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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Big BronzeView Options:  |  |  |   

Big Bronze

Large bronze provided the finest canvas for ancient master celators to illustrate their artistry. Superb sestertius and medallions often obtain higher prices than even rare gold coins.


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

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Faustina II was daughter, wife and mother of emperors and empresses. When she gave birth to the first of many children she was given the title of Augusta, which for a time made her superior in rank to her husband. She was a devoted wife and mother, and accompanied her husband on all his military campaigns.
SH77013. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1697 var. (throne without canopy, and S C across field), BMCRE 1568 var. (same), MIR 18 54-6a, Banti 7, VF, dark green patina with touches of red, weight 23.644 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 30o, Rome mint, struck under Marcus Aurelius, c. 175 - 176 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right; reverse AETERNITAS, Faustina seated left on throne with canopy, holding scepter, between two female attendants (carrying her throne?) with veils flying above their heads, S C in exergue; ex Triton XIX, lot 578; ex A.K. Collection; ex Kress 164 (Nov 1975), lot 1141; very rare variety; $2500.00 (€2200.00)
 


Pupienus, 22 April - 29 July 238 A.D.

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The reverse refers to the harmony and friendship of the emperors Balbinus and Pupienus. Because they were quarreling they were unable to put up a joint defense against the praetorians. They were both murdered after a reign of only 99 days.
SH76157. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV, part 2, 20; Cohen V 7 (12 fr.); BMCRE VI 43; SRCV III 8530; Hunter III 12, aVF, superb portrait, well centered, toned brass with touches of green, areas of light corrosion, weight 20.257 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, later issue; obverse IMP CAES M CLOD PVPIENVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG, Concordia seated left, patera in extended right hand, double cornucopia in left, S C in exergue; $1250.00 (€1100.00)
 


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian

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Pudicitia, modesty and chastity, was for Romans the highest regarded female virtue. For an unmarried girl, pudicitia meant virginity. For a wife, it meant faithfulness and devotion to her husband. Romans loved the story of Arria, an ultimate example of Roman pudicitia. When the emperor Claudius ordered her husband Paetus to end his own life, he hesitated. Arria took his dagger and stabbed herself to set an example, saying, "Paetus, it doesn't hurt."
SH73695. Bronze sestertius, RIC II Hadrian 1032(c) (S), Hunter II 32, Cohen II 61, BMCRE III Hadrian 1877 var. (diadem vice wreath), SRCV II 3937, aVF, excellent portrait, well centered, green patina, marks and scratches, some corrosion, weight 23.691 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 135 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, draped bust right, wearing wreath of grain, hair in long plait falling down back of neck and roll above wreath in front; reverse PVDICITIA, Pudicitia seated left on high-backed throne, veiled and draped, feet on footstool, right hand on breast (raising to lips), left hand in lap, S C in exergue; old anonymous dealer or collector tag in Italian; scarce; $750.00 (€660.00)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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In 132, a messianic, charismatic Jewish leader Simon bar Kokhba started the Bar Kokhba revolt, a war of liberation for Judea against Rome. At first the rebellion was a success. The legion X Fretensis was forced to retreat from Jerusalem to Caesarea. The legion XXII Deiotariana, which advanced from Egypt, was destroyed. The Jews re-established their sacrifices and struck coins to celebrate their independence. The rebellion would last for only 30 months. By 135, the Romans had recaptured Jerusalem, Simon bar Kokhba was dead, and the majority of the Jewish population of Judea was either killed, exiled, or sold into slavery. Jerusalem was renamed Colonia Aelia Capitolina and an altar to Jupiter was erected on the site of the Temple. The Jews remained scattered without a homeland for close to two millennia.

SH73703. Copper as, BMCRE III 1459, RIC II 719(d), Cohen II 659, Hunter 478 var. (draped), SRCV II -, Choice gVF, well centered, excellent portrait, green patina, areas of porosity, weight 10.412 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 132 - 135 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse FELICITATI AVG, war galley rowed left over waves, mast with furled sail on prow, five oarsmen, steersman under an arched shelter and apluster at stern, S - C flanking ship, COS III P P in exergue; ex Tom Cederlind; $700.00 (€616.00)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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In summer 130 A.D., Hadrian traveled from Syria, into Judaea and Palestine, and then on to Egypt. The bar-Kochba revolt in Judaea forced Hadrian to remain in the region until 135. In 136 A.D., Hadrian returned to Rome, ending his long travels.
SH72906. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 894 (R); Hendin 1604d, Cohen II 52, SRCV II 3566 var, Fair, weight 24.916 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 136 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ADVENTVI AVG IVDAEAE, Hadrian on left, standing right, togate, raising right hand, facing Judaea who holds a patera over altar in right and cup in left, two small children each holding a palm frond flank the altar, S C in exergue; rare; $640.00 (€563.20)
 


