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Histiaia, North Euboea, Greece, c. 267 - 168 B.C.

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Histiaia, named after its patron nymph, commanded a strategic position overlooking the narrows leading to the North Euboian Gulf. In the Iliad, Homer describes the surrounding plain as "rich in vines." It was pro-Macedonian during the 3rd century, for which it was attacked in 208 and captured in 199 by a Roman-Pergamene force. The Roman garrison was removed in 194. It appears Histiaia continued to prosper but little is known of its later history. Finds at the site indicate it continued to be inhabited in Roman, Byzantine, and later times.
GS77221. Silver tetrobol, cf. BCD Euboia 417; SNG Cop 524; BMC Central p. 132, 98; SGCV I 2498, VF, centered on a tight flan, die wear, weight 1.809 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 315o, Histiaia mint, c. 267 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Histiaia right, wearing earring and necklace, hair rolled and wreathed in vine; reverse IΣTI−AIEΩN (starting below, ending downward upper left), nymph Histiaia seated right on stern of a galley holding naval standard, ornate apluster, wing ornament on hull; $120.00 (106.80)


Parthian Empire, Vologases III, 111 - 146 A.D.

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Vologases III claimed the throne near the end of the reign of Pacorus II. After Osroes' death, he ruled most of Parthia. He had to cope with raiders and with usurpers in Iran, including Mithradates IV and Unknown King III. His coinage is perhaps the most common of all the Parthian rulers, indicating a long rule and vibrant economy.

References for this type are very specific regarding the archer's seat. The seat on Sellwood type 78.5 is a horizontal line, on 78.6 it is two dots, on type 78.7 it resembles Π. This variety, Sellwood 78.4, has no seat.
GS77735. Silver drachm, Sellwood 78.4, Shore 413, Sunrise -, aVF, scratches, weight 3.494 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ecbatana (Hamedan, Iran) mint, 111 - 146 A.D.; obverse bust right with long pointed beard, three waves in hair, diadem with three bands, loop and three ends, earring and wire necklet; reverse archer (Arsakes I) seated right holding bow, cross below legs, AT dot monogram below bow, no seat, seven line blundered Greek legend forming a square around; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $60.00 (53.40)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia

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Nicaea remained an important town throughout the imperial period. Although only 70 km (43 miles) from Constantinople, Nicaea did not lose its importance when Constantinople became the capital of the Eastern Empire. The city suffered from earthquakes in 358, 362 and 368; after the last of which, it was restored by Valens. During the Middle Ages, it was a long time bulwark of the Byzantine emperors against the Turks.
RP79959. Bronze AE 19, Rec Gen II.3 p 489, 713; SNGvA 653; SNG Cop -, VF, nice portrait, well centered and struck, attractive sea-green patina, flan crack, scratches, weight 3.252 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Nicaea (Iznik, Turkey) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AVΓ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse three legionary standards topped with wreaths, N-IK-AI-E/ΩN in two lines, the first divided by the standards, the last two letters in exergue; $80.00 (71.20)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS83528. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 18, 728 (O AC7 / R 521); SNG Cop 1040 ff., gVF, toned, bold well-centered strike, weight 16.699 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $300.00 (267.00)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Plotinopolis, Thrace

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Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP84571. Bronze AE 21, Varbanov III 1842 (R9, same dies, noted as otherwise unpublished), AMNG I/I -, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, SGIC -, VF, excellent portrait, attractive glossy dark green patina, tight flan, some legend unstruck or off flan, centration dimples, weight 4.601 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Plotinopolis (Didimochito, Greece) mint, 211 - 217 A.D.; obverse IOVΛ ∆O - CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse ΠΛΩTEINO-ΠOΛEITΩN, Tyche-Fortuna standing facing, head left, kalathos on head, grounded rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; extremely rare; $100.00 (89.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Berytus, Phoenicia

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The ceremonial founding of a new Roman colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city.

