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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Birds>Eagle PAGE 1/12«««1234»»»

Eagles on Ancient Coins


Britannicus, Son of Claudius and Messalina, 12 February 41 - 11 February 55 A.D., Aeolis, Aegae
Click for a larger photo Tiberius Claudius Britannicus was born in 41 A.D., son of Cladius I and Messalina. Although the natural heir to the empire, Britannicus was passed over in favor of Nero who then had him murdered a year after his fathers' death.
SH54008. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2431 (4 specimens), SNG Cop -, Fair, weight 3.696 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aegae mint, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse BPETANNIKOC KAICAP, bare head of Britannicus right; reverse AIΓAEΩN EΠI XAΛEOY, Zeus standing left, head facing, eagle in right, long scepter behind in left; extremely rare; $390.00 (€292.50)

Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XII
Click for a larger photo This old Caesarean legion was known at different times as Victrix, Antiquae, Paterna and finally XII Fulminata ('the thunderers'). Its veterans settled (among other places) in Patras in Greece. After fighting without great distinction in the First Jewish Revolt, the legion was transferred to Melitene in Cappadocia, where it remained for several hundred years.
SH71043. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/20, Sydenham 1224, BMCRR II East 198, RSC I 34, VF, a little rough but excellent detail, corrosion and a few marks, well centered on a tight flan, weight 3.565 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - XII, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards, border of dots; $350.00 (€262.50)

Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Most people expect the crests on ancient helmets to strictly run from front to back. Officer's helmets, however, frequently had a crest running from ear to ear, as on the helmet used as a control symbol on the reverse of this coin. The two ear flaps dangle below the bowl and visor of the helmet.
SH90208. Silver tetradrachm, Price 624, Müller Alexander 225, Meydancikkale 407, Mathisen 26.5, Wartenberg-Kagan 34, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG München -, VF, attractive style, bump behind Herakles eye, weight 16.999 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, c. 275 - 270 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing on left, ΘE monogram under seat strut, YE monogram in exergue; ex CNG auction 324, part of lot 690; $340.00 (€255.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Struck under Antipater, Polyperchon, or Kassander. While Alexander was conquering the East, he left Antipater behind as regent of Macedonia and general (strategos) of Europe. Alexander decided to remove Antipater in 323, but died soon after and Antipater retained his position. There were rumors that Antipater was responsible for Alexander's death. The new regent, Perdiccas also decided to remove Antipater, but Perdiccas was murdered and Antipater again retained his position. In 321 Antipater appointed himself supreme regent of all Alexander's empire. In 320, Polyperchon was made regent in Macedonia when Antipater left for Asia Minor to assert his authority as supreme regent for the entire empire. Upon Antipater's death in 319, Polyperchon was made supreme regent of the empire. Antipater's son Kassander, who was to have been Polyperchon's chief lieutenant, rebelled. Polyperchon was defeated in the civil war and Kassander declared himself supreme regent in 317.
SH90966. Silver tetradrachm, Price 205, Müller Alexander 507, Demanhur 1595 - 1596, Moore Pella 18 - 22, VF, high relief, toned, obverse off center, marks and scratches, weight 16.958 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, c. 325 - 315 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left on backless throne, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, large bee in left field, nothing below throne; rare; $340.00 (€255.00)

Akragas (Agrigentum), Sicily, c. 450 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Located on a plateau overlooking Sicily's southern coast, Akragas was founded c. 582 B.C. by colonists from Gela. It grew rapidly, becoming second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily, but was sacked by Carthage in 406 B.C. and never fully recovered. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
SH65985. Cast bronze hexas, Calciati I p. 146, 7; BMC Sicily p. 24, 5; SNG Cop 63; SNG ANS -; conical tooth-like shape with round base, VF, weight 7.156 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Akragas mint, c. 450 B.C.; obverse AK, eagle standing left; reverse crab; two pellets on base; rare; $320.00 (€240.00)