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

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In Roman religion, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. The cult of Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was of special importance to the imperial household. She is usually depicted wearing a long cloak and holding a patera (sacrificial bowl), a cornucopia (symbol of prosperity), or a caduceus (symbol of peace).
RB26685. Orichalcum sestertius, SRCV II 4710, RIC III 1368, BMCRE IV 2198, VF, weight 19.689 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 157 - 161 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTI PII FIL S C, Concordia standing left, patera in extended right, cornucopia in left; $600.00 (€528.00)
 


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

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Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
SH73705. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III AP1388b; BMCRE IV AP2147; Hunter II p. 300, 30; Cohen II 268; SRCV II 4720, VF, nice style, well centered, flan crack, weight 24.039 g, maximum diameter 35.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 148 - 152 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right with head bare, hair waived and coiled chignon tied with double band of pearls on back of head; reverse VENVS, Venus standing half left, apple in right hand, grounded rudder in left hand, dolphin coiled around rudder, S - C low across field; $600.00 (€528.00)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Restitution Issue Struck in Thrace under Titus

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The restoration coins of Titus and Domitian attributed by BMC to Lugdunum have been reattributed in RPC II and the new RIC II, part 1 to Thrace, and perhaps Perinthus. The types are rarely found in the west and are most frequently found in the Balkans, some share a countermark identical to some coins of Perinthus, the epigraphy does not fit Lugdunum or Rome, and the inconsistent die axis is characteristic of the Perinthus mint.
SH73458. Brass sestertius, RPC II 511, RIC II, part 1, Titus 403 (R); BMCRE II Titus 263; BnF III -; Hunter I -; Cohen I -; SRCV I -, gF, centered, nice green patina, weight 24.742 g, maximum diameter 35.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thrace, Perinthus(?) mint, 80 A.D.; obverse DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, Augustus seated left on curule chair, feet on footstool, radiate and togate, patera in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; reverse IMP T CAES DIVI DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P COS VIII (clockwise starting at 12:00), large S C, REST above; huge 35 mm bronze!; rare; $540.00 (€475.20)
 


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

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This counterclockwise legend variety is apparently very rare, with none on Coin Archives, and we couldn't find a single example online. Cohen and BMCRE do not identify the legend direction and the types are not included on the plates. Their examples are more likely the more common clockwise varieties. The RIC coin is from different dies.
RB71567. Orichalcum sestertius, cf. RIC II, part 1, 134 (R2); Cohen I 139; BMCRE I p. 258, 174; Hunter I C3863 var. (AVGVSTI); BnF III 163 var. (obv. leg. clockwise), F, corrosion, pitting, weight 24.279 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, early 80 A.D.; obverse IMP T CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII (counterclockwise from lower right), laureate head right; reverse PAX AVGVST (clockwise from upper left), Pax standing left, branch in right hand, cornucopia in left, S - C flanking across field; very rare; $500.00 (€440.00)
 


Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Soli-Pompeiopolis, Cilicia

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Aratos was a native of Soli. His chief pursuits were medicine, grammar, and philosophy. He studied with Menecrates in Ephesus, Philitas in Cos and Praxiphanes in Athens. About 276 he was invited to the court of the Antigonus II Gonatas, whose victory over the Gauls in 277 BC Aratus set to verse. There he wrote his most famous poem, Phaenomena ("Appearances"). He then spent some time at the court of Antiochus I Soter but returned to Pella where he died sometime before 240 B.C.
SH58900. Bronze hexassarion, Lindgren I 1605 (same dies); Milne NC 1940, p. 247, 20; BMC Lycaonia -; SNG BnF -; SNG Levante -; SNGvA -; SNG Cop -; SNG Pfälzer -, gF, weight 12.323 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 180o, Soli-Pompeiopolis mint, 245 - 246 A.D.; obverse AYT K IOY ΦIΛIΠΠOC EY CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, Π − Π across field; reverse ΠOMΠHIOΠOΛ IAT (year 311) ς (6 assaria), bare-headed, draped bust of Aratos right; ex Ancient Numismatic Enterprise, comes with an old round coin ticket probably from Seaby 1960's or 1970's; extremely rare; $450.00 (€396.00)
 


