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Eagles on Ancient Coins

Kings of Thrace, Thracian Kainoi, Mostis, c. 126 - 86 B.C.

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Mostis, reigned c. 126 - 86 B.C., was king of the Thracian Kainoi (Caeni) tribe in South East Thrace to Strandzha mountain, territory in Bulgaria and Turkey today. He king is best known from his coinage, which includes bronze coins and rare tetradrachms.
GB77206. Bronze AE 20, SNG BM 311 - 312, Youroukova 134, SNG Stancomb -, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, green patina, some light corrosion, weight 4.750 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, c. 126 - 86 B.C.; obverse jugate heads of Zeus and Hera right; countermark: monogram; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / MOΣTI∆OΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, monogram above right; very rare; $360.00 (€306.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Achaios, 220 - 214 B.C.

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Achaios was an uncle of Antiochos III. He proclaimed himself King in Anatolia. After a two-year siege of his capital of Sardes, Lydia, he was captured and beheaded.
GY76100. Bronze AE 15, Houghton-Lorber I 956 var. (unlisted control symbol), SNG Spaer 834 var. (same), Newell WSM 1442 var. (same), HGC 9 436 (S-R1), VF, nice green patina, weight 3.314 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 220 - autumn or winter 214 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse eagle standing right, head right, wings closed, wreath in talons, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / AXAIOY in two flanking downward lines, X (control symbol) outer right; unpublished extremely rare variant; $340.00 (€289.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, Strategos of Asia, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander

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After the battle of Issos, Alexander determined to seize the Phoenician coast and eliminate the threat of the Phoenician warships which had served Persia. He asked King Azemilkos of Tyre to allow him to enter the city to sacrifice to the god Melqart. After Azemilkos refused to make this act of submission, in January 332 B.C., Alexander besieged Tyre. The city was taken, after great violence, in September.

The name of the king of Tyre whose regnal year dates this coin is unknown. The king and his city were under the hegemony of Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed"), the Macedonian strategos (general and governor) of Asia. Antigonus declared himself king in 306 B.C. and died at the battle of Ipsus in 301 B.C.
GS86198. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3298, Newell Dated 47, Cohen DCA 738 (R1), Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, toned, attractive style, obverse a little off center, die wear, bumps and marks, weight 17.166 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 300o, Tyre mint, 311 - 310 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aėtophoros seated left, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, Phoenician date left (read right to left): ll lll lll (regnal year 8); rare; $320.00 (€272.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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After Alexander's death, many cities cleverly continued to strike coins in the name of Alexander, maintaining neutrality, rather than favoring any one of the Diadochi (Alexander's successors). Although Greece was declared "free" in 311 B.C., it soon became a chaotic battleground. Old men, once comrades in Alexander's army, along with their children, fought each other to death to expand their kingdoms. Ptolemy I of Egypt took Corinth from Antigonus in 308. Demetrius Poliorcetes defeated Ptolemy and returned to Greece in 302 B.C. Claiming to be a liberator, he reinstated the Corinthian League.
GS86197. Silver tetradrachm, Price 671; Troxell Peloponnesian, pl. xix, 6; SNG München -; SNG Cop -; SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, high relief, toned, bumps, marks and scratches, areas of porosity, weight 16.454 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 165o, Greece, Corinth mint, posthumous, c. 310 - 290 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aėtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, dove flying left surrounded by wreath in left field, H under throne; extremely rare - only a few examples known to Forum; $300.00 (€255.00)
 


Istros, Thrace, c. 280 - 255 B.C.

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The obverse type has been variously interpreted as representing the Dioscuri, the rising and setting sun, and the two branches of the river Danube. - Greek Coins and Their Values by David Sear.
GS86906. Silver drachm, Dima subgroup VI, 1, pl. XIX, 2 (same obv. die); AMNG I/I 425; SNG Stancomb 148; SNG BM 256 var. (right head inverted); SNG Cop -; BMC Thrace -, VF, toned, flan flaws, flan cracks, weight 4.652 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 90o, Istros (near Istria, Romania) mint, c. 280 - 256/255 B.C.; obverse two facing male heads, left head inverted; reverse IΣTPIH, sea-eagle grasping a dolphin with talons, ΦY (control) below dolphin; $300.00 (€255.00)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

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On 11 February 244, Emperor Gordian III was murdered by mutinous soldiers in Zaitha (Mesopotamia). Philip the Arab (Marcus Julius Philippus) declared himself emperor and made a disgraceful peace with the Sasanian Empire, withdrawing from their territory and giving Shapur 500,000 gold pieces. The Sasanians occupied Armenia. Philip was recognized by the Roman Senate as Emperor and he nominated his son Philippus, age 6, as Caesar and heir to the throne. He gave his brother Priscus supreme power (rector Orientis) in the Eastern provinces; and began construction of the city of Shahba, Syria in the province of his birth.
RY85323. Billon tetradrachm, Prieur 321 (1 spec.); McAlee 889 (v. rare); BMC Galatia p. 212, 505, EF, sharp attractive portrait, attractive iridescent toning, parts of legends weak, areas of some porosity, weight 13.256 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 1st issue, 244 A.D.; obverse AVTOK K M IOV Λ ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust left, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing slightly left on palm frond, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; very rare; $270.00 (€229.50)
 


Akragas, Sicily, 450 - 440 B.C.

