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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Olympians ▸ Artemis or DianaView Options:  |  |  | ◁◁      ▷▷

Artemis or Diana

Virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon. Symbols include the deer and the bow. Twin sister of Apollo. Daughter of Zeus and Leto.


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C.

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Eγλογισ (eglogis) means elected in Greek and was presumably the magistrate's title.
GB69808. Bronze AE 20, cf. SNG Cop 182; SNG Tüb 3971; BMC Phrygia p. 81, 67 ff. var (magistrate); SNGvA 3740 f. var (same), gVF, weight 5.721 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia mint, c. 133 - 48 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse AΠAME / KANKAΠOY / EΓΛOΓIΣ, facing cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis, veiled, arms extended with supports; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $120.00 (€104.40)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Perge, Pamphylia

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The monumental fountain or nymphaeum of Perga consists of a wide pool, and behind it a two-storeyed richly worked facade. From its inscription, it is apparent that the structure was dedicated to Artemis Pergaia, Septimius Severus, his wife Julia Domna, and their sons. An inscription belonging to the facade, various facade fragments, and marble statues of Septimius Severus and his wife, all found in excavations of the nymphaeum, are now in the Antalya Museum. Nymphaeum of Perge
RP69817. Bronze AE 18, SNG Cop 323 var (CEB), Lindgren A1108A var (same), SNG Pfälzer 317 var (same), SNG BnF -, BMC Lycia -, SGICV -, Nice aVF, weight 4.618 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Perga mint, obverse IOYΛIA ∆OMNA CE, draped bust right; reverse ΠEPΓAMΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing long chiton, hair in bun, arrow downward at side in right, bow in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; very rare; $95.00 (€82.65)


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C.

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Artemis was a goddess of virginity, women's concerns, the hunt and the underworld. The enigmatic cult statue covered in apparent fertility symbols was a unique combination of the Greek virgin-huntress Artemis with an indigenous Anatolian goddess.
GB90785. Bronze AE 20, BMC Phrygia p. 76, 40 - 42; SGCV II 5121, VF, obverse attractively off-center, green patina with earthen highlighting, weight 7.958 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia mint, c. 133 - 48 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse AΠAME AN∆PON AΛKIO, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis facing; $95.00 (€82.65)


Leontini, Sicily, 2nd Century B.C.

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In 214 B.C., Roman forces lead by Marcus Claudius Marcellus stormed Leontini, which had been subject to Syracuse. Marcellus executed 2000 Roman deserters who were hiding in the city and then moved to lay siege to Syracuse. The siege would last for two years, thwarted in part by the military machines created by the famous inventor Archimedes.
GB69013. Bronze AE 22, Calciati III p. 85, 21; SNG Cop 362, SNG München 572, HGC 2 715 (R1); SNG Morcom -, aVF, green patina, uneven strike with weak areas, weight 8.810 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 45o, Leontini mint, Roman rule, 2nd century B.C.; obverse laureate bust of Artemis (or Apollo) right, quiver behind shoulder; reverse ΛEONTIN−ΩN (clockwise from upper right), Demeter standing left, grain ears upward in extended right, long long torch vertical behind in left, plough at feet left; rare; $80.00 (€69.60)


Kyme, Aiolis, c. 165 - 85 B.C.

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Kyme was conquered by Croesus, king of Lydia, and ruled successively by the Persians, Macedonians, Seleucids, and Pergamenes. Attalus III, the last king of Pergamum, bequeathed Aeolis to Rome in 133 B.C. Shortly afterward, it was made part of the Roman province of Asia. Aeolis was under Byzantine rule until the early 15th century, when the Ottoman Turks occupied the area.
GB72658. Bronze AE 18, SNG Cop 108; SNGvA 1642; SNG München 507; BMC Troas p. 113, 87; Klein 336; SGCV II 4193, VF, excellent strike, light cleaning scratches, weight 3.014 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme mint, c. 165 - 85 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder; reverse Oinochoe (one-handled vase) between two laurel branches, KY above, I−Ω/I−Λ/O−Σ (Zoilos, magistrate) in three lines across inner field flanking vase; ex Roger Liles Collection; $80.00 (€69.60)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP74291. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1633; SNG ANS 170; SNG Cop 96; Varbanov III 3141; BMC Macedonia p. 53, 82, aVF, green patina, porous, weight 9.092 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, obverse TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, holding billowing inflated veil overhead with both hands; $80.00 (€69.60)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Ionia

