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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Gods,Non-Olympian>Sol PAGE 1/3«««123»»»

Sol

Sol sometimes called Sol Invictus ("Unconquered Sun") was the solar deity in Ancient Roman religion. Worship of Sol began early but seems to have become more significant from the reign of Aurelian until the abolition of paganism under Theodosius I.


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.
Click for a larger photo The star in the field, a symbol of the sun-god, stands for the mint of Rome.
RS68509. Silver denarius, RIC IV 28, RSC III 154, SRCV II 7533, gVF, toned, weight 2.681 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 220 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P III COS III P P, Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left, star in left field; ex Antioch Associates (San Francisco); $165.00 (€123.75)

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 231, Severus Alexander accompanied his mother Julia Mamaea to Syria and campaigns against the Persians. Military command rested in the hands of his generals, but his presence gave additional weight to the empire's policy. The Romans were defeated and withdrew to Syria. After heavy losses on both sides, a truce was signed accepting the status quo. In 233, Alexander celebrated a triumph in Rome to commemorate his "victory."
RB63745. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 511, BMCRE VI 742, Cohen 413, gVF, nice patina, weight 19.982 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 231 A.D.; obverse IMP SEV ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder and back; reverse P M TR P X COS III P P, Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left; $150.00 (€112.50)

Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.
Click for a larger photo During Gordian's reign, the Roman Empire was threatened on multiple fronts. In 238, Goths from Ukraine crossed the Danube and devastated the Roman Empire up to the border with Anatolia. In 240, Africa revolted. Also in 240, Franks from northwest Germania raided the Rhine frontier. In 242, the cities of the Cimmerian Bosporus were evacuated because Goths controlled the territory.
RB65147. Bronze as, RIC IV 297a, Cohen 44, SRCV III 8773, VF, well centered, weight 10.483 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 4th issue, 241 - 243 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse AETERNITATI AVG S C, Sol standing slightly right, head left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left; $140.00 (€105.00)

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 234, the year this coin was struck, Alexander and his mother Julia Mamaea moved to Moguntiacum (Mainz), the capital of Germania Superior. His generals planned a military offensive and built a bridge across the Rhine. Alexander, however, preferred to negotiate for peace by buying off the Alemanni. This outraged legionaries who, on 18 March 235 murdered Alexander and his mother, ending the Severan Dynasty.
RB68910. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 538d, BMCRE 593, Cohen 449, SRCV 8004, gF, well centered on a tight flan, weight 15.532 g, maximum diameter 30.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 234 A.D.; obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P XIII COS III P P, Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left, S - C across fields; $125.00 (€93.75)

Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Oriens is Latin for "east." Literally it means "rising" from orior, "rise." The use of the word for "rising" to refer to the east (where the sun rises) has analogs from many languages: compare the terms "Levant" (French levant "rising"), "Anatolia" (Greek anatole), "mizrahi" in Hebrew (from "zriha" meaning sunrise), "sharq" in Arabic, and others. The Chinese pictograph for east is based on the sun rising behind a tree and "The Land of the Rising Sun" to refers to Japan. Also, many ancient temples, including the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, were built with their main entrances facing the East. To situate them in such a manner was to "orient" them in the proper direction. When something is facing the correct direction, it is said to have the proper "orientation."
RS67632. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8626, RIC IV 213, RSC IV 167, Choice aEF, weight 4.420 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 242 - 244 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ORIENS AVG, Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left; $120.00 (€90.00)

Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 277, Probus entered Rome to have his position as Emperor ratified by the Senate.
RB29519. Bronze antoninianus, RIC V 351 var (bust type), aVF, weight 3.197 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 277 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, radiate nude heroic bust left, aegis across shoulder and spear in right hand; reverse CONSERVAT AVG, Sol standing slightly right, radiate, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left, TXXT in exergue; very rare; $90.00 (€67.50)

Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Oriens is Latin for "east." Literally it means "rising" from orior, "rise." The use of the word for "rising" to refer to the east (where the sun rises) has analogs from many languages: compare the terms "Levant" (French levant "rising"), "Anatolia" (Greek anatole), "mizrahi" in Hebrew (from "zriha" meaning sunrise), "sharq" in Arabic, and others. The Chinese pictograph for east is based on the sun rising behind a tree and "The Land of the Rising Sun" to refers to Japan. Also, many ancient temples, including the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, were built with their main entrances facing the East. To situate them in such a manner was to "orient" them in the proper direction. When something is facing the correct direction, it is said to have the proper "orientation."
RS52118. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 63, VF, weight 4.558 g, maximum diameter 24.50 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 274 - 275 AD; obverse IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse ORIENS AVG, Sol standing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left, foot on captive left, captive right, officina number VI in right field, XXI* in ex; near full silvering remaining; $90.00 (€67.50)

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.
Click for a larger photo  
RB57197. Bronze sestertius, RIC IV 535, Cohen 441, VF, weight 20.229 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 233 A.D.; obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P XII COS III P P, Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left, S - C across fields; $90.00 (€67.50)

Roman Republic, C. Coelius Caldus, 51 B.C., Ancient Counterfeit
Click for a larger photo The Coelius Caldus depicted on the obverse served as Consul in 94 B.C.
RR65828. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. SRCV I 403, Crawford 437/1, RSC I Coelia 4-5 (official, Rome mint, 51 B.C.), F, bronze core, weight 3.181 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 330o, illegal mint, obverse C COEL CALDVS COS, bare head of Caldus right, voting tablet inscribed L D behind; reverse CALDVS III VIR, radiate head of Sol right, small shield before neck; $90.00 (€67.50)

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior
Click for a larger photo Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101 - 106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town reached its peak during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. Minted under the consular legate (governor) Aurelius Gallus.
RP68415. Bronze assarion, Varbanov 2986 (R5, same dies), H-H-J Nikopolis 8.18.27.1 corr. (R5), AMNG I/I 1492, BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, nice green patina, weight 2.988 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 225o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, as caesar, 195 - 198 A.D.; obverse M AY KA ANTΩNIN−OC, bare head right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC I, radiate head of Sol right, whip over shoulder; scarce; $80.00 (€60.00)



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Catalog current as of Wednesday, July 23, 2014.
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Sol