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Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.|, denarius
Annona was the goddess of harvest and her main attribute is grain. This reverse suggests the arrival of grain by sea from the provinces (especially from Africa) and its distribution to the people.
RS94712. Silver denarius, RIC III 260, RSC II 1016, BMCRE IV 883, SRCV II 4128, Hunter II 106, VF, nice portrait, flow lines, some die wear, some of obverse legend unstruck probably due to filled die, small edge cracks, weight 3.287 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 156 - 157 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS IMP II, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XX COS IIII, Annona standing right, left foot on prow, rudder in right hand, modius overflowing with grain balanced on left knee with left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, denarius
Pudicitia, modesty and chastity, was for Romans the highest regarded female virtue. For an unmarried girl, pudicitia meant virginity. For a wife, it meant faithfulness and devotion to her husband. Romans loved the story of Arria, an ultimate example of Roman pudicitia. When the emperor Claudius ordered her husband Paetus to end his own life, he hesitated. Arria took his dagger and stabbed herself to set an example, saying, "Paetus, it doesn't hurt."
RS94713. Silver denarius, RIC IV S576, RSC III 168, BMCRE V S74, Hunter III 29, SRCV II -, Choice gVF, lovely portrait, well centered, light flow lines, some porosity, edge cracks, weight 1.808 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 193 - 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse PVDICITA, Pudicitia enthroned left, veiled, right hand on breast, left elbow resting on back of throne; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, denarius
Pudicitia, modesty and chastity, was for Romans the highest regarded female virtue. For an unmarried girl, pudicitia meant virginity. For a wife, it meant faithfulness and devotion to her husband. Romans loved the story of Arria, an ultimate example of Roman pudicitia. When the emperor Claudius ordered her husband Paetus to end his own life, he hesitated. Arria took his dagger and stabbed herself to set an example, saying, "Paetus, it doesn't hurt."
RS94714. Silver denarius, RIC IV S576, RSC III 168, BMCRE V S74., Hunter III 29, SRCV II -, VF, well centered, flow lines, a little rough and porous, edge a little ragged, weight 3.180 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 193 - 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse PVDICITA, Pudicitia enthroned left, veiled, right hand on breast, left elbow resting on back of throne; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, denarius
During the reign of Commodus, in 179 A.D., Lucius Septimius Severus arrived at Antioch to take command of Legio IV Scythica. The citizens of Antioch ridiculed Septimius Severus. Later, when Septimius Severus was emperor, although he would forgive many who supported Niger, he did not forgive Antioch and deprived the city of many privileges.
RS94705. Silver denarius, RSC II 775, RIC III M666, BMCRE IV M801, VF, nice youthful portrait, flow lines, some porosity, tight irregularly shaped flan cutting of parts of legend, weight 3.287 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 179 A.D.; obverse L AVREL COMMODVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TR P IIII IMP III COS II P P, Victory seated left, patera in right hand, palm in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

|Marcus| |Aurelius|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.|, denarius
Virtus (courage, valor) is depicted as a helmeted soldier, often a female, in armor holding a spear, parazonium, victory or a shield. Virtus and Mars can usually be distinguished since Mars is usually shown nude and Virtus is always shown clothed.
RS94708. Silver denarius, RIC III A473, RSC II 721, BMCRE IV A893, Hunter II 21, Strack III A219, SRCV II 4793, gF, flow lines, tight flan, light scratches, small edge cracks, weight 3.007 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 156 - 157 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAES ANTONIVS PII F, bare head right; reverse TR POT XI COS II, Virtus standing slightly left, head left, wearing crested helmet and military garb, parazonium in extended right hand, vertical spear with point on both ends in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.|, denarius
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RS94710. Silver denarius, RIC III 200c, RSC II 582, BMCRE IV 729, Strack III 229, SRCV II 4095, Hunter II -, F, radiating flow lines, scratches and bumps, edge cracks, weight 2.402 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 150 - 151 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES T AEL HADR ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XIIII COS IIII, Pax standing half left, head left, olive branch downward in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, PAX in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, denarius
Laodicea ad Mare is today Latakia, Syria. It was a Phoenician town, refounded by Seleucus I Nicator 301-281 B.C. and renamed after his mother, Laodicea. Coins of Julia Domna from the Laodicea mint can be identified by the loop coming up from her drapery at the neck.
RS94711. Silver denarius, RIC IV S637, RSC III 21, BMCRE V S593, SRCV II 6577, Hunter III 63, VF, lovely portrait, well centered, much of obverse legend unstruck probably due to a filled die, reverse die worn, weight 2.209 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 196 - 202 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Concordia seated left, patera in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, sestertius
This type was issued to commemorate victory in Britain. Between 208 and 210 A.D., Septimius Severus and his son Caracalla campaigned into Scotland (then Caledonia) and also restored Hadrian's Wall. The victories in the north pacified the island for the remainder of the century, but the aged Septimius died at Eburacum (York) in 211 A.D.
RB93001. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 796 (R); Hunter III 164; Cohen IV 547; SRCV II 6430; BMCRE V p. 393, 185 var. (slight drapery), aF, corrosion, a few deep cuts, scratches, flan crack, light deposits, weight 21.379 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 210 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XVIII COS III P P S C, two Victories standing facing each other, attaching round shield to palm tree, two British captives seated back to back at the base of the palm, each wearing tunic and peaked cap; rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, denarius
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. She was the goddess of health, cleanliness and sanitation. While her father was more directly associated with healing, she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health. Her name is the source of the word "hygiene."
RS94701. Silver denarius, RSC II 762b; Hunter II 13; SRCV II 5702; RIC III M649 var. (draped); BMCRE IV p. 503, M780 (draped), VF, nice young portrait, flow lines, slight porosity, uneven tone, edge ragged with cracks, weight 3.011 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec 177 - Dec 178 A.D.; obverse L AVREL COMMODVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TR P III IMP II COS P P, Salus seated left, branch extended in right hand, left arm rests on chair, snake rising up from the ground before her; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, denarius
Pax (Peace), regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RS94702. Silver denarius, RIC III 17, RSC II 806, BMCRE 63, SRCV II 5708, Hunter V -, gVF, nice portrait, radiating flow lines, reverse slightly off center, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.561 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 181 A.D.; obverse M COMMODVS ANTONINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TR P VI IMP IIII COS III P P, Pax standing half left, head left, olive branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00




  







Catalog current as of Monday, February 24, 2020.
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