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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ MacedoniaView Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins of Macedonia

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Philip III Arrhidaeus, the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa, was Alexander the Great's half-brother. Alexander's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned him as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Incapable of actual rule, he was made king upon Alexander's death only to serve as a pawn for those who wished to grab power for themselves. Olympias had him imprisoned and then ordered his execution in 317 B.C.
SH72613. Gold stater, Price P90, ADM I 228 - 230, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, EF, lovely Hellenistic style, mint luster, weight 8.579 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with a coiled snake, wearing necklace and long drop earring; reverse ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ, Nike standing left, wreath in extended right hand, grounded stylis in left at her side, TI left, rose left under wing; ex Roma Numismatics auction 8, lot 470; $5220.00 SALE PRICE $4698.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus or Antigonus II Gonatus, 306 - 270 B.C.

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Unpublished in the standard references and not yet fully attributed, this is only the second specimen of this extremely rare and important drachm known to Forum. Both specimens were struck with the same reverse die. Gorny & Mosch wrote of their specimen: "Troxell recorded a very rare issue of Alexandrine tetradrachms in the name of Gonatas (The Peloponnesian Alexanders, ANSMN 17, 1971, 75-6, note 68), which through hoard evidence was conclusively proven to be struck at Pella circa 272 (see R. W. Mathisen, Antigonus Gonatas and the Silver Coinages of Macedon circa 280-270 BC, ANSMN 26, 1981, pp. 79-123, esp. p. 104). However, this unique drachm has no controls that would explicitly tie it to the Pella mint tetradrachms, and even more perplexing is the style of the engraving, which is clearly dissimilar to the tetradrachms as well. One might suppose that it is in fact not a coin of Gonatas at all, but rather a hitherto unknown drachm of his grandfather, Antigonos I Monophthalmos. However, this also does not sit well, again for reasons of style, which is inconsistent with the period of Monophthalmos' reign. For the time being, therefore, this coin must remain a numismatic enigma until further evidence can shed additional light on it."

There are two auction records for the Gorny & Mosch specimen: Roma Numismatics auction 7 (22 Mar 2014), lot 454, sold for £ 4,800 plus fees; and Gorny & Mosch auction 203 (5 Mar 2012), lot 150, sold for ? 3,200 plus fees. Our coin sold at Gitbud & Naumann auction 16, (4 May 2014), lot 152, apparently slipping through unnoticed by all but our astute consignor for ? 575 plus fees.
SH71048. Silver drachm, unpublished in standard refs; cf. Roma Numismatics auction 7, lot 454 (same rev die) = Gorny & Mosch auction 203, lot 150, VF, reverse struck a bit flat, weight 3.845 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Greece or Macedonia mint, 306 - 270 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Zeus Aetophoros enthroned left, throne with high back, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 16, lot 152; extremely rare, only two know specimens; $2500.00 SALE PRICE $2250.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus, c. 323 - 317 B.C.

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Arrhidaeus was the half-brother of Alexander the Great. Alexander's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned him as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Incapable of actual rule, he was made king upon Alexander's death only to serve as a pawn for those who wished to grab power for themselves. He was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia and in 317 B.C. was executed under orders of Olympias.
SH70941. Silver tetradrachm, Le Rider 507 (D270/R418), SNG ANS 441 (same dies), VF, fine style, deep punch obverse center, weight 14.218 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 45o, Pella mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse youth on horseback right, holding palm frond, bee right (control symbol) below; ex Classical Numismatic Group e-auction 233 (26 May 2010), lot 123; $950.00 SALE PRICE $855.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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This coin was struck under one of the Macedonian satraps in Babylon: Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I. Perdiccas suspected Archon of colluding in the theft of Alexander's corpse and, in 321 B.C., sent Dokimos to replace him. Archon was defeated and died from battle wounds. Seleucus, made satrap by Perdiccas rival Antipater, arrived in Babylon in October or November 320 B.C. and defeated Dokimos.
SH73195. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3697, Müller Alexander 1542, VF, weight 17.067 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 135o, Babylon mint, Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, radiate head of Helios facing on left, KY under throne; scarce; $700.00 SALE PRICE $630.00


Olynthos, Chalkidian League, Macedonia, 420 - 348 B.C.