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RB72831. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II, part 1, 702; BMCRE II 439, BnF III 476; Hunter I 176; Cohen I 314; cf. SRCV I 2766 (COS XIIII), attractive F, excellent portrait, nice chocolate tone, uneven strike with some legend unstruck and top of reverse weak, light corrosion, weight 25.472 g, maximum diameter 34.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 90 - 91 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P, laureate head right; reverse IOVI VICTORI, Jupiter seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, Victory standing left raising wreath in his extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in his left hand, S C in exergue; $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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A skilled general and administrator, Postumus rebelled against Gallienus, uniting Gaul, Spain and Britain into a Gallic-Roman empire. Successful against the Germans, he kept his empire secure and prosperous. He was assassinated by his own troops after he refused to allow them to sack Moguntiacum (Mainz).
SH66364. Bronze double sestertius, Bastien Postume 87, RIC V 143 (Lugdunum), Cohen VI 177, VF, weight 13.981 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis or Treveri mint, 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse LAETITIA AVG (AVG in exergue), galley left, four rowers and steersman; $330.00 (€290.40)
 


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A2, Basil II & Constantine VIII, 976 - 1025 A.D.

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This type is identified in Wayne Sayles' "Ancient Coin Collecting V" as one of the masterpieces of Romaion coinage.
SH76367. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A2; SBCV 1813; Grierson ornaments 18, Choice VF, large flan, nice green patina, well centered, small areas of weak strike on edge, weight 14.472 g, maximum diameter 35.1 mm, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 10 Jan 976 - 15 Dec 1025 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHL, facing bust of Christ, wears nimbus cruciger ornamented in each limb of cross, pallium and colobium, Gospels in both hands, to left IC, to right XC; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornamentation above and below legend; $320.00 (€281.60)
 


Obulco, Hispania Ulterior, Early 2nd Century B.C.

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Iberian is read from right to left. Some Iberian letters combine a consonant and a vowel, as indicated in our description with the use of upper and lower case letters.
CE71005. Copper AE 35, Villaronga-Benages 2185 (R3), Alvarez-Burgos 1779, SNG BM 1405, SNG Lorichs 435 ff., Villaronga 342.8, Choice F, earthen highlighting, weight 31.084 g, maximum diameter 35.4 mm, die axis 45o, Obulco mint, Early 2nd century B.C.; obverse OBVLCO, female head right, hair in a bun behind; reverse plough over stalk of grain left above Iberian inscription: SIBiBoLAI / URKAIL (magistrates' names) in two lines, horizontal line above and below each name; big 35.4 mm 31 gram bronze!; scarce; $310.00 (€272.80)
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon, 3rd Democracy, 344 - 336 B.C.

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Timoleon installed a democracy in 345 B.C. After the long series of internal struggles had weakened Syracuse's power, Timoleon tried to remedy this, defeating the Carthaginians near the Krimisos river in 339 B.C. Unfortunately the struggle among the city's parties restarted after his death and ended with the rise of another tyrant, Agathocles, who seized power in 317 B.C.
SH71353. Bronze dilitron, Calciati II p. 185, 80; SNG ANS 533; SNG Morcom 717; SNG München 1159; SNG Lloyd 1456; BMC Sicily p. 189, 311; HGC 2 1439 (S), gVF, some corrosion, weight 18.018 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 225o, Syracuse mint, 344 - 336 B.C.; obverse ZEYΣ EΛEYΘEPIOΣ, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios left; reverse ΣYPAKOΣION, free horse prancing left; $310.00 (€272.80)
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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Huge bronze! The largest of all Ptolemaic bronze coins.
GP75643. Bronze octobol, Svoronos 446; Weiser 19; BMC Ptolemies p. 37, 158; SNG Cop 142; Noeske 64; Hosking 13; Malter 67, aF, weight 77.706 g, maximum diameter 46.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head turned back right, E between legs; $300.00 (€264.00)
 


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Construction of the Colosseum, started by Vespasian c. 72 A.D., was completed by Titus in 80 A.D. It was capable of seating 50,000 spectators. Games held for its inauguration lasted for 100 days and nights, during which some 5,000 animals were slaughtered.
RB77111. Brass sestertius, cf. RIC II, part 1, 837 (R2); RPC II 530; Cahn Bithynia 24; BnF III 551, BMCRE II 516 (Lyon); Cayon I 52; Cohen I 345; Hunter I -, aVF/F, well centered, a little rough, weight 24.753 g, maximum diameter 37.9 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Thracian mint, 82 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITIAN CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII, laureate head right; reverse PAX AVGVST, Pax standing left, branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking across field; rare; $290.00 (€255.20)
 


