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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Medieval & Modern Coins ▸ IslamicView Options:  |  |  | 

Islamic Coins

Normans, Kingdom of Sicily, William II, 1166 - 1189 A.D.

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Secluded and pleasure-loving, William II, the Good, seldom emerged from his palace life at Palermo. Yet his reign was marked by an ambitious foreign policy and vigorous diplomacy. Champion of the papacy and in secret league with the Lombard cities he was able to defy the common enemy, Frederick I Barbarossa.
ME77194. Bronze follaro, MEC Italy III 432, VF, weight 2.208 g, maximum diameter 12.6 mm, die axis 0o, Messina mint, obverse facing lion head; reverse Arabic legend "al-malik / Ghulyalim / al-thani" (King William 2nd); $65.00 (€57.85)
 


The Coinage of the Ayyubids

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BW40234. The Coinage of the Ayyubids by Paul Balog, Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication Number 12, London, 1980, 334 pages, 50 plates, hardcover, dust jacket, new; $40.00 (€35.60)
 


Roman-Byzantine or Early Islamic, Bronze Disk Weight, c. 350 - 650 A.D.

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This is light for a nomisma weight and we would suspect it is a game piece but Weber insists all these types of bronze with concentric rings are weights. He suggests some may be early Islamic.
BZ90517. cf. Weber Byzantinische 127, VF, green patina, weight 3.570 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, obverse concentric circles (appear to cast); reverse plain; $40.00 (€35.60)
 


Islamic, Seljuqs Sultanate of Rum, Kaykhusraw I, 1192 - 1196, 1204-1210

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Kaykhusraw I, the eleventh and youngest son of Kilij Arslan II, succeeded his father in 1192. He ruled 1192-1196 and 1205-1211, but had to fight his brothers for control of the Sultanate. He married a granddaughter of the Byzantine emperor Manuel I Komnenos. In 1207 he seized Antalya from its Frankish garrison and furnished the Seljuq state with a port on the Mediterranean. According to Niketas Choniates, he was killed in single combat by Theodore I Laskaris, the emperor of Nicaea, during the Battle of Antioch on the Meander.Seljuqs of Rum
IS67182. Bronze fals, Album 1207, Mitchiner WOI -, F, weight 2.506 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 315o, 2nd reign, 600 - 607 AH, 1205 - 1211; obverse horseman riding right, sword in right, two stars above; reverse Arabic inscriptions, no mint or date, including title "Abul-Fat-h"; $36.00 (€32.04)
 


Amirs of Sindh, 'Abd Allah, c. 870 - 1030 A.D.

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Sindh is an ancient name for the Indus valley from the Arabian Sea to the Salt Range with Mansura in the south and Multan in the north. The name Pakistan is formed from an acronym, the S for Sindh. From early 8th century A.D., this area was ruled by governors appointed by the Umayyad and then the Abbasid Caliphs. In the 9th century A.D., two separate kingdoms ruled from Mansura and Multan. The rulers of Mansura are known as Amirs of Sindh or Habbarids. Very little is known about them apart from their coins. The dates and even the order of reigns are unknown. In 1030, Sindh was conquered by Mahmud of Ghazni.
IS75707. Silver Qandhari dirham, Mitchiner WOI 642 (fractional dirham), Album A1502 (C, AR damma, 'Abd Allah II), F, toned, well centered, tight flan with tiny edge splits, weight 0.528 g, maximum diameter 9.6 mm, die axis 180o, Mansura (near Shahdadpur, Pakistan) mint, undated; obverse Arabic inscription in three lines: There is no god but God alone; reverse Arabic inscription in three lines: Muhammad is the Messenger of God, the prince 'Abdullah; $32.00 (€28.48)
 


Amirs of Sindh, 'Abd Allah, c. 870 - 1030 A.D.