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In 432 B.C. Olynthos broke away from Athens and, with several other cities, formed the Chalkidian league. In 393, Amyntas III of Macedonia temporally transferred territory to Olynthos when he was driven out of Macedonia by Illyrians. When he was restored and the league did not return his lands, he appealed to Sparta. Akanthos and Apollonia, also appealed to Sparta, claiming league membership was not voluntary but enforced at the point of a sword. After a long war, in 379 these cities were made "autonomous" subject allies of Sparta. Weakened by the division, the league was destroyed by Philip II of Macedon in 348 B.C.
SH64053. Silver tetrobol, Robinson-Clement group D, 38 (same dies); Traité pl. 313, 10; SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -; BMC Macedonia -, VF, weight 2.043 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Olynthos mint, c. 420 - 348 B.C.; obverse OΛYNΘ (counter-clockwise), laureate head of Apollo left; reverse XAΛKI∆EΩN, kithara with eight strings, squared legend around, all within a shallow incuse square; scarce; $310.00 SALE PRICE $279.00


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III, 238 - 244 A.D., Alexander and Bucephalus

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Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 B.C. Philonicus the Thessalian, a horse dealer, offered a massive wild stallion to Alexander's father, King Philip II. Since no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. Alexander, however, seeing that the horse was afraid of his own shadow, promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was given a chance and surprised all by subduing it. Alexander spoke soothingly to the horse and turned it towards the sun so that it could no longer see its shadow. Eventually Bucephalus allowed Alexander to ride him. Embarrassed, Philip commented "O my son, look thee out a kingdom equal to and worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee." Alexander named the horse Bucephalus because the horse's head seemed "as broad as a bull's." Bucephalus died of battle wounds in 326 B.C., in Alexander's last battle. Alexander founded the city of Bucephala (thought to be the modern town of Jhelum, Pakistan) in memory of his wonderful horse.
SH65202. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 724; cf BMC Macedonia p. 22, 102 (one neokorie); SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Bar -; SNG Saroglos -; Lindgren -, F, weight 10.822 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Beroea(?) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ, Alexander galloping left on his horse Bucephalus, about to spear a lion leaping left below; rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The obverse depicts Trajan as a military victor and probably copies an imperial statue. The reverse may depict a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
GB90406. Bronze AE 20, Lindgren II 978 (same dies), Varbanov 7179 (R7), AMNG III 79, Hunterian I 37, Moushmov 6068, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tüb, BMC Macedonia -, gF, centered, some porosity, weight 5.099 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, emperor on horseback galloping right, brandishing spear to strike a prostrate foe below; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pan is depicted in the pose of the life-size marble statue known as the Barberini Faun (Drunken Satyr) in the Glyptothek in Munich. A Faun is the Roman equivalent of a Greek Satyr. The position of the right arm over the head was a classical artistic convention indicating sleep. The statue is believed to have once adorned Hadrian's Mausoleum. The historian Procopius recorded that during the siege of Rome in 537 the defenders had hurled down upon the Goths the statues adorning Hadrian's Mausoleum. When discovered, the statue was heavily damaged; the right leg, parts of both hands, and parts of the head were missing. Johann Winckelmann speculated that the place of discovery and the statue's condition suggested that it had been such a projectile.Barberini Faun
RP66884. Bronze AE 26, cf. Varbanov III 3757 (R4), BMC Macedonia p. 95, 46; AMNG III 35; SNG Hunterian 660; SNG Cop 287 (bust obscure); SNG ANS 639 (laureate); Lindgren -, VF, weight 10.082 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 135o, Pella mint, obverse IMP C M ANT GORDIANVS, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL IVL AVS PGLLA (sic, error not in refs), Pan seated left, on a rock, right arm over head, left elbow resting on syrinx; ex Gorny & Mosch Giessener Münzhandlung auction 208, lot 1783; $195.00 SALE PRICE $176.00