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

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Possibly a provincial mint issue.
BZ77225. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson ornaments 32, aVF, nice patina, strike a weak and uneven, reverse a little off center, weight 8.937 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 180o, provincial(?) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHL, facing nimbate bust of Christ, pallium and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, to left IC, to right XC; nimbus and Gospels ornamented with crosses; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings), cross above and below legend; $275.00 (€242.00)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

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The site of Pautalia (modern Kyustendil, Bulgaria) was settled in the Iron Age by the Thracian Dentheletes tribe. It was located near thermal springs and remains of the ancient city include a temple of Asklepios and Roman baths. In the 1990s, excavation of nearby 2nd century A.D. tumuli unearthed bronze surgical instruments and a small bronze case containing a variety of medicines.
RP63965. Bronze AE 30, Ruzicka 264 (same reverse die), Varbanov II 4653, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, aF, smoothing, weight 26.306 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 180o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AYT K Λ CEΠTI CEYHPOC ΠEP CEB, laureate head right.; reverse HΓE K AIΛIOY ONEPATOY OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, tetrastyle temple seen in three-quarters perspective, no steps, Apollo-Bonus Eventus standing within, flanked by a tree left and another right; thick sestertius-like flan; rare; $270.00 (€237.60)
 


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Anchialus, Thrace

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When the Odrysian kingdom was abolished in 45 A.D., Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria today) became part of the Roman province of Thrace. It was formally proclaimed a city under Trajan. Anchialos thrived in the 2nd and 3rd centuries serving as the most important import and export station of Thrace and acquired the appearance of a Roman city under the Severan Dynasty.
RP68711. Bronze 4 assaria, Varbanov 464 (R5), AMNG II 555, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, Lindgren -, aVF, glossy green patina, weight 14.534 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 45o, Anchialus (Pomorie, Bulgaria) mint, 209 - 212 A.D.; obverse AY K Π CEΠ ΓETAC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse OYΛΠIANΩN AΓ−X−IAΛEΩN, Demeter standing left, reaching with right toward serpent coiled around large torch before her, small torch cradled in her left, two small pellets over ∆ in center field; rare; $270.00 (€237.60)
 


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

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Possibly a provincial mint issue.
BZ77223. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson ornaments 32, gF, nice dark blue-green patina, well centered, strike a little soft, small encrustations, weight 9.569 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 180o, provincial(?) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHL, facing nimbate bust of Christ, pallium and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, to left IC, to right XC; nimbus and Gospels ornamented with crosses; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings), cross above and below legend; $265.00 (€233.20)
 


Agrippa, Military Commander, Friend of Augustus, Grandfather of Caligula, Great-grandfather of Nero

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First commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus, the Pantheon was a temple dedicated to all the gods of ancient Rome. Hadrian rebuilt it in 126 A.D. The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 meters (142 ft. It is one of the best-preserved of all Roman buildings. It has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a Roman Catholic church dedicated to "St. Mary and the Martyrs" but informally known as "Santa Maria Rotonda." The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda.Pantheon on Wikipedia
RB76329. Copper as, RIC I Gaius 58; BMCRE II Tiberius 161 - 168; Cohen I 3, BnF II Caligula 77 - 97, SRCV I 1812, aVF, green patina, contact marks, corrosion, slightly rough, weight 11.287 g, maximum diameter 30.4 mm, die axis 190o, Rome mint, struck under his grandson Caligula, 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown; reverse Neptune standing half left, nude but for cloak over shoulders, dolphin in right hand, trident in left hand, S - C flanking across field; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

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For Roman wives, piety often meant accepting neglect. It was not considered adultery for a Roman husband to have sex with slaves or unmarried women. The historian Spartianus wrote that after Lucilla complained, Lucius Verus reproached her: "Uxor enim dignitatis nomen est, non voluptatis" (Wife is the name of dignity, not bliss).
SH77014. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1756, BMCRE IV 1161, Cohen III 54, Hunter II 27, SRCV II 5505, aVF, superb portrait, well centered, porous, weight 23.017 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right; reverse PIETAS, Pietas standing left, veiled, raising her right hand, perfume-box in left, flaming altar at feet on left, S - C flanking across field; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon, 344 - 336 B.C.