Chalkis, Euboea, Greece, 338 - 330 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Khalkís, also Chalkis or Chalcis, is a city in eastern Greece, capital of the Aegean island department of Euboea (Évvoia), on the strait of Evripos near Athens. The ancient city, inhabited by Ionians, was an important commercial and industrial center. In the 8th and 7th centuries BC, Khalkís was a base for the establishment of colonies in Macedonia (there giving its name to the peninsula of Chalcidice) and in Sicily. It was successively thereafter an Athenian, a Macedonian, and a Roman possession. -- www.greatestcities.com
SH67899. Silver drachm, Picard emission 4; BCD 126 - 127 (different dies); BMC Central p. 110, 48; cf. SNG Cop 433 (amphora), gVF, very nice toning, weight 3.696 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis mint, 338 - 330 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Chalkis right, hair rolled, wearing necklace and single pendant earring; reverse X - AΛ (retrograde), eagle right, wings open, carrying snake in talons and beak, which winds around the birds body, kantharos in right field; $320.00 (€240.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Kassander, Regent 317 - 305 B.C., King 305 - 298 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander III
Click for a larger photo Son of the regent Antipater, but not his heir, Kassander seized power from Polyperchon after his father's death. He had no intention of surrendering rule to Alexander's son, who was to be king when he came of age. In 311 B.C., Kassander had Alexander's 12-year old son and the boy's mother, Roxane, executed. In 305 B.C., he declared himself king of Macedonia. Kassander struck bronze coinage in his own name, but he struck silver coinage in the name and types of Alexander the Great.
SH90204. Silver tetradrachm, Price 468, Müller Alexander 60, SNG Cop 697, SNG Saroglos 306, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, centered, toned, small spots of dark toning, weight 17.018 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 135o, Amphipolis mint, c. 315 - 294 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, L over race torch left, kantharos under throne; ex CNG auction 324, part of lot 690; $310.00 (€232.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60142. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Galatia 507, EF, coppery encrustations, weight 10.570 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 45o, Rome or Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in ex; areas of light corrosion, uncirculated sharp detail, mint luster; $300.00 (€225.00)

Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip I. Philip's eleven-year-old son and heir was likely killed with his father.
SH60144. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1043, Prieur 473; BMC Galatia 559; cf. SNG Cop 268 (attributed to Philip I), EF, weight 14.347 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 248 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆, eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C below; a little light corrosion, toned, some remaining luster, sharp detail; $300.00 (€225.00)

Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon, 344 - 336 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Threatened by Carthage and dominated by Hiketas, the tyrant of Leontini, Syracusans sent an appeal for help to their mother city, Corinth. By a unanimous vote Corinth selected Timoleon to set sail for Sicily with a few leading citizens of Corinth and a small troop of Greek mercenaries. After defeating Hiketas, Timoleon put order to Syracuse' affairs and established a democratic government. He repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island. Timoleon then retired without any title or office, though he remained practically supreme. He became blind before his death, but when important issues were under discussion he was carried to the assembly to give his opinion, which was usually accepted. When he died the citizens of Syracuse erected a monument to his memory, afterward surrounded with porticoes, and a gymnasium called Timoleonteum.
SH56004. Bronze hemidrachm, Calciati II p. 168, 72 st 3; SNG ANS 477 ff.; SNG Cop 727;, VF, weight 15.209 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, c. 342 - 338 B.C.; obverse ZEYΣEA − EY−ΘEPTOΣ, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios right; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, thunderbolt; on right, eagle with wings closed standing right; $290.00 (€217.50)

Aspendus, Pamphylia, 195 - 194 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

When this coin was struck, Antiochos III the Great had recovered central Asia Minor for the Seleukid Kingdom. Aspendos accepted Seleukid authority in 197 B.C. The city surrendered to Rome in 190 B.C.
SH59525. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2897, SNG Cop 771, Cohen DCA 312, VF, weight 16.722 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 195 - 194 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in roughly rectangular punch; reverse Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, AΣ / IH (year 18 Era of Aspendos) left; $290.00 (€217.50)