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Kassandreia, Macedonia

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Cassandrea, previously Potidaea, was founded as a colony by Hortensius in 43 - 42 B.C. and refounded as COL IVL AVG CASSANDREN by Augustus in 30 B.C. The portrait and inscribed titles indicate this type was struck between 63 and 68 A.D. It may have been struck for Nero's visit to Greece in 66 - 67.
SH59952. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1517, SNG ANS 234, Varbanov 3324, SNG Cop -, VF, nice jade patina and attractive style, weight 8.108 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Kassandreia mint, 63 - 68 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P (IMP?) P P, radiate head left; reverse COL IVL AVG - CASSANDREN, horned head of Zeus Ammon left; $190.00 SALE PRICE $171.00


Thessalonica, Macedonia, Julius Caesar and Augustus, c. 28 - 27 B.C.

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Gaebler (AMNG, p. 125) believed the ∆ stands for 4 asses. Touratsoglou (p. 25) interprets it to indicate year four an era of beginning with the Battle of Actium, which would date the issue to 28 - 27 B.C.
RP90713. Leaded bronze AE 23, Touratsoglou 48 (V11/R44), RPC I 1554, Varbanov III 5153, SGICV 151, F, weight 10.222 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 28 - 27 B.C. (perhaps later); obverse ΘOEΣ, laureate head of Julius Caesar right; reverse ΘEΣΣAΛONIKEΩN, bare head of Augustus right, ∆ (year 4 of Augustus) below; $185.00 SALE PRICE $167.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was on the Via Egnatia, the principal Roman road which crossed the southern Balkans. In 50, the apostle Paul visited Amphipolis on his way to Thessaloniki. Many Christian churches were built indicating prosperity, but the region grew increasingly dangerous. In the 6th century the population had declined considerably and the old perimeter was no longer defensible against Slavic invasions. The lower city was plundered for materials to fortify the Acropolis. In the 7th century, a new wall was built, right through the bath and basilica, dividing the Acropolis. The remaining artisans moved to houses and workshops built in the unused cisterns of the upper city. In the 8th century, the last inhabitants probably abandoned the city and moved to nearby Chrysopolis (formerly Eion, once the port of Amphipolis).
SH58235. Bronze AE 25, SNG Evelpidis 1186, Varbanov III 3250 var (fish in ex, same obv die), BMC 118 var (same), SNG Cop 109 var (obv legend), SNG ANS 194 var (same, draped), VF, weight 8.849 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 225o, Amphipolis mint, obverse AYTOK M AYP KOMMO∆OC ANTON, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, City-goddess seated left on high-backed throne, polos on head, patera in exergue right; rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP59998. Bronze AE 25, Varbanov III 4709, BMC Macedonia p. 127, 133, SNG Cop -, VF, light scratches, weight 8.831 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, obverse AYK K M IOY ΦIΛIΠΠOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN ΠYΘIA, Apollo standing left, small Kabeiros in right, laurel branch in left, at his feet, agonistic urn containing a palm branch rests on a table; scarce; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C.