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Threatened by Carthage and dominated by Hiketas, the tyrant of Leontini, Syracusans sent an appeal for help to their mother city, Corinth. By a unanimous vote Corinth selected Timoleon to set sail for Sicily with a few leading citizens of Corinth and a small troop of Greek mercenaries. After defeating Hiketas, Timoleon put order to Syracuse' affairs and established a democratic government. He repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island. Timoleon then retired without any title or office, though he remained practically supreme. He became blind before his death, but when important issues were under discussion he was carried to the assembly to give his opinion, which was usually accepted. When he died the citizens of Syracuse erected a monument to his memory, afterward surrounded with porticoes, and a gymnasium called Timoleonteum.
GI76973. Bronze hemidrachm, Calciati II p. 168, 72 st 3; SNG ANS 477 ff.; SNG Cop 727, VF, nice style, nice patina, reverse off center but not detracting, small spots of corrosion on edge, weight 15.716 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, c. 342 - 338 B.C.; obverse ZEYΣEA EYΘEPTOΣ, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios right; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, thunderbolt, eagle on right standing right with wings closed; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

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The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
BZ76991. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson ornaments 24b, VF, nice portrait of Christ, well centered on a broad flan, attractive green patina, slightly uneven strike, weight 11.328 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHL, facing nimbate bust of Christ, two pellets in each arm of the cross, pallium and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, to left IC, to right XC; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornaments above and below legend; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


Otacilia Severa, Augusta February or March 244 - September or October 249 A.D.

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Pudicitia was the personification of modesty and chastity.
RB30704. Orichalcum sestertius, SRCV III 9169, RIC IV 209a, Cohen V 55, Hunter III - (p. cxi), VF, weight 16.513 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG, diademed draped bust right; reverse PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia seated left, drawing veil from face with right hand, long transverse scepter in left, S C in exergue; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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This reverse type was apparently only struck for Antoninus Pius in his year two. Milne lists only a single example. Emmett lists it as rarity 5 (only one or two specimens known from the collections he examined).
RX57412. Bronze hemidrachm, Milne 1612, Emmett 1716 (R5), Dattari -, Geissen -, BMC Alexandria -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, Kampmann-Ganschow -, aF, weight 11.475 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 138 - 28 Aug 139 A.D.; obverse AY TK T AIΛ A∆P ANTWNINOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Demeter seated left, veiled, sacrificing from patera in right over altar at feet left, long torch in left, LB (year 2) upper left; extremely rare; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon, 3rd Democracy, 344 - 336 B.C.

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Timoleon installed a democracy in 345 B.C. After the long series of internal struggles had weakened Syracuse's power, Timoleon tried to remedy this, defeating the Carthaginians near the Krimisos river in 339 B.C. Unfortunately the struggle among the city's parties restarted after his death and ended with the rise of another tyrant, Agathocles, who seized power in 317 B.C.
SH58244. Bronze dilitron, Calciati II p. 185, 80; SNG ANS 533 ff.; SNG Morcom 717; SNG München 1159; SNG Lloyd 1456; BMC Sicily p. 189, 311; HGC 2 1439 (S), VF, nice green patina, weight 18.748 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 344 - 336 B.C.; obverse ZEYΣ EΛEYΘEPIOΣ, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios left; reverse ΣYPAKOΣION, free horse prancing left; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

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Faustina I was the wife of Antoninus Pius. Little is known of her, except that she was regarded as vain and frivolous, though this may have just been malicious gossip. Antoninus Pius loved her greatly, and upon her death in 141 A.D. she was deified and a temple was built in her honor.
SH65151. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1118, BMCRE IV 1514, Cohen 88, SRCV II 4614, Nice VF, green patina, small patina edge chip on rev, weight 27.399 g, maximum diameter 32.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, pearls in hair and hair in elaborate bun on top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing facing, veiled head left, torch raised in right hand, stalks of grain downward in left, S - C flanking across field; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
SH66879. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 708, BMCRE VI 389, Cohen IV 83, SRCV II 8236, VF, weight 24.538 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA S C, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The Lighthouse of Alexandria, also called the Pharos, built by the Ptolemaic Kingdom between 280 and 247 B.C., was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Between 393 and 450 feet (120 - 140 m) tall, it was one of the tallest man-made structures on Earth for many centuries. Damaged by three earthquakes between 956 and 1323, it then became an abandoned ruin. It was the third longest surviving ancient wonder (after the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus and the still extant Great Pyramid of Giza), until in 1480 the last of its remnant stones were used to build the Citadel of Qaitbay on the site. In 1994, French archaeologists discovered some remains of the lighthouse on the floor of Alexandria's Eastern Harbor.
RX75135. Bronze drachm, Dattari 1768; Geissen 1121; Milne 1416; Kampmann 32.588; SNG Cop 386; BMC Alexandria p. 89, 757; Emmett 1002, aF, centered, weight 22.074 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 345o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 133 - 28 Aug 134 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse Isis Pharia right holding a billowing sail with both hands and left foot, sailing toward the Lighthouse of Pharos, which is surmounted by a statue and two Tritons, each blowing a buccinum (sea shell trumpet), L IH (year 18) above center; big 32 mm bronze; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

