (slabbed) by ANACS; $195.00 (€173.55)




  







Catalog current as of Friday, April 28, 2017.
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