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Philip's reign was principally marked by an unsuccessful struggle against the emerging power of Rome. Philip was attractive and charismatic as a young man. A dashing and courageous warrior, he was inevitably compared to Alexander the Great and was nicknamed the darling of all Greece. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GB90418. Bronze AE 23, SNG München 1146 ff., SNG Alpha Bank 1071, Mamroth Bronze 229, SNG Cop -, F, weight 9.105 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonian mint, 221 - 179 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Athena standing left, brandishing javelin in right, shield in left, B − A (BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, King Alexander) flanking below arms, IΠ center right field, Φ - I (Philip) flanking at feet; scarce; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Mark Antony and Octavian, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates, MAPKOΣ ANTΩNIONΣ AYTOKPATΩP ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAP AYTOKPATΩP. The bust of Libertas on the obverse "refers to the grant of freedom by the Triumvirs to Thessalonica in 42 BC after the battle of Philippi (the victory which is celebrated on the reverse)." -- RPC I, p. 29
SH72307. Leaded bronze AE 31, BMC Macedonia p. 115, 63; RPC I 1551/20-26; Sear CRI 672; SNG Cop 374; SNG ANS 823, aVF, weight 17.561 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 37 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONKEΩN EΛEYΘEPIAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Eleutheria (Liberty) right, E (year 5) below chin; reverse M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT, Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right, palm frond in left; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
SH73070. Silver drachm, Price 1813, Müller Alexander 262, VF, porous, reverse a little flatly struck, weight 3.875 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 315o, Kolophon mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, crescent horns left in left field, Π under throne; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Paroreia, Macedonia, c. 185 - 168 B.C.

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The Macedonian kingdom was administered with a three-level pyramidal organization: on the top was the King and the nation, the kingdom was divided into districts, and within the districts were the civic organizations (cities and éthne). This civic coin was struck by the City of Paroreia during the years just prior to the Macedonian Kingdom's fall to Rome.
GB63726. Bronze AE 20, BMC Macedonia, p. 15, 61 (or similar); SNG Cop 255 (same), gVF, weight 9.344 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 225o, Paroreia mint, c. 185 - 168 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus Dodonaios right; reverse eagle standing right on thunderbolt, uncertain monogram or symbol upper right, ΠAP monogram right; $175.00 SALE PRICE $158.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaios, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck after Alexander the Great's death during the joint reign of Philip III, Alexander's brother, and the infant king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. Colophon also struck nearly identical drachms during this period in the name of Alexander IV.
GS74475. Silver drachm, Price P45, Müller Alexander P52, cf. SNG Alpha Bank 853 (A below throne), SNG Cop 1770 (Alexander IV), VF, nice style, nice toning, light marks, some die wear, weight 4.245 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon mint, struck under Menander or Kleitos, c. 322 - 319 B.C; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, long scepter vertical in left, lyre left, B below throne; rare; $150.00 (€130.50)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SH71663. Silver drachm, Price 2682; ADM I Sardes Series XX 399 ff., SNG München 641 var (monograms), SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, bold high-relief, centered, toned, light corrosion and encrustation, weight 4.080 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 45o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, as strategos of Asia, c. 319 - 315 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, K in a wreath left, monogram under throne; $165.00 SALE PRICE $149.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos travelled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna. He fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
RP66850. Bronze AE 25, SNG ANS 183, SNG Cop 104, BMC Macedonia -, VF, green patina, weight 8.475 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, obverse KAICAP ANTΩNINOC, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche seated left, wearing turreted crown, patera in right, center dimple; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C., Pseudo-Rhodian Coinage

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In "The Coinage of Rhodes 408 - c. 190 B.C." (Ashton Rhodes), Richard Ashton notes for this specific ΣTAΣIΩN type, "..I am certain (on the grounds of their find-spots, irregular die axes, crude style, and often low weights) [they] were imitations struck in northern or cetntral Greece during the Third Macedonian War." Perseus struck them to pay the 3,000 or more Cretan mercenaries in his army. Rhodian coinage, including locally struck imitatives, circulated in quantity on Crete and the type would have been preferred method of payment for Cretan mercenaries.
SH71318. Silver drachm, Ashton Mainland 35, SNG Cop 918 var (bud and grapes opposite), BMC Caria, p. 249, 207 var (same); SNG Keckman -, VF, weight 2.559 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, northern or central Greece mint, magistrate Stasion, c. 200 - 185 B.C.; obverse head of Helios facing slightly right; reverse ΣTAΣIΩN, rose, bud on tendril on left, bunch of grapes right; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Some blue-green patinas are quite fragile. This one is not.
GB69187. Bronze AE Unit, Price 395, SNG Alpha Bank 817, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, gVF, beautiful blue-green patina, light porosity, weight 5.970 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 17.7o, Macedonian mint, c. 325 - 310 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse VE monogram over club right above BAΣI, quiver left below; scarce; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Mende, Chalcidice, Macedon, c. 510 - 480 B.C.