Rouvier notes that this type is very often incorrectly attributed to earlier emperors as the legend is frequently missing and the portrait resembles those of Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nerva.
RP84807. Bronze AE 26, Sawaya cf. 540 (D98/-, unlisted reverse die); RPC Online III 3832 (23 spec.); BMC Phoenicia p. 64, 814; SNG Cop 95; Baramki AUB 52; Rouvier 520, F, tight flan, reverse slightly off center, weight 14.082 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Berytus (Beirut, Lebanon) mint, 98 - 102 A.D.; obverse IMP NER TRAIAN CAES - AVG GERM P P, laureate head right; reverse COL / IVL - AVG - FEL - BER (Colonia Julia Augusta Felix Berytus, FEL is upside down in exergue), veiled founder-priest plowing right with two oxen, plowing sacred pomerium around city; $95.00 (84.55)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia

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Nicaea remained an important town throughout the imperial period. Although only 70 km (43 miles) from Constantinople, Nicaea did not lose its importance when Constantinople became the capital of the Eastern Empire. The city suffered from earthquakes in 358, 362 and 368; after the last of which, it was restored by Valens. During the Middle Ages, it was a long time bulwark of the Byzantine emperors against the Turks.
RP77991. Bronze AE 19, Rec Gen II.3 p. 477, 616; SNGvA 624; Mionnet sup. V 800; BMC Pontus p. 168, 101 (rev inscription NI-K-); SNG Cop 520 (laureate), F, grain, centration dimple on the obverse, weight 3.684 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 45o, Nicaea (Iznik, Turkey) mint, obverse M AVP CEV AΛEΞAN∆POC AVΓ, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse NI-K-AI-E/ΩN, three legionary standards, each topped with a wreath; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $22.00 (19.58)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Excavations of Roman Amphipolis have revealed traces of all the impressive architecture one would expect from a thriving Roman city. A bridge, gymnasium, public and private monuments, sanctuaries, and cemeteries all attest to the city's prosperity. From the early Christian period (after 500 CE) there are traces of four basilicas, a large rectangular building which may have been a bishop's residence, and a church. -- Ancient History Encyclopedia
RP84023. Bronze AE 23, BMC Macedonia p. 58, 126 (same obverse die); Varbanov 3268 (R4) var. (obv. legend); Moushmov 6106; SNG Cop -, aVF, attractive portrait, dark patina, porous, centration dimples, weight 8.283 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse Λ CEΠT CE-OYHPOC ΠEP A-YΓ (YHP ligate), laureate and draped bust right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche of Amphipolis seated left on a throne, wearing kalathos, veil, long chiton and mantle, phiale in extended right hand, star below seat; $150.00 (133.50)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Edessa, Macedonia

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Edessa, Macedonia struck coins from 27 B.C. to 268 A.D. Located on the Via Egnatia, the city prospered in under the Romans but disappeared from history after 500 A.D. In 304 B.C., Seleucus I Nicator commemorated Edessa, Macedonia by founding a city named Edessa in northern Mesopotamia.
RP83477. Bronze diassarion, Papaefthymiou 33 ff., (D12/-); BMC Macedonia p. 40, 27; Varbanov II 3669 (R4); SNG Cop 169; Lindgren 1086 (none with this reverse die), F, well centered, green patina, centration dimple on reverse, large pit on reverse, weight 10.085 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 0o, Edessa mint, obverse AV K M AN ΓOP∆IANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse E∆ECCAIΩN, Roma seated left on shield, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, Nike in right hand, parazonium in left hand; Tyche standing behind Roma, wearing turreted crown, crowning Roma with a wreath in her right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $60.00 (53.40)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RP83478. Bronze AE 24, Touratsoglou 158 (V25/R55), McClean 3793, Varbanov 4416 (R6), Moushmov 6753, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, BMC Macedonia -, F, green patina, a few minor scratches, edge bump, weight 6.654 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 90o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, obverse AV K M AVP ANTΩNINOC, laureate head right; reverse ΘECCAΛONKEΩN, Nike standing right, left foot on helmet, shield held with both hands and resting on left knee; $150.00 (133.50)




  







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