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Sindh is an ancient name for the Indus valley from the Arabian Sea to the Salt Range with Mansura in the south and Multan in the north. The name Pakistan is formed from an acronym, the S for Sindh. From early 8th century A.D., this area was ruled by governors appointed by the Umayyad and then the Abbasid Caliphs. In the 9th century A.D., two separate kingdoms ruled from Mansura and Multan. The rulers of Mansura are known as Amirs of Sindh or Habbarids. Very little is known about them apart from their coins. The dates and even the order of reigns are unknown. In 1030, Sindh was conquered by Mahmud of Ghazni.
IS75710. Silver Qandhari dirham, Mitchiner WOI 642, Album A1502 (C, AR damma, 'Abd Allah II), F, brockage, toned, weight 0.550 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, Mansura (near Shahdadpur, Pakistan) mint, undated; obverse Arabic inscription in three lines: There is no god but God alone; reverse incuse of obverse (the normal reverse is - Arabic inscription in three lines: Muhammad is the Messenger of God, the prince 'Abdullah); $24.00 (€21.36)
 


Amirs of Sindh, 'Abd Allah, c. 870 - 1030 A.D.

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Sindh is an ancient name for the Indus valley from the Arabian Sea to the Salt Range with Mansura in the south and Multan in the north. The name Pakistan is formed from an acronym, the S for Sindh. From early 8th century A.D., this area was ruled by governors appointed by the Umayyad and then the Abbasid Caliphs. In the 9th century A.D., two separate kingdoms ruled from Mansura and Multan. The rulers of Mansura are known as Amirs of Sindh or Habbarids. Very little is known about them apart from their coins. The dates and even the order of reigns are unknown. In 1030, Sindh was conquered by Mahmud of Ghazni.
IS75705. Silver Qandhari dirham, Mitchiner WOI 642, Album A1502 (C, AR damma, 'Abd Allah II), F, toned, reverse off center, tiny edge splits, weight 0.733 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 180o, Mansura (near Shahdadpur, Pakistan) mint, undated; obverse Arabic inscription in three lines: There is no god but God alone; reverse Arabic inscription in three lines: Muhammad is the Messenger of God, the prince 'Abdullah; $20.00 (€17.80)
 


Amirs of Sindh, 'Abd Allah, c. 870 - 1030 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Sindh is an ancient name for the Indus valley from the Arabian Sea to the Salt Range with Mansura in the south and Multan in the north. The name Pakistan is formed from an acronym, the S for Sindh. From early 8th century A.D., this area was ruled by governors appointed by the Umayyad and then the Abbasid Caliphs. In the 9th century A.D., two separate kingdoms ruled from Mansura and Multan. The rulers of Mansura are known as Amirs of Sindh or Habbarids. Very little is known about them apart from their coins. The dates and even the order of reigns are unknown. In 1030, Sindh was conquered by Mahmud of Ghazni.
IS75714. Silver Qandhari dirham, Mitchiner WOI 642, Album A1502 (C, AR damma, 'Abd Allah II), aF, toned, tiny edge splits, weight 0.439 g, maximum diameter 9.6 mm, die axis 225o, Mansura (near Shahdadpur, Pakistan) mint, undated; obverse Arabic inscription in three lines: There is no god but God alone; reverse Arabic inscription in three lines: Muhammad is the Messenger of God, the prince 'Abdullah; $20.00 (€17.80)
 


Islamic, Zangid Atabegs of Sinjar, Qutb al-Din Muhammad, 594 - 616 AD, 1197 - 1219 A.D.

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The obverse is imitative of a bronze of Caracalla struck at Edessa, Mesopotamia.
IS47246. Bronze dirhem, Spengler-Sayles 81, Album 1880.2, Mitchiner WOI 1139 - 1140, F, obv off-center, weight 9.677 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 45o, Sinjar mint, 596 - 600 AH, 1199 - 1204 A.D.; obverse Kufic inscription: mint name and date (date off flan), bare headed, curly-haired, draped a cuirassed Roman-style bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left shoulder; reverse cursive four line Kufic inscription: names and titles of the Abbasid Calif al-Nasir and Qutb al-Din Muhammad; Zengid tamga (stylized fulmen) below; $17.00 (€15.13)


Islamic, Ghaznavids, Khusrau Malik, AH 555 - 582, 1160 - 1186 A.D.

