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Eagles on Ancient Coins

Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XII

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This old Caesarean legion was known at different times as Victrix, Antiquae, Paterna and finally XII Fulminata ('the thunderers'). Its veterans settled (among other places) in Patras in Greece. After fighting without great distinction in the First Jewish Revolt, the legion was transferred to Melitene in Cappadocia, where it remained for several hundred years.
RR76782. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/20, Sydenham 1224, BMCRR II East 198, RSC I 34, VF, toned, contact marks, graffiti, weight 3.561 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XII, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $360.00 (€320.40)
 


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG V

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This may have been the famous V Alaudae ('the larks'), a Caesarean legion which remained loyal to Antony but was later retained by Augustus. There are other possibilities, however: V Macedonica, a Caesarean legion about which little is known; V Urbana, disbanded after Actium (and therefore quite likely an Antonian legion); and V Gallica, a Caesarean legion that was probably the one that under Lollius lost its eagle to German raiders in Gaul in 17 B.C.
RS79795. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/18, Sydenham 1221, BMCRR II East 196, RSC I 32, Sear CRI 354, VF, obverse slightly off-center, banker's mark on obverse, weight 3.714 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT AVG III. VIR. R. P. C., galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - V, legionary aquila between two standards; $360.00 (€320.40)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.; Perinthus, Thrace; Galba Countermark

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All the Latin coins of Perinthus are rare. BMC does not list Perinthus mint, but identifies this type as "barbarous." RIC notes the existence of Balkan sestertii, dupondii, and asses but does not catalog them.

RPC attributes the countermark to Nicaea, Bithynia.
RS77050. Bronze as, Mac Dowall CM pl. VII, RPC I 1762, BMCRE I 391 var. (barbarous); c/m: Martini 92, RPC I p. 345 (Nicaea, Bithynia, Apr 68 - Jan 69), VF, c/m: VF, dark blue-green patina, weight 9.665 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, mid 66 - 9 Jun 68 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM IMP, laureate head right, countermark: ΓAΛBA in a rectangular punch; reverse eagle standing facing on ovoid globe, wings open, head right, S - C divided across field above center; rare; $350.00 (€311.50)
 


Kabyle, Thrace, c. 219 - 215 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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The obverse dies for this type were also used with reverse dies naming the Gaulish King Kavaros. Die wear shows the Alexanderine types followed Kavaros' coinage, indicating this type was likely struck during the revolt of the Thracians, which brought about the chieftain's death and the end of Gaulish rule. Kavaros ruled until at least 219 B.C., when he participated in a treaty between Byzantium and Bithynia. The style compares closely with contemporary issues of Dionysopolis, Mesembria, and Odessus.
SH69935. Silver tetradrachm, Price 882a, Draganov Cabyle 845 ff., Müller Alexander 399, VF, weight 16.205 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Cabyle mint, time of the Thracian Revolt, c. 219 - 215 B; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, Demeter standing facing torch in each hand; $330.00 (€293.70)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SH79282. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Price 2646 ff., ADM I 368, gVF, excellent style, well struck on a tight flan, obverse off-center, light marks and corrosion, weight 16.729 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 90o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, as strategos of Asia, 318 - 315 B.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, Γ left, A under throne; nothing (Price 2646), a star (Price 2647), or an ivy leaf (Price 2649A) in exergue; Naville Numismatics Ltd., auction 18, lot 29; $320.00 (€284.80)
 


Istros, Thrace, Late 5th - 4th Century B.C.

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The obverse type has been variously interpreted as representing the Dioscuri, the rising and setting sun, and the two branches of the river Danube. - Greek Coins and Their Values by David Sear.
GS76336. Silver stater, SNG BM Black Sea 230 - 231, SNG Stancomb -, SNG Cop -, AMNG -, BMC Thrace -, gVF, areas of light corrosion, some light marks, tight flan, weight 5.561 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Istros (near Istria, Romania) mint, Late 5th - 4th Century B.C.; obverse Facing male heads, left inverted; reverse IΣTPIH, sea-eagle grasping a dolphin with talons, Γ below eagle; scarce; $300.00 (€267.00)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

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In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
SH60141. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 907a, Prieur 357, SNG Righetti 2027, SNG Cop -, EF, weight 10.949 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in exergue; $250.00 (€222.50)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60149. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Galatia 507, EF, weight 13.825 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome or Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in exergue; double strike evident in obverse legend, minor flan crack, small encrustations, very sharp, handsome portrait and eagle; $250.00 (€222.50)
 


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Posthumous commemorative struck by Marcus Aurelius' son, Commodus.