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Ptolemy III Euergetes was the third ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt. He promoted the translation of Jewish scriptures into Greek as the Septuagint. Due to a falling out at the Seleucid court, his eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus was murdered along with her infant son. In response he invaded Syria, occupied Antioch and even reached Babylon. This war, the Third Syrian War, is cryptically alluded to in Daniel XI 7-9.
GP75645. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 974, SNG Cop 224 - 226 (Ptolemy IV), Weiser 91 (Ptolemy IV), Noeske 155 (Ptolemy IV), Hosking 45 (Ptolemy IV), SNG Milan 246 (Ptolemy IV), VF, weight 42.461 g, maximum diameter 37.4 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 246 - 230 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing half left on fulmen, wings closed, head right, filleted cornucopia ascending behind from shoulder, E between legs; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Lot of 10 Worn Roman Imperial Sestertii

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1) Claudius, legend in wreath, NCAPR countermark.
2) Claudius, Imitative, Spes.
3) Nero, Roma seated.
4) Julia Titi.
5) Divus Marcus Aurelius, Eagle.
6) Commodus, 3 Monetae.
7) Septimius Severus, RIC 719, horseback.
8) Septimius Severus, RIC 706, Fortuna standing.
9) Philip II as Augustus, RIC 267a, emperors on chairs.
10) Volusian, RIC 251, Pax.
LT64559. Orichalcum Lot, Lot of 10 sestertii, Fair to Fine, $190.00 (€167.20)
 


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

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In May 540, the Byzantine general Belisarius conquered Mediolanum and the Gothic capital Ravenna. The Gothic king Vitiges and his wife Matasuntha were taken as captives to Constantinople. Vitiges later died there, without any children. After his death, Matasuntha married the patrician Germanus Justinus, a nephew of Justinian I by his sister Vigilantia.
SH71737. Bronze follis, DOC I 40b, Morrisson BnF 4/Cp/AE/60, Wroth BMC 58, Tolstoi 107, Ratto 507, Hahn MIBE 95a, SBCV 163, Sommer 4.20, Choice gVF, full circles strike on a huge flan, nice green patina, weight 23.632 g, maximum diameter 39.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 541 - 542 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVI, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, globus cruciger in right, shield on left ornamented with horseman, cross right; reverse large M (40 nummi), cross above, ANNO left, XY (regnal year 15) right, B (officina 2) below, CON (Constantinople) in exergue; $190.00 (€167.20)
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Dionysos I, 395 - 367 B.C.

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Dionysius I was tyrant of Syracuse. He conquered several cities in Sicily and southern Italy, opposed Carthage's influence in Sicily and made Syracuse the most powerful of the Western Greek colonies. He was regarded by the ancients as an example of the worst kind of despot - cruel, suspicious and vindictive.
GI76970. Bronze drachm, Calciati II p. 111, 62; SNG ANS 454; SNG Cop 720; SNG München 1135; SNG Morcom 697; BMC Sicily p. 187, 287; SGCV I 1189, F, some corrosion, weight 33.129 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, 395 - 367 B.C.; obverse ΣYPA, head of Athena left wearing olive wreathed Corinthian helmet; reverse sea star between two dolphins; big heavy bronze; $190.00 (€167.20)
 


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 200 - 27 B.C.