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Abu'l-Muzaffar Khusrau Malik ibn Khusrau-Shah, better known as Khusrau Malik (also spelled Khosrow Malik), was the last Sultan of the Ghaznavid Empire, ruling 1160 - 1186. In 1161/2, Oghuz Turks seized the Ghaznavid capital of Ghazna, forcing Khusrau Malik to make Lahore his new capital. From there he expanded his rule into northern India, as far as southern Kashmir. In 1178 the Ghurid ruler Mu'izz al-Din Muhammad invaded and by 1181/2 swept around Lahore. Khusrau Malik only managed to keep the city by paying him. Lahore was finally captured by the Ghurids in 1186. Khusrau-Malik and his son were taken to Ghur and imprisoned, marking the end of the Ghaznavid Empire.
IS75959. Bronze jital, Album 1664.2, Mitchiner WOI 802, Tye Jitals 120.3, Deyell 115, F, tight flan typical for the type, weight 3.316 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 225o, Lahore mint, undated, AH 555 - 582; obverse Arabic inscription in four lines: al-sultan / al-a'zam / Siraj / al-Dawla (the very great sultan, light of the state); border of pellets and outer linear circle; reverse Arabic inscription in two lines: Khusraw / Malik, crescent above, circle of dots between inner and outer linear borders; $16.00 (€14.24)
 


Islamic, Umayyad Caliphate, Damascus, c. 680s A.D., Arab-Byzantine Coinage

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Damascus is the capital of Syria and is now, due to civil war fighting in Aleppo, most likely the largest city of Syria. First settled in the second millennium B.C., Damascus was the capital of the Umayyad Caliphate from 661 to 750. After the victory of the Abbasid dynasty, the seat of Islamic power was moved to Baghdad. Damascus saw a political decline throughout the Abbasid era, only to regain significant importance in the Ayyubid and Mamluk periods. During Ottoman rule, the city decayed while maintaining a certain cultural prestige. Damascus today is a major cultural and religious center of the Levant.
BZ77975. Bronze fals, Walker BMC 7; SICA I 560; DOCAB 49; Album 3517.1 (S), Mitchiner WOI -, Fair, porous, weight 3.449 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Dimashq (Damascus) mint, c. 650 A.D.; obverse DAMACKOC, emperor standing facing, long cross scepter in left hand, globus cruciger in right hand, bird standing right atop T on left, ΛEO curving downward on right; reverse large M (40 nummi), rho-cross monogram above, arc over horizontal line below, ANO downward on left, X/Y/II (frozen pseudo regnal year 17) in three lines on right, ∆AM (Damascus) in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; scarce; $7.99 (€7.11)


Amirs of Sindh, 'Abd Allah, c. 870 - 1030 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Sindh is an ancient name for the Indus valley from the Arabian Sea to the Salt Range with Mansura in the south and Multan in the north. The name Pakistan is formed from an acronym, the S for Sindh. From early 8th century A.D., this area was ruled by governors appointed by the Umayyad and then the Abbasid Caliphs. In the 9th century A.D., two separate kingdoms ruled from Mansura and Multan. The rulers of Mansura are known as Amirs of Sindh or Habbarids. Very little is known about them apart from their coins. The dates and even the order of reigns are unknown. In 1030, Sindh was conquered by Mahmud of Ghazni.
IS75712. Silver Qandhari dirham, Mitchiner WOI 642, Album A1502 (C, AR damma, 'Abd Allah II), F, toned, tiny edge splits, weight 0.500 g, maximum diameter 9.9 mm, die axis 180o, Mansura (near Shahdadpur, Pakistan) mint, undated; obverse Arabic inscription in three lines: There is no god but God alone; reverse Arabic inscription in three lines: Muhammad is the Messenger of God, the prince 'Abdullah; $6.99 (€6.22)