BMCRE p. 62 notes that the "spear head" variety listed by Cohen is probably from an altered die. We have, however, found coins from more than one reverse die with this object. It is not clear to us why Cohen identified this indistinct object as a spear head.
RS77835. Silver denarius, RSC II 82; RIC III C271; MIR 18 478-4/10, Hunter II 4; BMCRE IV 24 var., note. p. 692, VF, small edge cracks, weight 3.130 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 180 A.D.; obverse DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, spear head(?) in beak; $250.00 (€222.50)
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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Huge bronze! The largest of all Ptolemaic bronze coin types.
GP75643. Bronze octobol, Svoronos 446; Weiser 19; BMC Ptolemies p. 37, 158; SNG Cop 142; Noeske 64; Hosking 13; Malter 67, aF, weight 77.706 g, maximum diameter 46.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head turned back right, E between legs; $240.00 (€213.60)
 


Akragas, Sicily, c. 425 - 406 B.C.

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Located on a plateau overlooking Sicily's southern coast, Akragas was founded c. 582 B.C. by colonists from Gela. It grew rapidly, becoming second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily, but was sacked by Carthage in 406 B.C. and never fully recovered. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GI76960. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati I p. 173, 28; BMC Sicily p. 16, 94; McClean pl. 66, 6; SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG München -; SNG Morcom -; HGC 2 -, aF, dark green patina, weight 16.268 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 180o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 425 - 406 B.C.; obverse AKPA, eagle left, wings open, head lowered, clutching supine hare in talons; reverse crab seen from above, hippocamp left below, three pairs of pellets flanking claws (six total, mark of value), all within a shallow round incuse; very rare; $240.00 (€213.60)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Most people expect the crests on ancient helmets to strictly run from front to back. Officer's helmets, however, frequently had a crest running from ear to ear, as on the helmet used as a control symbol on the reverse of this coin. The two ear flaps dangle below the bowl and visor of the helmet.
SH75314. Silver tetradrachm, Meydancikkale 618 (same obv. die); Mathisen, Administrative VI.1, obv. die A1; Price 629; Müller Alexander 233; SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, centered, golden toning, test cut, light scratches and marks, lamination defect on reverse, weight 16.793 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 90o, Pella (or Amphipolis?) mint, c. 275 - 270 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing on left, ΠAP monogram under seat strut, KE monogram in exergue; ex CNG auction 349, lot 35; $225.00 (€200.25)
 


Graxa, Calabria, Italy, 250 - 200 B.C.

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The location of Graxa has not yet been discovered and the dating of the coinage is also uncertain. Historia Numorum dates this type c. 250 - 200 B.C. Lindgren dates it 200 - 89 B.C.
GB77977. Bronze AE 12, SNG ANS 797, BMC Italy, p. 222, 8 (uncertain Calabria); HN Italy 773; SNG Cop 749; Lindgren II 249 (crescent vice star), VF/F, green patina, earthen deposits, tight flan, weight 1.673 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Graxa mint, 250 - 200 B.C.; obverse cockle shell; reverse eagle right thunderbolt in talons, wings open, star right, ΓPA below; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; very rare; $200.00 (€178.00)
 


