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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Birds>Eagle PAGE 1/11«««1234»»»

Eagles on Ancient Coins


Kabyle, Thrace, c. 219 - 215 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo The obverse dies for this type were also used with reverse dies naming the Gaulish King Kavaros. Die wear shows the Alexanderine types followed Kavaros' coinage, indicating this type was likely struck during the revolt of the Thracians, which brought about the chieftain's death and the end of Gaulish rule. Kavaros ruled until at least 219 B.C., when he participated in a treaty between Byzantium and Bithynia. The style compares closely with contemporary issues of Dionysopolis, Mesembria, and Odessus.
SH69935. Silver tetradrachm, Price 882a, Draganov Cabyle 845 ff., Müller Alexander 399, VF, weight 16.205 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Cabyle mint, time of the Thracian Revolt, c. 219 - 215 B; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, Demeter standing facing torch in each hand; $420.00 (€365.40)

Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Acre, one of the oldest continuously inhabited sites in the world, is at the northern extremity of Haifa Bay in northern Israel. The city occupies an important location on the coast of the Mediterranean, linking to waterways and the commercial activity of the Levant.
SH69932. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3283, Newell Dated 35, Müller Alexander -, aVF, sculptural high relief, die break at eye, graffiti upper left on reverse, weight 17.019 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Ake mint, posthumous, c. 315 - 314 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, Phoenician numeral date (year 32) left below arm; $400.00 (€348.00)

Britannicus, Son of Claudius and Messalina, 12 February 41 - 11 February 55 A.D., Aeolis, Aegae
Click for a larger photo Tiberius Claudius Britannicus was born in 41 A.D., son of Cladius I and Messalina. Although the natural heir to the empire, Britannicus was passed over in favor of Nero who then had him murdered a year after his fathers' death.
SH54008. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2431 (4 specimens), SNG Cop -, Fair, weight 3.696 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aegae mint, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse BPETANNIKOC KAICAP, bare head of Britannicus right; reverse AIΓAEΩN EΠI XAΛEOY, Zeus standing left, head facing, eagle in right, long scepter behind in left; extremely rare; $390.00 (€339.30)

Macedonian Kingdom, Ptolemy I, as Satrap in Egypt, 323 - 305 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Ptolemy Lagides was a Macedonian general who, after Alexander's death, became the Satrap of Egypt under the nominal kings Philip III Arrhidaeus and the infant Alexander IV. By custom, kings in Macedonia asserted their right to the throne by burying their predecessor. Probably because he wanted to preempt Perdiccas, the imperial regent, from staking his claim in this way, Ptolemy took stole the body of Alexander. Ptolemy then openly joined the coalition against Perdiccas. Thus began the long series of wars between the Diadochi, Alexander's successors. In 305, Ptolemy took the titles king and pharaoh, founding the Ptolemaic Kingdom and Ptolemaic Dynasty.
GP72061. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 172 (as king); BMC Ptolemies p. 8, 62 (295 - 284, Cyprus); SNG Cop 36; SNG Milan 5; Malter 21; Weiser -; Noeske -, VF, crowded flan, red and brown patina, weight 4.503 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 315o, Alexandria mint, 310 - 305 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of deified Alexander the Great right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY (no title, upward on left), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings open, apluster above helmet on left; ex Harlan Berk; scarce; $370.00 (€321.90)

Syracuse, Sicily, Hiketas, 288 - 279 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Hicetas was tyrant of Syracuse for about nine years. The only recorded events during his rule are his victory over Phintias, tyrant of Agrigentum, and his defeat to the Carthaginians at the river Terias. He was expelled from Syracuse by Thynion shortly before Pyrrhus arrived in Sicily.
SH71041. Bronze AE 23, Calciati II p. 301, 154; BMC Sicily p. 204, 470; SNG ANS 782 ff.; SNG München 1307 corr.; SGCV I 1211; HGC 2 1448 (S); SNG Cop -, EF, beautiful style, tight flan, reverse slightly off-center, weight 9.962 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 225o, Syracuse mint, 288 - 279 B.C.; obverse ∆IOΣ EΛΛANIOY, beardless and laureate head of Zeus Hellanios left, no control symbol; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN (upward on left, undivided), eagle with wings open standing left atop fulmen, no control symbol, linear border; $350.00 (€304.50)