Islamic, Umayyad Caliphate, Damascus, c. 680s A.D., Arab-Byzantine Coinage

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While the Muslims administered the city, the population of Damascus remained mostly Christian—Eastern Orthodox and Monophysite—with a growing community of Muslims from Mecca, Medina, and the Syrian Desert. The governor assigned to the city which had been chosen as the capital of Islamic Syria was Mu'awiya I. After the death of Caliph Ali in 661, Mu'awiya was chosen as the caliph of the expanding Islamic empire. Because of the vast amounts of assets his clan, the Umayyads, owned in the city and because of its traditional economic and social links with the Hijaz as well as the Christian Arab tribes of the region, Mu'awiya established Damascus as the capital of the entire Caliphate. With the ascension of Caliph Abd al-Malik in 685, an Islamic coinage system was introduced and all of the surplus revenue of the Caliphate's provinces were forwarded to the treasury of Damascus. Arabic was also established as the official language, giving the Muslim minority of the city an advantage over the Aramaic-speaking Christians in administrative affairs. It is critical to note that, at the time Damascus was conquered by the Muslims, the majority of Arabs were either pagans or Christians. Damascus itself was predominantly Aramaic with Arab speaking people.
BZ77973. Bronze fals, Walker BMC 7; SICA I 560; DOCAB 49; Album 3517.1 (S), Mitchiner WOI -, aF, rough, weight 3.450 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, Dimashq (Damascus) mint, c. 650 A.D.; obverse DAMACKOC, emperor standing facing, long cross scepter in left hand, globus cruciger in right hand, bird standing right atop T on left, ΛEO curving downward on right; reverse large M (40 nummi), rho-cross monogram above, arc over horizontal line below, ANO downward on left, X/Y/II (frozen pseudo regnal year 17) in three lines on right, ∆AM (Damascus) in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; scarce; $6.49 (€5.78)


Islamic, Bahriyya Mamluks, 1250 - 1382 A.D.

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The Bahriyya Mamluks or Bahri dynasty was a Mamluk dynasty of mostly Cuman-Kipchak Turkic origin that ruled the Egyptian Mamluk Sultanate from 1250 to 1382. They followed the Ayyubid dynasty and were succeeded by a second Mamluk dynasty, the Burji dynasty. Their name "Bahriyya" means 'of the river', referring to the location of their original settlement on Al-Rodah Island in the Nile (Nahr al-Nil) in Medieval Cairo at the castle of Al-Rodah which was built by the Ayyubid Sultan as-Salih Ayyub.
IS75702. Silver half dirham, VF, struck with full dirham dies on an irregular half dirham die, weight 1.285 g, maximum diameter 12.0 mm, die axis 135o, obverse fragment of an Arabic inscription:...al sultan al malik...(sultan's name not visible); reverse fragment of an Arabic inscription: part of the shahada (“there is no god but Allah, and Muhammad is the messenger of Allah”); $5.00 (€4.45)
 







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REFERENCES

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Balog, P. The Coinage of the Mamluk Sultans of Egypt and Syria. ANSNS 12. (New York, 1964).
Balog, P. The Coinage of the Ayyubids. RNSSP 12. (London, 1980).
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Sagdeeva R. Silver coins of khans of Golden Horde. (Moscow, 2005).
Spengler, W. & W. Sayles. Turkoman Figural Bronze Coins and Their Iconography. (Lodi, 1992).
Sultan, J. (Holberton, W.). Coins of the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish Republic: A Detailed Catalogue of the Jem Sultan Collection. (Thousand Oaks, CA, 1977).
Tye, R. & M. Jitals: a catalogue and account of the coin denomination of daily use in medieval Afghanistan and North West India. (Isle of South Uist, 1995).
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Zeno.ru - Oriental Coins Database: www.zeno.ru.

See Islamic in NumisWiki for a complete list of Islamic Coin references used by Forum Ancient Coins.


Catalog current as of Friday, May 26, 2017.
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Islamic Coins