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Mende was an ancient colony of Eretria, on the SW side of Cape Poseidion in Pallene. Its coins illustrate some forgotten myth of Dionysos, his companion Seilenos, and an ass. The wine of Mende was famous and is frequently mentioned by ancient writers. It is unlikely that Mende struck any coins after it was first captured by Philip in 358 B.C.
GA90295. Silver tritartemorion, AMNG III.2, 8; SNG ANS 307; SNG Berry 34, VF, porous surfaces, uneven tone, weight 0.292 g, maximum diameter 6.1 mm, die axis 0o, Mende mint, c. 510 - 480 B.C.; obverse head and neck of ass right; pellet at truncation; reverse mill-sail pattern incuse; ex CNG auction 249, lot 50; scarce; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Price 1756 is very similar, with a kerykeion (caduceus) vertical under the throne and a spear head in the right field. We don't see a spear head on this coin and it appears there is an obscure symbol, perhaps a monogram or thunderbolt, in the left field. This may be Price 1756 with spear head obscured and nothing left, or it may be an unpublished variety.
GS71590. Silver drachm, perhaps an unpublished variety; cf. Price 1756 (spear-head outer right), Müller Alexander 208 (same), Hersh -, VF, corrosion, small lamination defects, scratches, weight 3.605 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon mint, Menander or Kleitos, 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, vertical kerykeion under throne, uncertain symbol left(?); $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS71914. Silver drachm, Price 1983, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG München -, SNG Saroglos -, aVF, weight 3.628 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 225o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, c. 319 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, eagle in right, scepter in left, right leg drawn back, ∆ within wreath in left field, E under throne; very rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

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Struck by Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
GS71717. Silver drachm, Price 1412, Müller Alexander 1678, SNG Cop 1003, SNG München 461, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, nice style, toned, tight flan, a little porous, weight 4.102 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, ΓH monogram in left field, Θ under throne; struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.); $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 320 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SH72000. Silver drachm, Price 1827, Müller Alexander 273, Thompson-Bellinger Colophon 17, SNG Cop 911, SNG München 530, SNG Alpha Bank 619, VF, centered, toned, light scrape on obverse, some tiny pitting, weight 4.092 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Colophon mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, crescent horns left in left field, KPA monogram under throne; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


lot of 7 Roman Provincial Bronzes From Stobi, Macedonia, c. 3rd - 4th Century A.D.

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LT73694. Bronze Lot, 7 Roman Provincial Bronzes From Stobi, Macedonia, c. 3rd - 4th Century A.D., unattributed but probably all Severan Dynasty, coins in the photo are the actual coins you will receive, unattributed, 7 coins; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Neapolis, Macedonia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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While some examples of this hemiobol have an odd style gorgon, this example is of a style similar to Neapolis staters. Nevertheless, Klien's attribution of the type to Neapolis is less than certain.
GS68401. Silver hemiobol, Klein 154, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, Rosen -, Tzamalis -, VF, porosity, weight 0.345 g, maximum diameter 7.0 mm, die axis 270o, Macedonia, Neapolis mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse Gorgon; reverse Kantharos within a square incuse; very rare; $145.00 SALE PRICE $131.00


Olynthos, Macedonia, Chalcidian League, c. 360 - 348 B.C.

