<Please login or register to view your wish list!

MAIN MENU    RECENT ADDITIONS    PRICE REDUCTIONS
ROMAN    GREEK    JUDEAN & BIBLICAL    BYZANTINE
BOOKS & SUPPLIES    COLLECTING THEMES    ANTIQUITIES   

 

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Collecting Themes
Collecting Themes Showcase

Animals (510)
Birds (272)
Christian
Denominations (261)
Geography (259)
Gods, Olympians (630)
Gods, Non-Olympian (328)
Heros (138)
History (141)
Jewish
Military (383)
Mythology (12)
Nautical & Marine (110)
Numismatics (674)
Personifications (262)
Provenance (19)
Quality (244)
Types (552)

Catalog Search
View Shopping Cart
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Contact Us
FAQ

Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Birds>Eagle PAGE 1/12«««1234»»»

Eagles on Ancient Coins


Danubian Celts or Geto-Dacians, 3rd - 2nd Century B.C., Imitative of Philip III of Macedonia
Click for a larger photo
SH90804. Silver tetradrachm, Lanz 904; CCCBM I 185; cf. Dembski 1466, gVF, high relief obverse, lightly toned, weight 17.211 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 180o, tribal mint, 3rd - 2nd Century B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; two monograms in left field, Z below throne; ex CNG Auction 328, lot 250; CNG Auction 76/1 (12 September 2007), lot 12; Ponterio 97 (10 November 1998), lot 308; $400.00 (€300.00) ON RESERVE

Corinth, Greece, c. 310 - 290 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Although Greece was declared "free" in 311 B.C., it soon became a chaotic battleground of Alexander's successors. Old men, once comrades in Alexander's army, along with their children, fought each other to death to expand their kingdoms. Ptolemy I of Egypt took Corinth from Antigonus in 308. Demetrius Poliorcetes defeated Ptolemy and returned to Greece in 302 B.C. Claiming to be a liberator, he reinstated the Corinthian League. This type and other similar types from Corinth share identical style and control letters with coins struck by nearby cities, suggesting all were struck under the reinstated league.
SH90205. Silver tetradrachm, Price 685, Müller Alexander 889, SNG München 379, SNG Cop 732 (Sicyon), SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Saroglos -, VF, small spots of dark toning, weight 16.902 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, posthumous, c. 310 - 290 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, apluster left, ∆E under throne; ex CNG auction 324, part of lot 690; $400.00 SALE PRICE $360.00 ON RESERVE

Macedonian Kingdom, Kassander, Regent 317 - 305 B.C., King 305 - 298 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander III
Click for a larger photo Son of the regent Antipater, but not his heir, Kassander seized power from Polyperchon after his father's death. He had no intention of surrendering rule to Alexander's son, who was to be king when he came of age. In 311 B.C., Kassander had Alexander's 12-year old son and the boy's mother, Roxane, executed. In 305 B.C., he declared himself king of Macedonia. Kassander struck bronze coinage in his own name, but he struck silver coinage in the name and types of Alexander the Great.
SH90204. Silver tetradrachm, Price 468, Müller Alexander 60, SNG Cop 697, SNG Saroglos 306, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, centered, toned, small spots of dark toning, weight 17.018 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 135o, Amphipolis mint, c. 315 - 294 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, L over race torch left, kantharos under throne; ex CNG auction 324, part of lot 690; $350.00 (€262.50)

Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Most people expect the crests on ancient helmets to strictly run from front to back. Officer's helmets, however, frequently had a crest running from ear to ear, as on the helmet used as a control symbol on the reverse of this coin. The two ear flaps dangle below the bowl and visor of the helmet.
SH90208. Silver tetradrachm, Price 624, Müller Alexander 225, Meydancikkale 407, Mathisen 26.5, Wartenberg-Kagan 34, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG München -, VF, attractive style, bump behind Herakles eye, weight 16.999 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, c. 275 - 270 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing on left, ΘE monogram under seat strut, YE monogram in exergue; ex CNG auction 324, part of lot 690; $340.00 (€255.00)

