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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheLateEmpire>Honorius PAGE 2/1412345

Honorius, 23 January 393 - 15 August 423 A.D.

Honorius was the son of Theodosius I and upon the latter's death was given the Western provinces to rule as emperor, while his brother Arcadius was given the East. Honorius was a weak incompetent ruler dominated at first by the famed general Stilicho, then by various court favorites. In August 410 A.D. he sat helpless at Ravenna while Rome was sacked by the Goths. He was succeeded by Valentinian III.The Roman Empire 395 AD


Click for a larger photo In 401, when the Visigoths under King Alaric I entered Italy, Honorius moved his capital from Mediolanum to the coastal city of Ravenna, which was protected by a ring of marshes and strong fortifications. Because it was so secure, Ravenna remained the capital until the overthrow of the last western Roman Emperor in 476, then became the capital of the Ostrogothic Kingdom in Italy, and later was the seat of the Byzantine exarchs. While the new capital was easier to defend, it was poorly located for Roman forces to protect central Italy. On 24 August 410 Rome was sacked by the Visigoths.
SH12129. Gold solidus, RIC X 1328, EF, weight 4.449 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Ravenna mint, 402 - 408 A.D.; obverse D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORI-A AVGGG, Honorius standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, treading down captive; R-V across fields, COMOB in ex; SOLD

Click for a larger photo Honorius ruled the Western provinces, while his brother Arcadius ruled the East. Honorius was a weak incompetent ruler dominated at first by the famed general Stilicho, then by various court favorites. In August 410 A.D., he sat helpless at Ravenna while Rome was sacked by the Goths. His rule was among the longest of all the Roman emperors.
SH12495. Gold solidus, RIC X 1319, VF, weight 4.115 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Ravenna mint, obverse D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORI-A AVGGG, Honorius standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, treading down captive; R-V across fields, COMOB in ex; scarce; SOLD

Click for a larger photo
SH12116. Gold tremissis, RIC X 1215, gem EF, weight 1.49 g, maximum diameter 13mm mm, die axis 0o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 398 A.D.; obverse D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory advancing right holding wreath and globus cruciger; M-D across fields, COM in ex; near perfect centering, bold strike, lustrous; scarce; SOLD

Click for a larger photo
SH17768. Gold solidus, RIC X 1206, EF, weight 4.463 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, c. 395 - 402 A.D.; obverse D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORI-A AVGGG, Honorius treading right foot on captive, standard in right, Victory on globe in left, M-D across fields, COMOB in ex; nice strike with excellent centering, graffiti "X" right obverse field and small "x" at top rim on reverse; SOLD

Click for a larger photo In 401, when the Visigoths under King Alaric I entered Italy, Honorius moved his capital from Mediolanum to the coastal city of Ravenna, which was protected by a ring of marshes and strong fortifications. Because it was so secure, Ravenna remained the capital until the overthrow of the last western Roman Emperor in 476, then became the capital of the Ostrogothic Kingdom in Italy, and later was the seat of the Byzantine exarchs. While the new capital was easier to defend, it was poorly located for Roman forces to protect central Italy. On 24 August 410 Rome was sacked by the Visigoths.
SH05310. Gold solidus, RIC X 1323, Cohen 44, gVF, weight 4.41 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Ravenna mint, 402 - 403 or 405 - 406 A.D.; obverse D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORI-A AVGGG, Honorius standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, treading down captive; R-V across fields, COMOB in ex; rare; SOLD

Click for a larger photo
SH07624. Gold solidus, RIC X 1206d, EF, weight 21.7 g, maximum diameter 4.42 mm, die axis 180o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 402 - 408 A.D.; obverse D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORI-A AVGGG, emperor standing right standard in right and Victory on globe in left, with left foot spurns captive, M - D accross fields, COMOB in exergue; wavy flan and flan flaw on reverse 3:00 edge; SOLD

Click for a larger photo In 1972, a construction worker at Sremska Mitrovica (ancient Sirmium) accidentally broke into an old Roman pot, about 2 meters deep. Inside, in a leather pouch, were 33 Roman gold coins minted at Sirmium. The pot was inside a Roman house wall and probably held the hidden savings of a wealthy Roman family. Ironically, the worker's name was Zlatenko (meaning Golden or Golden Man in Serbian).
SH43076. Gold solidus, RIC IX 14d, aVF, holed, wavy, weight 4.370 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, 393 - 395 A.D.; obverse D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTOR-IA AVGGG Z, Honorius standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, treading down captive, S-M across fields, COMOB in ex; SOLD

Click for a larger photo
SH11127. Gold solidus, RIC X 24, VF, weight 4.202 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople mint, 402 - c. 403 A.D.; obverse D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, helmeted bust facing, diademed, cuirassed, spear in right over right shoulder behind head, shield decorated with horseman on left arm; reverse CONCORDIA AVGGG ∆, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, holding long scepter and Victory on globe, foot on prow, CONOB in ex; graffiti on obverse; rare (R2); SOLD

Honorius, 23 January 393 - 15 August 423 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Part of a very interesting barbarous issue that combined the GLORIA ROMANORVM (Emperor dragging captive) and REPARATIO REIPVB (Emperor raising kneeling woman) reverses into a single one. The style of our coin is remarkable for the issue. Although these were probably minted in the Rhine region, our coin was found in the Middle East!
RL12042. Bronze AE 3, RIC X 1355, VF, weight 2.71 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rhine frontier barbarous mint, c. 390 - 400 A.D.; obverse D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA RO-MANORVM, Emperor standing right, head left, right hand on head of woman, with left dragging captive; attractive style and nice desert patina; rare; SOLD

Click for a larger photo In 401, when the Visigoths under King Alaric I entered Italy, Honorius moved his capital from Mediolanum to the coastal city of Ravenna, which was protected by a ring of marshes and strong fortifications. Because it was so secure, Ravenna remained the capital until the overthrow of the last western Roman Emperor in 476, then became the capital of the Ostrogothic Kingdom in Italy, and later was the seat of the Byzantine exarchs. While the new capital was easier to defend, it was poorly located for Roman forces to protect central Italy. On 24 August 410 Rome was sacked by the Visigoths.
RL01344. Silver half siliqua, RSC X 12, VF, weight 15.5 g, maximum diameter 0.9 mm, die axis 0o, Ravenna mint, obverse D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, Roma seated facing on throne, head left; SOLD



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Obverse legends:

DNHONORIVSPFAVG



Catalog current as of Thursday, April 17, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Honorius