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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Olympians ▸ Artemis or DianaView Options:  |  |  |     

Artemis or Diana

Virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon. Symbols include the deer and the bow. Twin sister of Apollo. Daughter of Zeus and Leto.


Thasos, Thrace, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Thasos had been subject to Persia, Sparta, Athens or Macedonia for most of its history. After the Battle of Cynoscephalae in 197 B.C., Rome granted Thasos its "freedom." It was still a "free" state in the time of Pliny, the 1st century A.D. Of course, Thasos was "free" under Rome only in much the same way that Rome was a "republic" under Augustus and the emperors.
GB67669. Bronze AE 20, BMC Thrace p. 225, 105; SNG Cop 1057 - 1059 var. (monogram); Le Rider Thasiennes, p. 189, pl. V, 60 ff. var. (same); SNG Evelpidis 1107 var. (same), F, green patina, weight 7.485 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thasos mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder; reverse ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing right, drawing bow about to shoot an arrow, nude but for lion's skin tied around neck and falling over his shoulders, monogram right; rare; $125.00 (111.25)


Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

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This coin, dedicated by the reverse legend to the health of the emperor, indicates Claudius was ill and vows had been made to Apollo, the god of medicine, for his recovery. Apollo and Diana were fraternal twins, and had a good sibling relationship. Perhaps she was also asked to help the emperor. Unfortunately, Apollo and Diane could not help Claudius. He died of the plague soon after this coin was struck.
RA77133. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1088 (7 spec.), Huvelin NAC XIX 62, RIC V 219, Cohen VI 260, SRCV III 11369 var., F, well centered, highlighting earthen fill, cleaning scratches, weight 3.915 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 4, c. mid 270; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left; reverse SALVS AVG, Diana on left, standing right, drawing arrow from quiver with right hand, bow in left hand, facing Apollo, on right, standing left, olive branch in right hand, lyre resting on rock behind in left hand; rare; $125.00 (111.25)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP77235. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1630; SNG ANS 162; SNG Cop 92; AMNG III 71; BMC Macedonia p. 52, 76; Varbanov III 3117 (R5), aVF, nice green patina, weight 8.974 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right; reverse ∆HMOY AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos seated facing riding on bull galloping right, holding billowing veil with both hands; $125.00 (111.25)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS77605. Silver drachm, Price 1387, Mller Alexander 614, SNG Cop 888, SNG Alpha Bank 582, SNG Mnchen 451, aVF, scratches and marks, porosity, weight 4.051 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 270o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle extended in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, Pegasos forepart left in left field, Artemis standing left holding torch under throne; $125.00 (111.25)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP77237. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 1633; SNG ANS 170; SNG Cop 96; Varbanov III 3141; BMC Macedonia p. 53, 82, VF, green patina, weight 9.004 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, holding billowing inflated veil overhead with both hands; $120.00 (106.80)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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Lucifer means lightbringer, from the Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bear or bring." "Lucifer" is found in only one place in the Bible, Isaiah 14:12, but only in the King James and related versions: "How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! The King James Version is based on the Vulgate, the Latin translation of Jerome. Jerome translated the Hebrew helel (bright or brilliant one) as "lucifer," which was a reasonable Latin equivalent. And yet it is this lucifer, the bright one or lightbearer, that became a name for Satan, Lord of Darkness.
RS75221. Silver denarius, RIC IV 127 (R), RSC IV 69, Hunter III 47, SRCV III 8673, Choice gVF, excellent portrait, perfect centering, some small encrustations, weight 2.978 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, issued for wedding to Tranquillina, 241 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing right, lit long transverse torch right in both hands; $115.00 (102.35)


Orchomenos, Arcadia, Greece, 370 - 340 A.D.

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Kallisto, the daughter of King Lykaon of Arcadia, was seduced and impregnated by Zeus. Caught in the act, jealous Hera angrily transformed her into a bear and persuaded Artemis to shoot her. Zeus had Hermes recover the child Arkas from her womb and transformed Kallisto into the constellation Ursa Major. Arkas grew up to become the eponymous founder and king of the Arkadians. Upon his death, he was placed in the heavens beside his mother as Ursa Minor.

In another version of the myth, Kallisto, as a companion of Artemis, vowed to remain a virgin, but was seduced and impregnated by Zeus. Artemis seeing her condition in the bath, in anger, changed her into a bear. When her son Arkas was grown, Kallisto wandered into the sanctuary of Zeus Lykaios. Arkas, not recognizing his mother, would have killed her, but Zeus immediately transformed the pair into Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.
GB62604. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Peloponnesos 1575, SNG Cop 265, VF, weight 5.317 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 270o, Orchomenos mint, 370 - 340 A.D.; obverse EPXOMEN−IΩN APKAΣ, Artemis kneeling right, holding bow, hound seated right behind her; reverse Kallisto seated left, falling backwards with arms outstretched, an arrow piercing her breast, the infant Arkas below her lying on his back reaching upward toward Kallisto; very rare; $110.00 (97.90)


Kyme, Aiolis, c. 165 - 85 B.C.

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Kyme was conquered by Croesus, king of Lydia, and ruled successively by the Persians, Macedonians, Seleucids, and Pergamenes. Attalus III, the last king of Pergamum, bequeathed Aeolis to Rome in 133 B.C. Shortly afterward, it was made part of the Roman province of Asia. Aeolis was under Byzantine rule until the early 15th century, when the Ottoman Turks occupied the area.
GB71582. Bronze AE 18, SNG Cop 108; SNGvA 1642; SNG Mnchen 507; BMC Troas p. 113, 87; Klein 336; SGCV II 4193, VF, nice style and patina, weight 3.400 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme mint, c. 165 - 85 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder; reverse Oinochoe (one-handled vase) between two laurel branches, KY above, I−Ω/I−Λ/O−Σ (Zoilos, magistrate) in three lines across inner field flanking vase; $110.00 (97.90)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP77232. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 1633; SNG ANS 170; SNG Cop 96; Varbanov III 3141; BMC Macedonia p. 53, 82, VF, light green patina, a little off center, weight 8.587 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, holding billowing inflated veil overhead with both hands; $95.00 (84.55)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP77233. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 1633; SNG ANS 170; SNG Cop 96; Varbanov III 3141; BMC Macedonia p. 53, 82, VF, green patina, weight 8.719 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, holding billowing inflated veil overhead with both hands; $95.00 (84.55)




    



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Artemis or Diana