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XIX

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Pliny xxxiii 9 notes, ?Antonius as Triumvir mixed iron (sic) into his denarii.? Actually, it was copper that Antony used to debase his denarii and extend his budget. Some coppery spots are clearly visible on the reverse of this coin. Most of Antony's legionary denarii are well worn. The Roman people knew these legionary denarii were debased. When deciding which coins to hoard and save, and which to spend, they would choose good silver to save and spend Antony's debased denarii before all others. Most legionary denarii were heavily circulated and are heavily worn.
RR83582. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/35, Sydenham 1242, BMCRR II East 214, RSC I 55, VF, toned, coppery areas, light scratches and marks, a little off-center, weight 3.681 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 270o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III•VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XIX, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 21, lot 658; $200.00 (€178.00)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Septimius Severus was the commander of Legio XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix when Pertinax was murdered in 193 B.C. After the victory against Didius Julianus, most coins of the legionary series coins honored the soldiers who made their commander an emperor. The legion was raised by Octavian, who made the capricorn its symbol (depicted on coins as well). It is one of the legions that participated at the invasion of Britain under Claudius and later defeated queen Boudica receiving the Martia Victrix cognomen from Nero. The legion later moved to Gaul, then Germany, were it participated to the Saturninus' rebellion. Domitian moved it further East to Pannonia replacing the XXIth Rapax which was destroyed by the Sarmatians. Trajan used it in his Dacian wars. Lucius Verus used it in his Parthian war and Marcus Aurelius used Carnumtum as headquarters for three years during the Marcomannic wars. Only 18 specimens in the Reka Devnia hoard.
RS83527. Silver denarius, RIC IV 14 (S); RSC III 272; BMCRE V p. 22, 19; Hunter III 5; SRCV II 6302, gVF, superb portrait, reverse a little weak, some reverse die wear, edge cracks, weight 3.084 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right; reverse LEG XIIII GEM M V, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards topped with wreaths and decorated with Capricorns, TR P COS in exergue; scarce; $200.00 (€178.00)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In 64 A.D., according to Tacitus, The Great Fire of Rome burned for five and a half days. Only four of the fourteen districts of Rome escaped the fire; three were completely destroyed and another seven seriously damaged. Nero, blaming the Christians, ordered them thrown to dogs, crucified or burned to serve as lights.
RX84430. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 271; Milne 236; Curtis 97; BMC Alexandria p 20, 166; RPC I 5284; Geissen 167; Kampmann-Ganschow 14.83, aVF, nice portrait, tight flan, some legend unstruck, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 64 - 28 Aug 65 A.D.; obverse NEPΩ KΛAY KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP, radiate bust right wearing aegis; reverse AYTOKPA, eagle standing left, head left, wings closed, palm transverse under right wing, L IA (year 11) left, simpulum right; $190.00 (€169.10)
 


Hierapolis-Kastabala, Cilicia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Hierapolis-Kastabala was an ancient city in Cilicia Pedias, three kilometers north ancient Pyramus. Alexander the Great stopped at Kastabala before the Battle of Issus in 333 B.C. Antiochus IV refounded the city with the name Hierapolis. In the first century B.C., Hierapolis was the capital of a small local kingdom under the rule of the former Cilician pirate Tarcondimotus I, an ally of Mark Antony. Cicero referred to the city as Rome's most loyal ally beyond the Taurus and the best friend of the Roman people. The city was known for its temple of Artemis Perasia. Strabo wrote of her priestesses who, in a trance, would walk barefoot over hot coals without damage.
GY73092. Bronze AE 15, cf. CNG e-auction 250, lot 112; otherwise apparently unpublished; SNG BnF -, SNG Levante-, SNGvA-, SNG Cop -, BMC Lycaonia -, F, well centered, highlighting "desert" patina, some corrosion, weight 2.776 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 90o, Hieropolis-Kastabola, Cilicia mint, 2nd - 1st centuries B.C.; obverse radiate, draped bust of Helios right, dotted border; reverse eagle standing left on torch, wings open, head left, IEPOΠOΛITΩN above, ΠPOΣ TΩI ΠYPA[NA?] below; extremely rare; $180.00 (€160.20)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SH75320. Silver drachm, Price P43, Müller Alexander P50, SNG München 938, aEF, some die wear, weight 4.238 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, lyre left; ex Forum (2005); $180.00 (€160.20)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS75252. Silver drachm, ADM II Series XIV, Price 1528, Müller Alexander 1618, SNG Cop 995, SNG München 476, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, toned, full circle obverse, light marks and scratches, weight 4.140 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos(?) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, MI monogram left, Z (appearing as I) under throne; $180.00 (€160.20)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
GS75259. Silver drachm, Price P26, SNG Cop 1099, SNG München 937, Müller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, well centered and struck, fine style, toned, light marks, weight 4.229 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydus(?) mint, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at the neck; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, MH monogram left, horse's leg under throne; $180.00 (€160.20)
 




    



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Catalog current as of Saturday, January 21, 2017.
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