Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Please login or register to use this function! FORVM Budget Auction Closes TONIGHT 28 August at 10 PM EDT Click the Auction button in the header to go to the Members' Auction All auctions started at $.99 and most estimates are under $100 Please login or register to use this function! FORVM Budget Auctions Close TONIGHT 28 August at 10 PM EDT Click the Auction button in the header to go to the Members' Auction All auctions started at $.99 and most estimates are under $100

Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Constantinian Era ▸ HanniballianusView Options:  |  |  | 

Hanniballianus, Rex Regum, 337 A.D.

In 335, Hannibalianus, Constantine the Great's nephew, married his cousin, Constantine's elder daughter, Constantina, and was made nobilissimus. Hannibalianus was named rex regum et Ponticarum gentium (King of the Pontic Land and Peoples) in early 337. It was Constantine's intention to put Hannibalianus on the Pontic throne, after the defeat of the Sassanid Persians. However, the Persian campaign did not take place, because Constantine died in May 337. Later in 337, Hannibalianus, Dalmatius and many other male relatives, were murdered at the behest of one or all of Constantine's sons (though they denied it). Hannibalianus was the Roman king who never actually ruled any territory.


Click for a larger photo
Hannibalianus, the nephew of Constantine I, was named rex regum et Ponticarum gentium (King of the Pontic Land and Peoples) in early 337. He was to take the place the pro-Roman King Tigranes of Armenia, who had recently been ousted by the Persian King Shapur II. Constantine, however, died on 22 May, before retaking Armenia. Later in 337, Hannibalianus, Dalmatius and many other male relatives, were murdered at the behest of one or all of Constantine’s sons (though they denied it). Hannibalianus was the Roman king who never actually ruled any territory.
RL83508. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Constantinople 147 (R2), LRBC I 1034, SRCV IV 16905, Cohen VII 2, F, well centered, reverse legend not fully struck, weight 1.302 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 336 - 337 A.D; obverse FL HANNIBALLIANO REGI, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SE-CVRITAS PVBLICA, Euphrates reclining right leaning on scepter, urn at his side, reed behind, CONSS in exergue; rare; $260.00 (€231.40)
 


Click for a larger photo
Hannibalianus, the nephew of Constantine I, was named rex regum et Ponticarum gentium (King of the Pontic Land and Peoples) in early 337. He was to take the place the pro-Roman King Tigranes of Armenia, who had recently been ousted by the Persian King Shapur II. Constantine, however, died on 22 May, before retaking Armenia. Later in 337, Hannibalianus, Dalmatius and many other male relatives, were murdered at the behest of one or all of Constantine's sons (though they denied it). Hannibalianus was the Roman king who never actually ruled any territory.
SH04892. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Constantinople 147 (R2), LRBC I 1034, SRCV IV 16905, Cohen VII 2, Choice gVF+, weight 1.76 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 336 - 337 A.D; obverse FL HANNIBALLIANO REGI, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS PVBLICA, Euphrates reclining right leaning on scepter, urn at his side, reed behind, CONSS in exergue; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
This coin is extremely rare because of the legend break on the reverse. Almost all examples break after SE or SEC. This example breaks between the V and the R in SECVRITAS. This variant is likely limited to a single reverse die.
SH32720. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Constantinople 148 (R5) var. (rev. legend break), LRBC I 1036 var. (same), SRCV IV 16905, Cohen VII 2, VF, nice patina, weight 1.397 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 336 - 337 A.D; obverse FL HANNIBALLIANO REGI, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECV-RITAS PVBLICA, Euphrates reclining right leaning on scepter, urn at his side, reed behind, CONSS in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD










OBVERSE LEGENDS

FLANNIBALIANOREGI
FLHANNIBALLIANOREGI


REFERENCES

Bruun, P.M. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. VII, Constantine and Licinius A.D. 313 - 337. (London, 1966).
Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Failmezger, V. Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity, 294 - 364 A.D. (Washington D.C., 2002).
King, C.E. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Milchev, S. The Coins of Constantine the Great. (Sophia, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Voetter, O. Die Münzen der romischen Kaiser, Kaiserinnen und Caesaren von Diocletianus bis Romulus: Katalog der Sammlung Paul Gerin. (Vienna, 1921).

Catalog current as of Monday, August 29, 2016.
Page created in 0.499 seconds
Roman Coins of Hanniballianus