Kaunos, Ionia, c. 300 - 280 B.C., Civic Issue in the Name and Types of Alexander III The Great
Click for a larger photo See R.H.J. Ashton's article, "Kaunos, not Miletos or Mylasa," in NC 2004, pp. 33-46, for the reattribution to Kaunos.
GS72539. Silver tetradrachm, Ashton, NC 2004, pp. 33-46; Price 2074 (Miletus or Mylasa, Ionia), Müller Alexander 1128; SNG Cop -; SNG München -; SNG Alpha Bank -, gVF, light corrosion, marks, weight 16.135 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 0o, Kaunos mint, c. 300 - 280 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, double headed axe in left field; $350.00 (€304.50)

Aspendus, Pamphylia, 195 - 194 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

When this coin was struck, Antiochos III the Great had recovered central Asia Minor for the Seleukid Kingdom. Aspendos accepted Seleukid authority in 197 B.C. The city surrendered to Rome in 190 B.C.
SH59525. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2897, SNG Cop 771, Cohen DCA 312, VF, weight 16.722 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 195 - 194 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in roughly rectangular punch; reverse Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, AΣ / IH (year 18 Era of Aspendos) left; $290.00 (€252.30)

Macedonian Kingdom, Seleukos, Satrap in Babylon, 311 - 306 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Struck in the name of Alexander, this coin also bears the personal badge of Seleukos, an anchor. Seleukos was first appointed satrap in Babylonia in 320 B.C. but was put to flight by Antigonus in 315. He returned in 311 only to be forced to evacuate later that year by a counterattack by Antigonus' son, Demetrius. Not long after, however, Seleukos again recovered the city.
SH60135. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 293, Price 3449 (Marthus), Müller Alexander 1512, aVF/F, weight 16.601 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain mint, c. 311 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, anchor flukes up flanked by ∆ - I in left field, monogram under throne; $290.00 (€252.30)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60149. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Galatia 507, EF, weight 13.825 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome or Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in ex; double strike evident in obverse legend, minor flan crack, small encrustations, very sharp, handsome portrait and eagle; $285.00 (€247.95)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
SH60141. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 907a, Prieur 357, SNG Righetti 2027, SNG Cop -, EF, weight 10.949 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $280.00 (€243.60)

Macrianus, Summer 260 - Early Summer 261 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
SH57022. Silvered antoninianus, RSC IV 8, RIC V 6, SRCV III 10803, F, weight 3.441 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter seated left, patera in extended right, scepter in left, eagle at feet; rare; $270.00 (€234.90)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
RP59985. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 925, Prieur 355, EF, mint luster, weight 10.961 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $270.00 (€234.90)

Aspendus, Pamphylia, 188 - 187 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

At the time this coin was struck, the territory of Aspendos was surrounded by the Attalid's Pergamene Kingdom but retained independence.
SH59445. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2904, Müller Alexander 1217, Cohen DCA 312, gF, weight 15.885 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 188 - 187 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in a rectangluar punch; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle extended in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, wreath above AΣ / KE left (year 25 Era of Aspendos); $260.00 (€226.20)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Ptolemy IV's surname, Philopator, means father lover, ironic since according to some authorities he poisoned his father. Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria. He was a cruel and evil monarch.
SH59538. Bronze drachm, Svoronos 992; Weiser 60 (Ptolemy III, 247 - 243 B.C.); SNG Cop 205; SNG Milan 216, Noeske 147, Hosking 36, BMC Ptolemies p. 74, 71 (Ptolemy V), aVF, weight 73.463 g, maximum diameter 41.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs; a massive 73 gram Ptolemaic bronze!; $260.00 (€226.20)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nicopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior
Click for a larger photo Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP70821. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.1.53, Varbanov I 2465, Moushmov 980, cf. SNG Cop 268 (eagle left), BMC Thrace -, Choice EF, sharp, well centered, nice green patina, weight 2.161 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV Λ CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC, eagle standing right on thunderbolt,head left, wreath in beak; ex Heritage Auctions 231407, lot 64091, ex CNG auction 161 (28 Mar 2007), lot 125 ($206 plus fees); $250.00 (€217.50)

Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Raphanea, Seleukis Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo Josephus mentions Raphanea in connection with a stream that flowed only every seventh day (probably an intermittent spring now called Fuwar ed-Deir) and that was viewed by Titus on his way north from Berytus after the destruction of Jerusalem in 70. Near Emesa, Raphanea was the fortified headquarters of the Legio III Gallica from which in 218 A.D. 14-year-old Elagabalus launched his successful bid of to become Roman Emperor. The crusaders passed through it at the end of 1099; it was taken by Baldwin I and was given to the Count of Tripoli. It was then known as Rafania.
SH72144. Bronze AE 23, BMC Galatia p. 267, 3; SNG München 959 ff.; Lindgren I 2116; SNG Cop 385 var (radiate), gVF, the nicest of the type known to Forum, weight 7.038 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Raphanea mint, obverse AVT K ANTΩNINOC, radiate head right; reverse PEΦ−A−NE−ΩT, turreted Genius standing half left, wears himation, patera in right, cornucopia in left, bull at feet left, two eagles flanking in upper field; rare; $250.00 (€217.50)

Judaea (Yehudah), Ptolemaic Rule, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Ptolemy II requested copies of Jewish texts for the Library at Alexandria. There they were translated and transcribed by seventy Jewish scholars hired for the purpose, creating the Septuagint, the oldest Greek version of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). Many of the oldest Biblical verses among the Dead Sea Scrolls, particularly those in Aramaic, correspond more closely with the Septuagint than with the Hebrew text.
SH54977. Silver quarter-ma'ah-obol, Meshorer TJC 32; Mildenberg Yehud pl. 21, 24; Hendin 1087, gF, weight 0.192 g, maximum diameter 6.4 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem? mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right; reverse eagle standing half left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, Aramaic YHDH (Yehudah) on left; $240.00 (€208.80)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy Nios under Ptolemy II, 268 - 259 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Svoronos knew only the single BMC example. Very rare and missing from most collections.

Ptolemy Nios was the son of Lysimachos and Arsinoe II, as well as the step-son and co-ruler of Ptolemy II from 268 - 259 B.C. He was removed from his co-regency after he rebelled in 259 B.C., but remained as ruler of Telmessos in Lycia until after 240 B.C.
SH64051. Bronze dichalkon, Svoronos 792, pl. XXV, 22 (Ake-Ptolemais); BMC Ptolemies p. 65, 29 (Ptolemy IV, Ptolemais); Ashton Fethiye -; Weiser -; Noeske -; Hosking -, SNG Cop -, VF, weight 5.044 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Lycia, Telmessos mint, c. 260 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, tripod left, ΠTO right; very rare; $240.00 (€208.80)

Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great
Click for a larger photo Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
SH71607. Silver drachm, Price 1413, Müller Alexander 1676, SNG Berry 222, ADM II Series XII, gVF, toned, weight 4.117 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 315o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, ΓH monogram in left field, ME monogram under throne; $240.00 (€208.80)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Cleopatra VII originally shared power with her father Ptolemy XII and later with her brother-husbands Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV. Her relationship with Julius Caesar led to sole rule. After Caesar's assassination, she aligned with Mark Antony. Her reign marks the end of the Hellenistic Era and the beginning of the Roman Era. She was the last Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt.
GP73037. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 1871; Weiser 183; Noeske 380; SNG Cop 419; SNG Milan 428; BMC Ptolemies p. 123, 4 ; Hosking 166 (obol); Malter 284; SGCV II 7955, F, weight 16.645 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 51 - 30 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra right, with characteristic melon coif; reverse KΛEOΠATPAΣ BACIΛICCHC, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, cornucopia left, Π (80 drachms) right; $240.00 (€208.80)



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