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At the temple of Apollo at Delphi, his priestesses, the Pythia, made their prophesies while sitting on a tripod.
GB48997. Bronze AE 15, SNG Cop 247 - 249, SNG ANS 561, VF, weight 1.936 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 90o, Olynthos mint, c. 360 - 348 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse XAΛKI−∆EΩN, tripod; rare; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00


Mende, Macedonia, 400 - 346 B.C.

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Mende was an ancient colony of Eretria, on the SW side of Cape Poseidion in Pallene. Its coins illustrate some forgotten myth of Dionysos, his companion Seilenos, and an ass. The wine of Mende was famous and is frequently mentioned by ancient writers. It is unlikely that Mende struck any coins after it was first captured by Philip in 358 B.C.
GB68715. Bronze chalkous, SNG Cop 221; SNG ANS 397 var (crescent above); BMC Macedonia p. 83, 13 var (no ivy branch), VF, weight 1.078 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 315o, Mende mint, 400 - 346 B.C.; obverse head of youthful Dionysos to left, wearing ivy wreath; reverse MEN, Amphora with tall handles, ivy branch left; scarce; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00


Thessalonica, Macedonia, Julius Caesar, and Augustus, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later)

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RPC tentatively dates the type to the reign of Augustus but notes it may have been struck as late as the reign of Domitian.
RP70490. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 1555; BMC Macedonia p. 115, 60; cf. SNG Cop 395 (Julius Caesar laureate); SGICV I 151 (same), F+, weight 8.287 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later); obverse ΘEOC, bare head of Julius Caesar right; reverse ΘECCAΛONI KEΩN, bare head of Augustus right; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Kassander, 319 - 297 B.C.

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Kassander was the son of Antipater and Regent for the young son of Alexander the Great. Notorious for his cruelty, in 311 B.C., he executed Alexander IV and his mother Roxana. We can date this coin, with the royal title BAΣIΛEΩΣ, to after 305 B.C. when he declared himself king.
GB90298. Bronze half unit, SNG Alpha Bank 937 ff. var, SNG Cop 1154 ff. var, SNG München 1020 ff. var, Lindgren I 1299 var, SNG Saroglos - (all var different controls), VF, well centered, green patina, weight 3.148 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 45o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KAΣΣAN∆EP BAΣIΛEΩΣ, lion left, breaking spear with mouth and foreleg, star above and below (control symbols), T (control letter) below head; this control symbol variant is unpublished in the references examined, ex Forum (2010); very rare; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS71657. Silver drachm, Price 1406, Müller Alexander 821, SNG Cop 988, SNG Alpha Bank 586, VF, toned, porous, weight 3.922 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, right leg drawn back, eagle in right, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left, KI left, ME under throne; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III, 238 - 244 A.D., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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For the Alexander commemorative series issued by the Koinon of Macedonia, AMNG is by far the best reference listing over 500 different varieties on 100 pages - an absolutely bewildering study. With few plate images and listing many minor variations, it is a challenge to use for anyone who does not speak German. Varbanov only lists coins of the Koinon with portraits of the emperor on the obverse.
RP75156. Bronze AE 26, cf. AMNG III 622; BMC Macedonia p. 24, 116; SNG Cop 1369, SNG Hunterian 742; SNG Bar 502; et al. (similar, but different rev leg arrangements, etc.), VF, very nice green patina, center dimples, weak legends, a few pits, weight 12.783 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 180o, Beroea(?) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ, Athena seated left, helmeted, Nike holding wreath in Athena's right hand, resting left hand on shield behind, rear leg of chair in the form of a lion's leg; unpublished variety(?); $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Chalkidian League, Olynthos, Macedonia, c. 432 - 348 B.C.