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Located on a plateau overlooking Sicily's southern coast, Akragas was founded c. 582 B.C. by colonists from Gela. It grew rapidly, becoming second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by Carthage in 406 B.C. and never fully recovered. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GI76829. Cast bronze trias, Calciati I, p. 143, 1; Westermark Fifth pl. I, 1; SNG Cop 61; SNG ANS 1015; SNG Lloyd 832; HGC 2 126 (R1);, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, some light corrosion, weight 16.186 g, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, 450 - 440 B.C.; cast near tooth-shaped flattened cone form, four pellets on flat top, sea-eagle standing left on one side, crab opposite; rare; $250.00 (€212.50)
 


Amisos, Pontos, 85 - 65 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB85026. Bronze AE 31, SNG BM 1145; SNG Cop 132; SNGvA 55; SNG Stancomb 675; BMC Pontus p. 15, 22; Rec Gen 15; HGC 237 (S), VF, well centered on a broad flan, green patina, porous areas, weight 18.944 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head turned right, wings open, ΩΣ monogram left, AMIΣOY below; scarce; $250.00 (€212.50)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60149. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Galatia 507, EF, very sharp, handsome portrait and eagle, double strike evident in obverse legend, minor flan crack, small encrustations,, weight 13.825 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome or Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C (senatus consulto) below wings, MON VRB in exergue; FORVM paid $225 for this coin!; $225.00 (€191.25)
 


Halikarnassos, Caria, c. 400 - 387 B.C.

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Halicarnassus was in southwest Caria on a picturesque, advantageous site on the Ceramic Gulf. It was famous for the tomb of Mausolus, the origin of the word mausoleum, built between 353 B.C. and 350 B.C., and one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. It was part of the Persian Empire until captured by Alexander the Great at the siege of Halicarnassus in 334 B.C. The site is now occupied in part by the town of Bodrum; but the ancient walls can still be traced round nearly all their circuit, and the position of several of the temples, the theater, and other public buildings can be fixed with certainty.
GS86730. Silver drachm, Hecatomnus 5 (A4/P5); SNG Keckman 40; SNG Kayhan 759; BMC Caria p. 102, 3; SNG Cop -, VF, rough, corrosion, lamination defects, weight 3.214 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, Halikarnassos (Bodrum, Turkey) mint, c. 400 - 387 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo facing slightly right; reverse eagle standing right, wings open, AΛIKAP upper left, olive sprig lower right, all within an incuse square; scarce; $225.00 (€191.25)
 