Macedonian Kingdom, Seleukos, Satrap in Babylon, 311 - 306 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Struck in the name of Alexander, this coin also bears the personal badge of Seleukos, an anchor. Seleukos was first appointed satrap in Babylonia in 320 B.C. but was put to flight by Antigonus in 315. He returned in 311 only to be forced to evacuate later that year by a counterattack by Antigonus' son, Demetrius. Not long after, however, Seleukos again recovered the city.
SH60135. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 293, Price 3449 (Marthus), Müller Alexander 1512, aVF/F, weight 16.601 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain mint, c. 311 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, anchor flukes up flanked by ∆ - I in left field, monogram under throne; $290.00 (€217.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60149. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Galatia 507, EF, weight 13.825 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome or Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in ex; double strike evident in obverse legend, minor flan crack, small encrustations, very sharp, handsome portrait and eagle; $285.00 (€213.75)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
SH60141. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 907a, Prieur 357, SNG Righetti 2027, SNG Cop -, EF, weight 10.949 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $280.00 (€210.00)

Macrianus, Summer 260 - Early Summer 261 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
SH57022. Silvered antoninianus, RSC IV 8, RIC V 6, SRCV III 10803, F, weight 3.441 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter seated left, patera in extended right, scepter in left, eagle at feet; rare; $270.00 (€202.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
RP59985. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 925, Prieur 355, EF, mint luster, weight 10.961 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $270.00 (€202.50)

Aspendus, Pamphylia, 188 - 187 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

At the time this coin was struck, the territory of Aspendos was surrounded by the Attalid's Pergamene Kingdom but retained independence.
SH59445. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2904, Müller Alexander 1217, Cohen DCA 312, gF, weight 15.885 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 188 - 187 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in a rectangluar punch; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle extended in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, wreath above AΣ / KE left (year 25 Era of Aspendos); $260.00 (€195.00)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Ptolemy IV's surname, Philopator, means father lover, ironic since according to some authorities he poisoned his father. Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria. He was a cruel and evil monarch.
SH59538. Bronze drachm, Svoronos 992; Weiser 60 (Ptolemy III, 247 - 243 B.C.); SNG Cop 205; SNG Milan 216, Noeske 147, Hosking 36, BMC Ptolemies p. 74, 71 (Ptolemy V), aVF, weight 73.463 g, maximum diameter 41.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs; a massive 73 gram Ptolemaic bronze!; $260.00 (€195.00)

Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 490 - 425 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Long used as a Hittite port, Sinope was re-founded as a Greek colony by Miletus in the 7th century B.C. Sinope flourished as the Black Sea port of a caravan route that led from the upper Euphrates valley. The city escaped Persian domination until the early 4th century B.C. In 183 B.C. it was captured by Pharnaces I and became the capital of the kingdom of Pontus. Lucullus conquered Sinope for Rome in 70 B.C., and Julius Caesar established a Roman colony there, Colonia Julia Felix, in 47 B.C. It remained with the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantines). It was a part of the Empire of Trebizond from the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204 until the capture of the city by the Seljuk Turks of Rûm in 1214.
GA70807. Silver drachm, SNG BM 1359, SNG Cop 272, SNG Stancomb 750, aVF, weight 6.069 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 90o, Sinope mint, c. 490 - 425 B.C.; obverse head of sea eagle left, dolphin below; reverse quadripartite incuse square with two opposing quarters filled, the others stippled and with pellet in inner corner; ex Harlan J. Berk, buy-or-bid sale, July 2010 ; $250.00 (€187.50)

Judaea (Yehudah), Ptolemaic Rule, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Ptolemy II requested copies of Jewish texts for the Library at Alexandria. There they were translated and transcribed by seventy Jewish scholars hired for the purpose, creating the Septuagint, the oldest Greek version of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). Many of the oldest Biblical verses among the Dead Sea Scrolls, particularly those in Aramaic, correspond more closely with the Septuagint than with the Hebrew text.
SH54977. Silver quarter-ma'ah-obol, Meshorer TJC 32; Mildenberg Yehud pl. 21, 24; Hendin 1087, gF, weight 0.192 g, maximum diameter 6.4 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem? mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right; reverse eagle standing half left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, Aramaic YHDH (Yehudah) on left; $240.00 (€180.00)



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Catalog current as of Friday, October 31, 2014.
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