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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Birds>Eagle PAGE 1/14«««1234»»»

Eagles on Ancient Coins


Chalkis, Euboea, Greece, 338 - 330 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Khalkís, also Chalkis or Chalcis, is a city in eastern Greece, capital of the Aegean island department of Euboea (Évvoia), on the strait of Evripos near Athens. The ancient city, inhabited by Ionians, was an important commercial and industrial center. In the 8th and 7th centuries BC, Khalkís was a base for the establishment of colonies in Macedonia (there giving its name to the peninsula of Chalcidice) and in Sicily. It was successively thereafter an Athenian, a Macedonian, and a Roman possession. -- www.greatestcities.com
SH67899. Silver drachm, Picard emission 4; BCD 126 - 127 (different dies); BMC Central p. 110, 48; cf. SNG Cop 433 (amphora), gVF, very nice toning, weight 3.696 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis mint, 338 - 330 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Chalkis right, hair rolled, wearing necklace and single pendant earring; reverse X - AΛ (retrograde), eagle right, wings open, carrying snake in talons and beak, which winds around the birds body, kantharos in right field; $320.00 (€240.00)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), Second Reign, 145 - 116 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Ptolemy VIII and his older brother Ptolemy VI ruled jointly from 170 to 164 B.C. The brothers disagreed and Ptolemy VIII was forced to withdraw to Kyrenaica, which he ruled. After his brother's death, in 145 B.C., he claimed the throne and married Cleopatra II (his brother's widow and also his sister). Later he married Cleopatra III (his niece and stepdaughter) after which relations with Cleopatra II were strained. Ptolemy VIII was unpopular with the Alexandrians, who nicknamed him Physkon (pot belly). --- Greek Coins and Their Values by David R. Sear
SH63045. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1615, SNG Cop 608, SNG Milan -, Noeske -, BMC Ptolemies -, VF, weight 13.344 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Kitium mint, 119 - 118 B.C.; obverse diademed bust right wearing aegis; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, LNB (year 52) left, KI right; scarce mint and coin; $310.00 (€232.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60142. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Syria 507, EF, coppery encrustations, weight 10.570 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 45o, Rome or Antioch (Antakiyah, Syria) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in ex; areas of light corrosion, uncirculated sharp detail, mint luster; $300.00 (€225.00)

Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip I. Philip's eleven-year-old son and heir was likely killed with his father.
SH60144. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1043, Prieur 473; BMC Syria 559; cf. SNG Cop 268 (attributed to Philip I), EF, weight 14.347 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 248 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆, eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C below; a little light corrosion, toned, some remaining luster, sharp detail; $300.00 (€225.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime issue
Click for a larger photo Lifetime issue. This coin was issued during the lifetime and rule of Alexander the Great. Most Alexander coins were issued after his death.
SH60132. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3000, gF, weight 16.787 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 225o, Cilicia, Tarsos mint, c. 333 - 327 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, legs uncrossed, eagle in right, long scepter vertical in left, B under throne; $295.00 (€221.25)

Aspendus, Pamphylia, 188 - 187 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

At the time this coin was struck, the territory of Aspendos was surrounded by the Attalid's Pergamene Kingdom but retained independence.
SH59445. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2904, Müller Alexander 1217, Cohen DCA 312, gF, weight 15.885 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 188 - 187 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in a rectangluar punch; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle extended in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, wreath above AΣ / KE left (year 25 Era of Aspendos); $290.00 (€217.50)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Ptolemy IV's surname, Philopator, means father lover, ironic since according to some authorities he poisoned his father. Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria. He was a cruel and evil monarch.
SH59538. Bronze drachm, Svoronos 992; Weiser 60 (Ptolemy III, 247 - 243 B.C.); SNG Cop 205; SNG Milan 216, Noeske 147, Hosking 36, BMC Ptolemies p. 74, 71 (Ptolemy V), aVF, weight 73.463 g, maximum diameter 41.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs; a massive 73 gram Ptolemaic bronze!; $290.00 (€217.50)

Macedonian Kingdom, Seleukos, Satrap in Babylon, 311 - 306 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Struck in the name of Alexander, this coin also bears the personal badge of Seleukos, an anchor. Seleukos was first appointed satrap in Babylonia in 320 B.C. but was put to flight by Antigonus in 315. He returned in 311 only to be forced to evacuate later that year by a counterattack by Antigonus' son, Demetrius. Not long after, however, Seleukos again recovered the city.
SH60135. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 293, Price 3449 (Marthus), Müller Alexander 1512, aVF/F, weight 16.601 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain mint, c. 311 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, anchor flukes up flanked by ∆ - I in left field, monogram under throne; $290.00 (€217.50)

Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by King Eurystheus (his cousin), was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt, but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
SH60155. Silver tetradrachm, Price 447, VF, weight 16.848 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 90o, Amphipolis mint, posthumous, c. 315 - 294 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆P[OY], Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long scepter vertical in left, right leg drawn back, Λ over torch in left field, monogram under throne; $290.00 (€217.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60149. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Syria 507, EF, weight 13.825 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome or Antioch (Antakiyah, Syria) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in ex; double strike evident in obverse legend, minor flan crack, small encrustations, very sharp, handsome portrait and eagle; $285.00 (€213.75)