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Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GB72168. Bronze AE 28, SNGvA 7355 (with same countermark); SNG BnF 505 (also with same c/m); SNG Cop 84; BMC Mysia p. 40, 167, VF, nice style, well centered, nice green patina, bevelled obv edge, weight 12.530 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 90o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 27 B.C.; obverse head of Kore Soteira right, wearing grain wreath; countermark: eagle standing right, wings open in a 7.5mm round punch; reverse tripod with three loop handles, KYZI/KHNWN from upper right, in two flanking downward lines, branch right above, torch left below, monogram outer right, monogram outer left; $185.00 (€162.80)
 


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

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Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
SL73983. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III M1728; BMCRE IV p. 575, 1194; Cohen III 2; Hunter II 47; MIR Szaivert 24; SRCV II 5496, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (3761245-013), weight 26.30 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 2nd issue, c. 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waved and fastened in a chignon; reverse CERES, Ceres seated left on a basket (cista mystica) from which a snake is emerging, two stalks of grain in right hand, torch in left, S - C flanking across field; ex Johnathan K. Kern; $185.00 (€162.80)
 


Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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This type has been attributed to "Mint II," which is believed to be Cologne, but it is quite crude and could also be imitative. See RIC V, Part II, p. 349, note 1, for comments on imitative of this and similar types.
RB90466. Bronze double sestertius, cf. CNG auction 109, lot 243 (same reverse die); Bastien Postume 313; Méricourt-l'Abbé Hoard in TM XIII (1992) 95, VF, struck with damaged reverse die, corrosion, weight 9.446 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 90o, Mint II Cologne (or imitative) mint, c. 266 - spring 269 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse galley right, five oarsmen, AMV above, retrograde P left, Q(?) right, waves over palm frond left below; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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In 142, Antoninus Pius ordered the construction of the Antonine Wall. When complete the wall ran 39 miles (63 km) from Old Kilpatrick in West Dunbartonshire on the Firth of Clyde to Carriden near Bo'ness on the Firth of Forth (Scotland). The Romans built nineteen forts and smaller fortlets (milecastles), to protect the border against the Caledonians.
RB90470. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV 1315, Cohen II 819, RIC III 642(a), Strack III 863, SRCV II 4237, aF, weight 22.720 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 141 - 143 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG - PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right; reverse TIBERIS, Tiber reclining left, wreathed with reeds, resting right hand on boat on his far side, reeds in left, left arm resting on urn on its side from which water flows, S C in exergue; rare; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.

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Svoronos 1149 is the same as Svoronos 1148 but with the addition of the countermark.

Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria.
GP72049. Bronze tetrobol, Hosking 42 (with c/m); Svoronos 1149 (same); SNG Cop 211 (same); BMC Ptolemies p. 75, 76 (same, Ptolemy V); Noeske 151 (no c/m); Weiser 97 (Pt. V), VF, weight 39.031 g, maximum diameter 38.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, head turned back right, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs, rectangular cornucopia countermark; big 38 mm bronze; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Mark Antony and Octavian, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates, MAPKOΣ ANTΩNIONΣ AYTOKPATΩP ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAP AYTOKPATΩP. The bust of Libertas on the obverse "refers to the grant of freedom by the Triumvirs to Thessalonica in 42 BC after the battle of Philippi (the victory which is celebrated on the reverse)." -- RPC I, p. 29
SH72307. Leaded bronze AE 31, BMC Macedonia p. 115, 63; RPC I 1551/20-26; Sear CRI 672; SNG Cop 374; SNG ANS 823, aVF, weight 17.561 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 37 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONKEΩN EΛEYΘEPIAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Eleutheria (Liberty) right, E (year 5) below chin; reverse M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT, Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right, palm frond in left; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Mark Antony and Octavian, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates, MAPKOΣ ANTΩNIONΣ AYTOKPATΩP ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAP AYTOKPATΩP. The bust of Libertas on the obverse "refers to the grant of freedom by the Triumvirs to Thessalonica in 42 BC after the battle of Philippi (the victory which is celebrated on the reverse)." -- RPC I, p. 29
SH63716. Leaded bronze AE 31, BMC Macedonia p. 115, 63; RPC I 1551; Sear CRI 672; SNG Cop 374; SNG ANS 823, F, weight 18.710 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 37 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONKEΩN EΛEYΘEPIAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Eleutheria (Liberty) right, E (year 5) below chin; reverse M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT, Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right, palm frond in left; $175.00 (€154.00)
 


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

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Sear identifies this denomination for Aurelian as either an as or a reduced sestertius. The as (or reduced sestertius) is a very scarce denomination this late in the empire.
RA76203. Bronze as, MER-RIC 1871, Göbl MIR 145d0(1), BnF XII 297, Hunter IV 33, SRCV III 11646, RIC V 80 var. (officina number), Hunter IV 27 var. (4th officina), VF, well centered, nice green patina, flan crack, weight 6.041 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina(?), Rome mint, issue 11, early - September 275; obverse IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA AVG, Emperor and empress clasping hands, above and between them a radiate and draped bust of Sol right; $175.00 (€154.00)
 


Byzantine Empire, Focas, 23 November 602 - 5 October 610 A.D.

