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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ AntiochView Options:  |  |  |     

Antioch, Syria (Antakiyah, Turkey)

Because of Egypt's isolated position, Antioch was a more suitable capital for the eastern empire than Alexandria, and to some extent the Roman emperors tried to make the city an eastern Rome. They built a great temple to Jupiter Capitolinus, a forum, a theater, a circus, baths and aqueducts. The city was, however, repeatedly damaged by earthquakes. Edward Gibbon wrote of Antioch: "Fashion was the only law, pleasure the only pursuit, and the splendour of dress and furniture was the only distinction of the citizens of Antioch. The arts of luxury were honoured, the serious and manly virtues were the subject of ridicule, and the contempt for female modesty and reverent age announced the universal corruption of the capital of the East." Antioch was, paradoxically, also an important hub of early Christianity. The city had a large population of Jews and so attracted the earliest missionaries; including Peter, Barnabas, and also Paul during his first missionary journey. Antioch's converts were the first to be called Christians. Late in 311, an embassy from Antioch presented themselves before Maximinus and requested permission to banish Christians from their city. Maximinus initially agreed, but in May 313 restored privileges and property to Christians. Antioch struck coins for provincial Syria before becoming and imperial mint. Imperial mint dates of operation: 217 - 611 A.D. Mintmarks: AN, ANT, ANTOB, SMAN.


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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The reverse legend abbreviates Clementia Temporum, which can be translated "a time of peace and calm."
RS65435. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 921, Choice EF, weight 4.138 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP (time of peace and calm), emperor standing right receiving globe from Jupiter standing left holding long scepter behind in left, A in center, XXI in exergue; $90.00 (80.10)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus, were the twin sons of the Vestal Virgin Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war, Mars. They were abandoned in the Tiber as infants. Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned, was on the shore overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Romulus was the first King of Rome.
RA73653. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1628c, RSC IV 46b, RIC V S628, Hunter IV S194, SRCV III 10171 var. (cuirassed bust left), gVF, full circles strike on a broad flan, much silvering, porous, weight 3.435 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 264 - 265 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse AETERNITAS AVG, she-wolf standing right, head left, the twins Romulus and Remus suckling below, palm branch right in exergue; $85.00 (75.65)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Virtus is the personification of valor and courage. Valor was, of course, essential for the success of a Roman emperor and Virtus was one of the embodiments of virtues that were part of the Imperial cult. During his joint reign with his father, Gallienus proved his courage in battle; but his failure to liberate his father from Persian captivity was perceived as cowardice and a disgrace to the Emperor and Empire. It was not, however, actually fear that prevented a rescue. While others mourned Valerian's fate, Gallienus rejoiced in his new sovereignty.
RA77437. Silvered antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1666k, RIC V S612, Cohen V 1245, SRCV III 10403, Choice EF, near full silvering with some luster, excellent centering, parts of legends weak, slight porosity, weight 3.567 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 267 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG, Soldier standing right, spear vertical behind with point up in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PXV in exergue; $85.00 (75.65)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The reverse probably advertises the resettlement and protection of Christian Goths in 348. Persecuted by the Gothic chieftain Athanaric, Wulfila obtained permission from Constantius II to migrate with his flock of converts to Moesia. They settled near Nicopolis ad Istrum.
RL77932. Billon light maiorina, RIC VIII Antioch 126, LRBC II 2615, Voetter 12, SRCV V 18700, Cohen VII 18, gVF, attractive style, area of light corrosion on obverse, tight flan, weight 4.347 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, globe in right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Constans walking right, looking back, wearing helmet and military garb, with right hand leading barbarian from hut under tree, spear in left hand, ANS in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $85.00 (75.65)


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RP57232. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1135(f); Prieur 546; BMC Galatia p. 220, 583; Dura Coins 524, aVF, weight 12.226 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT K Γ ME KY ∆EKIOC TPAIANOC CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind, S below bust; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC, S C, eagle standing left on palm branch, head left, wings spread, wreath in beak; scarce; $80.00 (71.20)




    



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REFERENCES

Huvelin, H. "L'atelier d'Antioche sous Claude II" in NAC XIX (1990), pp. 251-271.
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Prieur, M. & K. Prieur. The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their fractions from 57 BC to AD 258. (Lancaster, PA, 2000).
Van Heesch, J. "The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza (AD 312)" in Numismatic Chronicle 1993, pp. 65 - 75, pl. 11.

Catalog current as of Thursday, December 08, 2016.
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Antioch