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"..the temple of Artemis Leukophryene, which in the size of its shrine and in the number of its votive offerings is inferior to the temple at Ephesos, but in the harmony and skill shown in the structure of the sacred enclosure is far superior to it. And in size it surpasses all the sacred enclosures in Asia except two, that at Ephesos (to Artemis) and that at Didymoi (to Apollo)" (Strabo, Geography 14. 1. 40).
RP58788. Bronze AE 28, Schultz Magnesia 113 (R4), Imhoof MG 311, RPC Online -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG München -, BMC Ionia -, et al. -, aF, weight 12.155 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, magistrate Diophantus; as caesar, 139 - 161 A.D.; obverse M AIΛIOC AYPHΛIOC BHPOC KAICAP, bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed young bust right; reverse ΓPAM ∆IOΦAN TOY MAΓNHTΩN, facing cult statue of Artemis Leukophryene, wearing polos and veil, flanked by two Nikes over shoulders crowning her, eagles with open wings at feet; very rare; $70.00 (€60.90)


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C.

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Artemis was a goddess of virginity, women's concerns, the hunt and the underworld. The enigmatic cult statue covered in apparent fertility symbols was a unique combination of the Greek virgin-huntress Artemis with an indigenous Anatolian goddess.
GB70874. Bronze AE 22, BMC Phrygia p. 84, 88; SGCV II 5121, aVF, weight 6.209 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia mint, c. 133 - 48 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse AΠAME − MHNO∆O/MENEMA, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis facing; $65.00 (€56.55)


Abydos, Troas, c. 320 - 200 B.C.

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Leander fell in love with Hero and would swim every night across the Hellespont to be with her. Hero would light a lamp at the top of her tower to guide his way. Succumbing to Leander's soft words and to his argument that Venus, as the goddess of love, would scorn the worship of a virgin, Hero allowed him to make love to her. These trysts lasted through the warm summer. But one stormy winter night, the waves tossed Leander in the sea and the breezes blew out Hero's light. Leander lost his way and was drowned. When Hero saw his dead body, she threw herself over the edge of the tower to her death to be with him.
JD73131. Bronze AE 11, SNG Cop 4; cf. BMC Troas p. 5, 47 (AE13, star right on rev, etc.), SNG München 25 var (same), F, weight 1.183 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, die axis 0o, Abydos mint, c. 320 - 200 B.C.; obverse diademed (or laureate) head of Artemis (or Apollo) right, quiver on shoulder behind; reverse eagle standing right, ABY upper left; rare; $65.00 (€56.55)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathocles, 317 - 289 B.C.

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With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GB68170. Bronze litra, Calciati II p. 277, 142; SNG ANS 708 ff.; SNG Cop 779; BMC Sicily p. 199; 422 ff.; SGCV I 1200; HGC 2 1537 (S), aF, rough, weight 7.502 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, 317 - 289 B.C.; obverse ΣΩTEIPA, draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; reverse AΓAΘOKΛEOΣ / BAΣIΛEΩΣ, winged thunderbolt; $60.00 (€52.20)


Phygela, Ionia, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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Phygela was a small coastal town south-west of Ephesos.
GB57536. Bronze AE 11, SNGvA 2149; BMC Ionia p. 228, 1 ff. var. (no Γ); SNG Cop 1072 var (monogram vice astragalos); Lindgren -, VF, weight 1.315 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Phygela mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Artemis Munychia right, wearing stephane; reverse ΦY/Γ−A, bull butting right, astragalos below; $45.00 (€39.15)


Philip II, July or August 247 - late 249 A.D., Deultum, Thrace

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Artemis is depicted here in the same pose as The Diana of Versailles, a slightly over life-size Roman marble statue from the 1st or 2nd century A.D., copying a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 B.C. The sculpture has a stag at her side. The sculpture may have come from a sanctuary at Nemi or possibly from Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli. In 1556, it was given by Pope Paul IV to Henry II of France, a subtle allusion to the king's mistress, Diane de Poitiers. It is now in the Musée du Louvre, Paris.
RP63228. Bronze AE 24, Draganov Deultum 1834 (O172/R280), Varbanov II 3090 (R4), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 6.632 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse M IVL PHILIPPVS CAESAR, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL FL P-A-C DEVLT, Artemis (Diana) advancing right, with right drawing bow from quiver on shoulder, bow in left; scarce; $45.00 (€39.15)


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.