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Posthumous commemorative struck by Marcus Aurelius' son, Commodus.
RS85773. Silver denarius, Szaivert MIR 18 p. 142, 482/4; RIC III C273 (S) var., RSC II 91 var., BMCRE IV C20 692 var. , Hunter II 3 var., SRCV II 5974 (all var. no wreath), Choice VF, well centered, attractive style, light tone, edge cracks, weight 2.921 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, 180 A.D.; obverse DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right on globe, head left, wreath in beak; rare variety; $200.00 (€170.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Peithon, Satrap of Babylon, c. 315 - Autumn 312 B.C.; In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Struck by Peithon, son of Agenor, the Macedonian satrap in Babylon, 315 - 312 B.C. Peithon was a successful officer under Alexander, first mentioned as the commander of a phalanx battalion in January 325 in the battles against the Mallians in the southern Punjab. Alexander made him satrap of the Indus in 325 B.C. In 315 B.C., Antigonos Monophthalmos forced Seleukos to flee Babylon and replaced him with Peithon. Peithon fought alongside Antigonus Monophthalmus against Cassander and Ptolemy, in 314 B.C. He was killed in autumn 312 B.C., at the Battle of Gaza where the forces of Demetrius, the son of Antigonus, were defeated by Ptolemy.
GS86195. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3733, Müller Alexander 719, SNG Cop 842, SNG Alpha Bank 688 var. (slight var. in monogram under throne), SNG München -, VF, rough, burnished, obverse a little off center, weight 15.496 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Babylon mint, 315 - 312 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aėtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, MYHP monogram in wreath left, ΠAP monogram in circle under throne; $200.00 (€170.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS84664. Silver drachm, Price 1382, Müller Alexander 612, SNG Cop 887, SNG Alpha Bank 578, SNG Saroglos 705, ADM II series X, SNG Munchen -, VF/gF, nice style, well centered on a tight flan, toned, reverse double struck, scratches and marks, some porosity, weight 4.094 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aėtophoros seated left on backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left hand, forepart of Pegasos left, No monogram under throne; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck after Alexander the Great's death during the joint reign of Philip III, Alexander's brother, and the infant king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. Magnesia also struck nearly identical drachms during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but the Alexander named on this coin was more likely the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV.
GS76143. Silver drachm, Hersh 107, Price 1946 corr. (thyrsus left), Müller Alexander 663, SNG Cop -, SNG Munchen -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Saroglos -, VF, light toning, porosity, light corrosion, bumps, light scratches, reverse slightly off center, weight 4.222 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, struck under Menander or Kleito, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aėtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, thyrsus behind throne (inner right); $150.00 (€127.50)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS84682. Silver drachm, Price 1801, Müller Alexander 1336, SNG Alpha Bank 613, SNG Saroglos 1743, SNG Munchen -, VF, well struck with high relief dies, very light corrosion, scratches, weight 4.199 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - c. 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aėtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, B left, N under throne; $150.00 (€127.50)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Most references list this type as a quadrans but examples without a thick patina, including this coin, appear to be orichalcum (brass) vice copper. Yellow brass indicates the type is a semis.
RB85750. Orichalcum semis, RIC II 625 (S), BMCRE III 1279, Cohen II 1167 (5 fr.), SRCV II 3704, Strack II 579, Hunter II 380 var. (standing left, head right), VF, Tiber patina, tight flan, corrosion, weight 2.104 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 120 - 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, eagle standing half right, head turned left, wings open but not spread; reverse P M TR P COS III, horizontal winged thunderbolt, S C (senatus consulto) below; scarce; $150.00 (€127.50)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SH75320. Silver drachm, Price P43, Müller Alexander P50, SNG Munchen 938, aEF, some die wear, weight 4.238 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus Aėtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, lyre left; ex Forum (2005); $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS76140. Silver drachm, Price 1798, Müller Alexander 271, SNG Cop 924, SNG Munchen 518, SNG Saroglos 740, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, well centered and struck, toned, light marks, weight 4.214 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - c. 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aėtophoros seated left on throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long lotus tipped scepter vertical behind in left hand, crescent horns right in left field, N under throne below strut; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Dia, Bithynia, 85 - 65 B.C.

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Mithradates VI Eupator "the Great"expanded his Pontic Kingdom through conquest, which inevitably brought him into conflict with Rome. Mithradates regarded himself as the champion of the Greeks against Rome, however, after three years of war, he was defeated by Pompey the Great.
GB79968. Bronze AE 21, SNG Stancomb 807; SNGvA 347; Callata˙ pl. XLIX, B; Rec Gen p. 342, 3; HGC 7 453 (S); SNG BM 1560 ff. var. (no monogram r.); SNG Cop 404 var. (same), gVF, attractive style, well struck on a tight flan, nice green patina, weight 7.690 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Dias mint, under Mithradates VI of Pontos, 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse laureate, bearded head of Zeus right; reverse eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, monograms left and right, ∆IAΣ below; rare city; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Kings of Galatia, Deiotaros, c. 64 - 40 B.C.

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Deiotarus was chief of the Celtic Tolistobogii tribe in western Galatia and became King of Galatia. He was a faithful ally of Rome against Mithridates VI of Pontus, for which he was rewarded by Pompey. Caesar pardoned him for siding with Pompey in the civil war but he was deprived of some of his dominions. After Caesar's death, Mark Antony, for a large payment, publicly announced that, in accordance with instructions left by Caesar, Deiotarus was to resume possession of all the territory of which he had been deprived. When civil war broke out again, Deiotarus supported the anti-Caesarian party of Brutus and Cassius, but after the Battle of Philippi in 42 B.C., he went over to the triumvirs. He retained his kingdom until his death at a very advanced age.
GB84653. Bronze AE 18, Arslan K1; RPC I p. 536, 2; SNGvA 6099; HGC 7 775 (R1); BMC Galatia -; SNG Cop -, gVF, glossy dark green patina, slightest porosity, weight 5.923 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 45o, Pessinus (Ballihisar, Turkey) mint, c. 63 - 58 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse eagle standing left on fulmen (thunderbolt), head right, wings slightly open, monogram (∆HIOTAP) left; rare; $140.00 (€119.00)
 




    



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Catalog current as of Thursday, May 24, 2018.
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