Seleucid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C., Ancient Counterfeit
Click for a larger photo Although there are no breaks in the plating, fine creases on the obverse appear to show the edges of the fused silver foil. A raised area on the reverse from 3:00 to 6:00 is likely due to oxidation of a bronze core below. The official style combined with softness of detail strongly indicates this counterfeit was likely struck with transfer dies. The Laodikea ad Mare mint prototype is rare.
SH90209. Fouree silver plated tetradrachm, cf. Houghton-Lorber 576(3), Newell WSM 1221, Meydancikkale 308, HGC 9 235 (official, solid silver, Laodicea ad Mar mint, rare), VF, no breaks in the silver plating, weight 16.914 g, maximum diameter 31.1 mm, die axis 45o, unofficial criminal mint, c. 261 - 200 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, dolphin left over monogram on left; BA below throne, ΣEΛEYKOY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; ex CNG auction 324, part of lot 690; $340.00 (€255.00)

Akragas (Agrigentum), Sicily, c. 450 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Located on a plateau overlooking Sicily's southern coast, Akragas was founded c. 582 B.C. by colonists from Gela. It grew rapidly, becoming second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily, but was sacked by Carthage in 406 B.C. and never fully recovered. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
SH65985. Cast bronze hexas, Calciati I p. 146, 7; BMC Sicily p. 24, 5; SNG Cop 63; SNG ANS -; conical tooth-like shape with round base, VF, weight 7.156 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Akragas mint, c. 450 B.C.; obverse AK, eagle standing left; reverse crab; two pellets on base; rare; $320.00 (€240.00)

Chalkis, Euboea, Greece, 338 - 330 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Khalkís, also Chalkis or Chalcis, is a city in eastern Greece, capital of the Aegean island department of Euboea (Évvoia), on the strait of Evripos near Athens. The ancient city, inhabited by Ionians, was an important commercial and industrial center. In the 8th and 7th centuries BC, Khalkís was a base for the establishment of colonies in Macedonia (there giving its name to the peninsula of Chalcidice) and in Sicily. It was successively thereafter an Athenian, a Macedonian, and a Roman possession. -- www.greatestcities.com
SH67899. Silver drachm, Picard emission 4; BCD 126 - 127 (different dies); BMC Central p. 110, 48; cf. SNG Cop 433 (amphora), gVF, very nice toning, weight 3.696 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis mint, 338 - 330 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Chalkis right, hair rolled, wearing necklace and single pendant earring; reverse X - AΛ (retrograde), eagle right, wings open, carrying snake in talons and beak, which winds around the birds body, kantharos in right field; $320.00 (€240.00)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60142. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Galatia 507, EF, coppery encrustations, weight 10.570 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 45o, Rome or Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in ex; areas of light corrosion, uncirculated sharp detail, mint luster; $300.00 (€225.00)

Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip I. Philip's eleven-year-old son and heir was likely killed with his father.
SH60144. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1043, Prieur 473; BMC Galatia 559; cf. SNG Cop 268 (attributed to Philip I), EF, weight 14.347 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 248 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆, eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C below; a little light corrosion, toned, some remaining luster, sharp detail; $300.00 (€225.00)

Roman Republic, A. Postumius A.f. Sp. n. Albinus, c. 81 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Refers to the praetorship of L. Postumius Albinus over Spain and his successful expeditions against the Vaccaei and Lusitani, and the levying of troops for this campaign.
SH70564. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 297, Sydenham 746, Crawford 372/2, RSC I Postumia 8, VF, toned, weight 3.970 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 81 B.C.; obverse HISPAN behind veiled head of Hispania right with disheveled hair; reverse togate figure standing left extending hand toward legionary eagle before him, fasces and axe behind, A• / ALBIN / N•S• vertical downward in fields from left to right, POST A.F. in ex; $300.00 (€225.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime issue
Click for a larger photo Lifetime issue. This coin was issued during the lifetime and rule of Alexander the Great. Most Alexander coins were issued after his death.
SH60132. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3000, gF, weight 16.787 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 225o, Cilicia, Tarsos mint, c. 333 - 327 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, legs uncrossed, eagle in right, long scepter vertical in left, B under throne; $295.00 (€221.25)

Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon, 344 - 336 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Threatened by Carthage and dominated by Hiketas, the tyrant of Leontini, Syracusans sent an appeal for help to their mother city, Corinth. By a unanimous vote Corinth selected Timoleon to set sail for Sicily with a few leading citizens of Corinth and a small troop of Greek mercenaries. After defeating Hiketas, Timoleon put order to Syracuse' affairs and established a democratic government. He repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island. Timoleon then retired without any title or office, though he remained practically supreme. He became blind before his death, but when important issues were under discussion he was carried to the assembly to give his opinion, which was usually accepted. When he died the citizens of Syracuse erected a monument to his memory, afterward surrounded with porticoes, and a gymnasium called Timoleonteum.
SH56004. Bronze hemidrachm, Calciati II p. 168, 72 st 3; SNG ANS 477 ff.; SNG Cop 727;, VF, weight 15.209 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, c. 342 - 338 B.C.; obverse ZEYΣEA − EY−ΘEPTOΣ, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios right; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, thunderbolt; on right, eagle with wings closed standing right; $290.00 (€217.50)

Aspendus, Pamphylia, 195 - 194 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

When this coin was struck, Antiochos III the Great had recovered central Asia Minor for the Seleukid Kingdom. Aspendos accepted Seleukid authority in 197 B.C. The city surrendered to Rome in 190 B.C.
SH59525. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2897, SNG Cop 771, Cohen DCA 312, VF, weight 16.722 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 195 - 194 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in roughly rectangular punch; reverse Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, AΣ / IH (year 18 Era of Aspendos) left; $290.00 (€217.50)

Macedonian Kingdom, Seleukos, Satrap in Babylon, 311 - 306 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Struck in the name of Alexander, this coin also bears the personal badge of Seleukos, an anchor. Seleukos was first appointed satrap in Babylonia in 320 B.C. but was put to flight by Antigonus in 315. He returned in 311 only to be forced to evacuate later that year by a counterattack by Antigonus' son, Demetrius. Not long after, however, Seleukos again recovered the city.
SH60135. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 293, Price 3449 (Marthus), Müller Alexander 1512, aVF/F, weight 16.601 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain mint, c. 311 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, anchor flukes up flanked by ∆ - I in left field, monogram under throne; $290.00 (€217.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60149. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Galatia 507, EF, weight 13.825 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome or Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in ex; double strike evident in obverse legend, minor flan crack, small encrustations, very sharp, handsome portrait and eagle; $285.00 (€213.75)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
SH60141. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 907a, Prieur 357, SNG Righetti 2027, SNG Cop -, EF, weight 10.949 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $280.00 (€210.00)

Akragas, Sicily, c. 425 - 406 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Akragas was founded early in the 6th century by colonists from Gela. It was second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily, but was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 B.C. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GB69934. Bronze tetras, Calciati I p. 181 ff., 55; SNG Cop 77; SNG ANS 1045; SNG München 133; SNG Morcom 523; HGC 2 140, F, nice green patina, weight 6.432 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Akragas mint, c. 425 - 406 B.C.; obverse AKPA, eagle standing left, wings open, head downward, hare right legs up in its talons; reverse crab, three pellets over crayfish left below; $280.00 (€210.00)

Macrianus, Summer 260 - Early Summer 261 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
SH57022. Silvered antoninianus, RSC IV 8, RIC V 6, SRCV III 10803, F, weight 3.441 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter seated left, patera in extended right, scepter in left, eagle at feet; rare; $270.00 (€202.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
RP59985. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 925, Prieur 355, EF, mint luster, weight 10.961 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $270.00 (€202.50)

Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Possibly a lifetime issue! Alexander allowed local princes in the East to continue to rule, if they submitted to him without a struggle. He also reaffirmed the rights of coinage they had as dynasts under Persia. Newell interpreted the monogram on this type as A∆PA, for King Adramelek, whose name appeared on preceding autonomous coinage of the city. - Newell, Demanhur pp. 123 - 125.
SH90199. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3426, Müller Alexander 1375, Demanhur 3587 - 3623, SNG München 744, SNG Cop 805, VF, dark thick toning, weight 17.632 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Byblos mint, c. 330 - 320 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, A∆PA(?) monogram left; ex CNG auction 324, part of lot 691; $290.00 SALE PRICE $261.00 ON RESERVE



ITEMS PER PAGE 13510203050 PAGE 1/12«««1234»»»

OUR FINEST COINS ARE LISTED FIRST. CLICK TO THE LAST PAGE FOR OUR BARGAINS.

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Thursday, July 24, 2014.
Page created in 2.808 seconds
Eagles