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In 608, A.D., Heraclius the Elder, exarch of Africa, and his son (also named Heraclius) revolted against Phocas, whose regime in Constantinople had become unpopular and violent. Syria and Palaestina Prima joined the revolt. On 4 October 610, Heraclius arrived at Constantinople with his fleet. Phocas was killed by a mob on the following day.
BZ67758. Bronze follis, DOC II part 1, 73a; Wroth BMC 90; Tolstoi 77; Ratto 1237; Morrisson BnF 6, Hahn MIB 76, SBCV 665, VF, weight 10.550 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 607 - 608 A.D.; obverse D N FOCA PERP AVΓ, bust facing, wearing crown with pendilia and consular robes, mappa in right, cross in left, small cross in left field; reverse XXXX (40 nummi), ANNO above, G (year 6) right, KYZA (Cyzicus, 1st officina) in exergue; $170.00 (€149.60)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RB90829. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 171a, Cohen V 51, gVF, Tiber patina, superb portrait, grainy, edge cracks, tight flan, edge clip at 12:00 (pre-strike to adjust flan weight?), weight 13.589 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FIDES EXERCITVS, four legionary standards, second from left signum militaria with hand on top, third an aquila, S C in exergue; $165.00 (€145.20)
 


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
RB73707. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II Hadrian 1028, Cohen II 38, BMCRE III Hadrian 1869, SRCV II 3934, Hunter II -, gF, spots of patina flaking, small areas of corrosion, cleaning scratches, weight 24.517 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 132 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA HADRAINI AVG P P, diademed and draped bust right; reverse IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left, patera extended in right, scepter in left, S - C flanking across field below center; ex Forum (2009); scarce; $165.00 (€145.20)
 


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

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In Roman religion every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Roman people, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENI EXERCITVS ILLVRICI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the army in Illyria (an area in the western Balkans).

Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RB73735. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 119b (S), Cohen V 56, SRCV III 9404, Hunter III 35 var (EXERC. ILLVRICIANI), VF, superb portrait, nice near black patina, weight 9.594 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, laureate, cuirassed and slightly draped bust right, from front; reverse GENIVS EXERCITVS ILLVRICIANI, Genius standing left, naked except for polos on head and cloak over shoulder, patera in right, cornucopia in left, grounded standard behind, S - C flanking across field; ex Croydon Coin Auction 134 (London, 20 Feb 1996), lot 655; scarce; $165.00 (€145.20)
 


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Annona was the goddess of harvest and her main attribute is grain. This reverse suggests the arrival of grain by sea from the provinces (especially from Africa) and its distribution to the people. By the Code De Naviculariis, the mariners appointed to carry grain from Egypt were capitally punished if they did not keep the proper course; and if they did not sail in the proper season, the master of the vessel was banished.
RB65292. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 981, BMCRE IV 2038, SRCV II 4254, Cohen II -, F, weight 21.364 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 157 - 158 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XXI COS IIII, Annona standing slightly slightly left, stalks of grain pointed downward in her right over modius overflowing with stalks of grain at feet on left, rudder vertical behind in left resting on prow of galley right, S - C flanking low across field; $160.00 (€140.80)
 


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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In 240, the year this coin was struck, a rebellion lead by Sabinianus, the governor of Africa, was defeated in a battle near Carthage.
RB68909. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 293a, Cohen V 390, SRCV III 8745 var (obv leg), VF, nice portrait, well centered, weight 14.938 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, c. 240 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS AVG, Virtus standing left, helmeted, in military garb, branch in right hand, inverted spear in left, grounded shield on left against right leg, S - C flanking across field; $160.00 (€140.80)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Pergamon and Ephesos

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Medallion celebrating the alliance between Ephesus and Pergamum.
SH90561. Brass medallion, Franke-Nolle 1546; BMC Mysia -; RPC online -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG BnF -, aF, rough, pitted, varnished, weight 30.353 g, maximum diameter 41.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, strategos P. Aelius Pius, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse AV KAI M AVPH KOMMO∆OC, laureate and draped bust right, from behind, oval countermark (Severan head?); reverse EΠI CTP Π AI ΠIOY KOINON OMONOIA, Asklepios on left, standing slightly right, snake entwined staff in right hand; cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus on left, standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, arms extended with supports; ΠEPΓAMHNΩN KAI EΦECIΩN in exergue; HUGE 41mm medallion!; very rare; $160.00 (€140.80)
 




  



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