Akragas, Sicily, c. 425 - 406 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Akragas was founded early in the 6th century by colonists from Gela. It was second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily, but was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 B.C. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GB69934. Bronze tetras, Calciati I p. 181 ff., 55; SNG Cop 77; SNG ANS 1045; SNG München 133; SNG Morcom 523; HGC 2 140, F, nice green patina, weight 6.432 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Akragas mint, c. 425 - 406 B.C.; obverse AKPA, eagle standing left, wings open, head downward, hare right legs up in its talons; reverse crab, three pellets over crayfish left below; $285.00 (€213.75)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
SH60141. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 907a, Prieur 357, SNG Righetti 2027, SNG Cop -, EF, weight 10.949 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $280.00 (€210.00)

Macrianus, Summer 260 - Early Summer 261 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
SH57022. Silvered antoninianus, RSC IV 8, RIC V 6, SRCV III 10803, F, weight 3.441 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 45o, Antiochia (Antakiyah, Syria) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter seated left, patera in extended right, scepter in left, eagle at feet; rare; $270.00 (€202.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
RP59985. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 925, Prieur 355, EF, mint luster, weight 10.961 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $270.00 (€202.50)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy Nios under Ptolemy II, 268 - 259 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Svoronos knew only the single BMC example. Very rare and missing from most collections.

Ptolemy Nios was the son of Lysimachos and Arsinoe II, as well as the step-son and co-ruler of Ptolemy II from 268 - 259 B.C. He was removed from his co-regency after he rebelled in 259 B.C., but remained as ruler of Telmessos in Lycia until after 240 B.C.
SH64051. Bronze dichalkon, Svoronos 792, pl. XXV, 22 (Ake-Ptolemais); BMC Ptolemies p. 65, 29 (Ptolemy IV, Ptolemais); Ashton Fethiye -; Weiser -; Noeske -; Hosking -, SNG Cop -, VF, weight 5.093 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Lycia, Telmessos mint, c. 260 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, tripod left, ΠTO right; very rare; $270.00 (€202.50)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Antioch, Syria
Click for a larger photo Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo was the Propraetorial Imperial Legate of Roman Syria from 60 - 63 A.D. In 58 A.D. Corbulo, who had been Caligula's brother-in-law, had defeated the Parthians. Tigranes, who grew up in Rome, was installed as king of Armenia. In 63, Armenia again fell under Parthian hegemony. Corbulo crossed the Euphrates with a strong army. The new Armenian king Tiridates refused battle, laid down his diadem at the foot of the emperor's statue, and promised not to resume it until he received it from the hand of Nero himself in Rome. In 67, Nero, suspicious of Corbulo and his support among the Roman masses, summoned him to Greece. On his arrival at Cenchreae, the port of Corinth, messengers from Nero met Corbulo, and ordered him to commit suicide, which he loyally obeyed by falling on his own sword, saying, "Axios!"
SH66235. Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 82 (same reverse die); McAlee 258; RPC I 4182; BMC Galatia p. 174, 192; cf. SNG Cop 154 (Z / ΘP), VF, weight 14.760 g, maximum diameter 24.66 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 61 - 62 A.D.; obverse NEPΩNOΣ KAIΣAPOΣ ΣEBAΣTOY, laureate beardless bust right wearing aegis; reverse eagle standing left on a thunderbolt, wings spread, head left, palm frond on left, H (regnal year 8) over IP (year 110 of the Caesarian era) on right (off flan); $270.00 (€202.50)

Seleucid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Babylonia, In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Price dates this type 311 - 305 B.C. Houghton dates it 311 - 300 B.C. Houghton notes that Kritt down-dated the chronology due to the complexity of the emissions and two hoards that support the revised dating. Since it seems Antigonus managed to conquer Babylon in 310 B.C., the type should be dated after Seleukos recovered the city.
GS56726. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton 82, cf. Price 3753 ff. (various controls left), F, weight 16.880 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, Babylon mint, c. 309 - 300 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, controls letters off flan on left, monogram in wreath under throne; high-relief obverse; $260.00 (€195.00)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo "And the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch." -- Acts 11:26
SH60147. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 902, Prieur 371, EF, weight 11.716 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing facing, head and tail right, wreath in beak, wings spread, ANTIOXIA S C in ex; grainy areas of light corrosion, areas of mint luster, sharp detail, good portrait; $260.00 (€195.00)

Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG IV
Click for a larger photo This may have been IV Scythica, which could have been a legion raised by Antony (although little is known about its early history). It is less likely to have been the IV Macedonica, an Antonian legion that deserted to Octavian.
SH63666. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/17, Sydenham 1219, BMC 195, RSC I 30, F, weight 3.290 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 45o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III•VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - IV, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards, border of dots; $250.00 (€187.50)

Aegium, Achaea, Greece, c. 37 - 31 B.C., Under Antony and Cleopatra
Click for a larger photo Kroll connected the types with Antony and Cleopatra, who controlled Achaea when this coin was struck. Dionysos refers to Antony, who called himself the "new Dionysos," and the typically Ptolemaic eagle symbolizes Cleopatra.
GB67910. Bronze tetrachalkon, BCD Peloponnesos 438 - 439, BMC Peloponnesus 6 - 7, Kroll Bronze 3, Weber 3954, F, weight 3.916 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Aegium mint, Theoxios and Kletaios, magistrates, c. 37 - 31 B.C; obverse AIΓIEΩN, head of young Dionysos right, wreathed in ivy; reverse ΘEOΞIOΣ KAHTAIOΣ, eagle standing left, head left, wings closed; rare; $250.00 (€187.50)



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Catalog current as of Wednesday, April 23, 2014.
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Eagles