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As required by the Treaty of Apamea, Demetrius, the son of Seleucus IV, was held in Rome as a hostage. After Antiochus IV (his uncle) died, he claimed the right to rule but Rome preferred Antiochus V, a weak child. Demetrius escaped, was welcomed in Syria and took his throne. Antiochus V and his regent were executed. Demetrius defeated Judas Maccabaeus and restored Seleukid control over Judaea.
GB58092. Bronze serrated AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 1645, SNG Spaer 1295 ff.; BMC Seleucid p. 80, 4; SGCV II 7027, F, weight 11.779 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse bust of Artemis right wearing stephane, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ∆HMHTPIOY, bow and quiver; $44.00 (€38.28)


Phygela, Ionia, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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Phygela was a small coastal town south-west of Ephesos.
GB59712. Bronze AE 11, SNGvA 2149; BMC Ionia p. 228, 1 ff. var. (no Γ); SNG Cop 1072 var (monogram vice astragalos); Lindgren -, F, weight 1.381 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 0o, Phygela mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Artemis Munychia right, wearing stephane; reverse ΦY/Γ−A, bull butting right, astragalos below; $40.00 (€34.80)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C.

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Philip's reign was principally marked by an unsuccessful struggle against the emerging power of Rome. Philip was attractive and charismatic as a young man. A dashing and courageous warrior, he was inevitably compared to Alexander the Great and was nicknamed the darling of all Greece. --
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


GB62603. Bronze AE 21, SNG Alpha Bank 1127, SNG München 1193, SNG Cop -, Fine, weight 4.258 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 45o, Macedonian mint, c. 183 - 182 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder; reverse eagle standing facing on thunderbolt, wings open, head right, Φ−I across upper field, ∆I monogram lower left; scarce; $40.00 (€34.80)


Perga, Pamphylia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.Ruins of the main street in Perga
GB67176. Bronze AE 18, SNG BnF 355 - 361, Klein 619, SNG Cop 310 (2nd - 1st c. B,C), SNGvA 4649, BMC Lycia 15, aF, corrosion, weight 3.920 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Perga mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse sphinx seated right, curved wings, kalathos on head; reverse Pamphylian inscription: NANAΨAΣ / ΠPEIIAΣ, Artemis standing left, wearing short chiton and hunting boots, wreath in right, scepter vertical behind in left; $40.00 (€34.80)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathocles, 317 - 289 B.C.

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With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GB67127. Bronze litra, Calciati II p. 277, 142; SNG ANS 708 ff.; SNG Cop 779; BMC Sicily p. 199; 422 ff.; SGCV I 1200; HGC 2 1537 (S), aF, weight 9.720 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 304 - 289 B.C.; obverse ΣΩTEIPA, draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΓAΘOKΛEOΣ, winged thunderbolt; $40.00 (€34.80)


Phygela, Ionia, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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Phygela was a small coastal town south-west of Ephesos.
GB57538. Bronze AE 11, SNGvA 2149; BMC Ionia p. 228, 1 ff. var. (no Γ); SNG Cop 1072 var (monogram vice astragalos); Lindgren -, aVF, weight 1.808 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Phygela mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Artemis Munychia right, wearing stephane; reverse ΦY/Γ−A, bull butting right, astragalos below; corrosion; $36.00 (€31.32)


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Perga, Pamphylia

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The monumental fountain or nymphaeum of Perga consists of a wide pool, and behind it a two-storeyed richly worked facade. From its inscription, it is apparent that the structure was dedicated to Artemis Pergaia, Septimius Severus, his wife Julia Domna, and their sons. An inscription belonging to the facade, various facade fragments, and marble statues of Septimius Severus and his wife, all found in excavations of the nymphaeum, are now in the Antalya Museum. Nymphaeum of Perge
RP69822. Bronze AE 27, Lindgren I 1137 (same rev die), cf. SNG Pfälzer 410 (AE18), BMC Lycia -, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Leypold -, aF, rough, varnished, weight 5.574 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Perga mint, obverse AY K Γ OYEI TPE ΓAΛΛON, laureate and draped bust right, globe below; reverse ΠEPΓAIΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing long chiton, arrow downward at side in right hand, bow in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; extremely rare; $35.00 (€30.45)




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Artemis or Diana