FORVM ANCIENT COINS
To the glory that was Greece
And the grandeour that was Rome
FORVM ANCIENT COINS Consignment Shop
  Please login or register to use this function! All items guaranteed authentic for eternity!
Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Roman Coins
Roman Coins Showcase


Catalog Search
View Shopping Cart
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Contact Us
FAQ
Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>RomanMints>Antioch PAGE 3/1012345

Antioch, Syria (Antakiyah, Turkey)

Because of Egypt's isolated position, Antioch was a more suitable capital for the eastern empire than Alexandria, and to some extent the Roman emperors tried to make the city an eastern Rome. They built a great temple to Jupiter Capitolinus, a forum, a theater, a circus, baths and aqueducts. The city was, however, repeatedly damaged by earthquakes. Edward Gibbon wrote of Antioch: "Fashion was the only law, pleasure the only pursuit, and the splendour of dress and furniture was the only distinction of the citizens of Antioch. The arts of luxury were honoured, the serious and manly virtues were the subject of ridicule, and the contempt for female modesty and reverent age announced the universal corruption of the capital of the East." Antioch was, paradoxically, also an important hub of early Christianity. The city had a large population of Jews and so attracted the earliest missionaries; including Peter, Barnabas, and also Paul during his first missionary journey. Antioch's converts were the first to be called Christians. Late in 311, an embassy from Antioch presented themselves before Maximinus and requested permission to banish Christians from their city. Maximinus initially agreed, but in May 313 restored privileges and property to Christians. Antioch struck coins for provincial Syria before becoming and imperial mint. Imperial mint dates of operation: 217 - 611 A.D. Mintmarks: AN, ANT, ANTOB, SMAN.


Macrianus, Summer 260 - Early Summer 261 A.D.

Click for a larger photo Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.SH73066. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 8a, RIC V 9, SRCV III 10803, F, weight 3.765 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter seated left, patera in extended right, scepter in left, eagle at feet, star upper left; rare; $120.00 (104.40)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

Click for a larger photo The reverse legend abbreviates Clementia Temporum, which can be translated "a time of peace and calm."RS65435. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 921, Choice EF, weight 4.138 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP, emperor standing right receiving globe from Jupiter standing left holding long scepter behind in left, A in center, XXI in ex; $115.00 (100.05)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Click for a larger photo  RL65366. Bronze AE 3, RIC VII Antioch 86, Choice aEF, attractive black patina with highlighting red earthen desert fill, weight 2.670 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 330 - 335 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers standing facing, flanking two standards in center, heads confronted, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, SMANB in ex; $110.00 (95.70)


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

Click for a larger photo A sum of Greek numerals E (5) and ∆ (4) is used to indicate the 9th officina in order to avoid using Θ (9). Because they sound alike, theta (Θ) was associated with Thanatos, the daemon personification of death. Theta used as a warning symbol of death, in the same way that skull and crossbones are used in modern times. It survives on potsherds used by Athenians voting for the death penalty. Also, after a funeral "Nine Days of Sorrow," were solemnly observed by the family. Romans avoided the use of theta, as we avoid the use of the number 13 today.
RA72411. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 322, Cohen VI 34, Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, near full silvering, weight 4.120 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, 9th officina Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 293 - 295 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter, E∆ (officina 9) in center, XXI in exergue; $110.00 (95.70)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Click for a larger photo In 336, Constantine reconquered most of Dacia for the Roman Empire.
RL72428. Billon AE 3, RIC VII Antioch 108, LRBC 1363, SRCV IV 16374, Cohen VII 250, aMS, weight 1.693 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 270o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 336 - 337 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers standing facing, flanking a standard in center, heads confronted, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, SMANA in ex; ex Robert T. Golan; $110.00 (95.70)




ITEMS PER PAGE 13510203050 PAGE 3/1012345


OUR FINEST COINS ARE LISTED FIRST. CLICK TO THE LAST PAGE FOR OUR BARGAINS.

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Saturday, April 18, 2015.
Page created in 1.747 seconds
Antioch