Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Please login or register to use this function! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Please login or register to use this function! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ AntiochView Options:  |  |  |     

Antioch, Syria (Antakiyah, Turkey)

Because of Egypt's isolated position, Antioch was a more suitable capital for the eastern empire than Alexandria, and to some extent the Roman emperors tried to make the city an eastern Rome. They built a great temple to Jupiter Capitolinus, a forum, a theater, a circus, baths and aqueducts. The city was, however, repeatedly damaged by earthquakes. Edward Gibbon wrote of Antioch: "Fashion was the only law, pleasure the only pursuit, and the splendour of dress and furniture was the only distinction of the citizens of Antioch. The arts of luxury were honoured, the serious and manly virtues were the subject of ridicule, and the contempt for female modesty and reverent age announced the universal corruption of the capital of the East." Antioch was, paradoxically, also an important hub of early Christianity. The city had a large population of Jews and so attracted the earliest missionaries; including Peter, Barnabas, and also Paul during his first missionary journey. Antioch's converts were the first to be called Christians. Late in 311, an embassy from Antioch presented themselves before Maximinus and requested permission to banish Christians from their city. Maximinus initially agreed, but in May 313 restored privileges and property to Christians. Antioch struck coins for provincial Syria before becoming and imperial mint. Imperial mint dates of operation: 217 - 611 A.D. Mintmarks: AN, ANT, ANTOB, SMAN.


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RS73522. Silver denarius, RIC IV 190, RSC III 54, BMCRE V 281, Hunter III 116, SRCV II 7517, VF, exotic eastern style, weight 2.751 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 218 - 219 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse HILARITAS AVG, Hilaritas standing front, looking left, patera in right, long grounded palm frond in left, flanked by two nude children standing at her feet reaching up to her, the child on the right touching the palm frond; $135.00 (120.15)


Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This coin, dedicated by the reverse legend to the health of the emperor, indicates Claudius was ill and vows had been made to Apollo, the god of medicine, for his recovery. Apollo and Diana were fraternal twins, and had a good sibling relationship. Perhaps she was also asked to help the emperor. Unfortunately, Apollo and Diane could not help Claudius. He died of the plague soon after this coin was struck.
RA77133. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1088 (7 spec.), Huvelin NAC XIX 62, RIC V 219, Cohen VI 260, SRCV III 11369 var., F, well centered, highlighting earthen fill, cleaning scratches, weight 3.915 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 4, c. mid 270; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left; reverse SALVS AVG, Diana on left, standing right, drawing arrow from quiver with right hand, bow in left hand, facing Apollo, on right, standing left, olive branch in right hand, lyre resting on rock behind in left hand; rare; $125.00 (111.25)


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 293, Diocletian's Palace was built at a small bay on the Dalmatian coast, four miles from Salona, today's Split, Croatia.
RA71999. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 322; SRCV IV 12637; Cohen VI 34; Hunter IV 67 var. (also 10th officina, but no pellet in exergue), aEF, well centered, good strike, some silvering, a few light marks, light deposits and porosity, weight 3.741 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 315o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 293 - 295 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian (on left) standing right, holding parazonium in his left hand, receiving Victory holding wreath on globe from Jupiter, who is standing left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, holding a long scepter vertically behind in his left hand, I in center, XXI in exergue; $110.00 (97.90)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 231, Severus Alexander led a formidable army into the east. In a great battle Alexander defeated Artaxerxes and drove him back from the frontiers of Rome. He returned to Rome, where he received a triumph for his victory over the Persians.
RS73592. Silver denarius, RSC III 561, RIC IV 302, BMCRE VI 1020, Hunter III 190 var. (no cuirass), cf. SRCV II 7930 (obv legend, star right on rev, etc.), VF, well centered, interesting eastern style, weight 2.643 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 228 - 231 A.D.; obverse IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, wreath raised in right hand, palm frond in left over shoulder; $110.00 (97.90)


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 8 October 314, at the Battle of Cibalae, Constantine defeated Licinius near Colonia Aurelia Cibalae (modern Vinkovci, Croatia). Licinius was forced to flee to Sirmium, and lost all of the Balkans except for Thrace. The two Augusti initiated peace negotiations, but they failed and they would not make peace until 1 March 317.
RB71428. Billon follis, RIC VII Antioch 8 (R4), SRCV IV I5244, Cohen VII 108, gVF, nice portrait, well centered on a crowded flan, weight 4.105 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 313 - 314 A.D.; obverse IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulders, Victory on globe in right offering wreath, long scepter vertical behind in left, eagle at feet with wreath in beak, wreath over H over III in right field, ANT in exergue; $100.00 (89.00)




    



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Saturday, August 27, 2016.
Page created in 1.263 seconds
Antioch