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In 432 B.C. Olynthos broke away from Athens and, with several other cities, formed the Chalkidian league. In 393, Amyntas III of Macedonia temporally transferred territory to Olynthos when he was driven out of Macedonia by Illyrians. When he was restored and the league did not return his lands, he appealed to Sparta. Akanthos and Apollonia, also appealed to Sparta, claiming league membership was not voluntary but enforced at the point of a sword. After a long war, in 379 these cities were made "autonomous" subject allies of Sparta. Weakened by the division, the league was destroyed by Philip II of Macedon in 348 B.C.
SH69954. Silver tetrobol, BMC Macedonia p. 68, 13; SNG ANS 537, SNG Cop 235; SNG Dreer 266, SNG Berry 22, aVF, grainy, scratches, weight 2.146 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 315o, Olynthos mint, c. 432 - 348 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, circle of dots around; reverse XAΛKIAEΩN (clockwise from upper left), kithara (lyre) with seven strings, all within incuse; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Neapolis, Macedonia, 424 - 350 B.C.

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Neapolis, Macedonia (Kavala, Greece today), was founded by settlers from Thasos near the end of the 7th century B.C., to exploit the rich gold and silver mines of the area. At the end of the 6th century B.C. Neapolis ("new city" in Greek) claimed its independence from Thasos and struck its own silver coins with the head of Gorgon. A member of the Athenian League, Neapolis was besieged by the allied armies of the Spartans and the Thasians in 411 B.C., during the Peloponnesian War, but remained faithful to Athens. The Apostle Paul landed at Neapolis on his second and third missionary journeys.
GS68653. Silver hemidrachm, SNG ANS 455 (same dies); SNG Cop 229; BMC Macedonia p.85, 25; SGCV I 1417, F/VF, grainy, open flan cracks, weight 1.804 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 225o, Macedonia, Neapolis mint, 424 - 350 B.C.; obverse Gorgoneion; reverse NEOΠ (downward on right), diademed female head right; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III, 238 - 244 A.D., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Simillar types with the club over lion reverse that identify only a single Neokorie in the reverse legend (no B) were struck under Severus Alexander, c. 231 - 238. Another similar issue is dated EOC, year 275 of the Actium Era (244 - 245 A.D.), on the reverse. They were probably struck for the visit of Philip I in 244.
RP59370. Bronze AE 27, AMNG III 741; BMC Macedonia p. 24, 118; SNG Cop 1375; SNG Bar 504; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Saroglos -; Lindgren -, aVF, weight 9.193 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 180o, Beroea(?) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ, lion walking right, club left above; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Macedonia, Roman Protectorate, c. 168 - 167 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus defeated the Macedonian King Perseus at the Battle of Pydna, and Macedonia came under Roman rule. This coin was struck shortly after Rome's victory, under the quaestor Gaius Publilius.
RP90404. Bronze AE 22, SNG Cop 1318; BMC Macedonia p 18, 72, aVF, weight 10.290 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 90o, 168 - 167 B.C.; obverse winged helmeted head of Roma (or Perseus) right, griffin at helmet peak; reverse MAKE∆ONΩN / TAMIOY ΓAIOY / ΠOΠΛIΛIOY, inscription in three lines within oak wreath; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP90685. Copper AE 21, RPC I 1651; Varbanov III 3229; SGICV 32; SNG Cop 305; AMNG III 14; BMC Macedonia p. 98, 23, VF, full inscriptions, toned bare copper, some light corrosion, weight 4.288 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse VIC - AVG, Victory standing left on base holding wreath and palm; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Thessalonika, Macedonia, c. 187 - 31 B.C.

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King Cassander of Macedonia founded Thessalonica in 315 B.C. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a half-sister of Alexander the Great. The Romans made Thessalonica the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia 168 B.C.
GB67765. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop 372, BMC Macedonia p. 111, 22; SNG ANS 798 var (incorrectly identified as Zeus, E above trident on obv), VF, weight 6.077 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 315o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 187 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Poseidon right, trident behind; reverse prow right, ΘEΣΣA/ΛONI above and below; $105.00 SALE PRICE $95.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.

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Perseus of Macedonia was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB68781. Bronze AE 19, SNG München 1274 ff., SNG Cop 1275, SNG Alpha Bank 1142 cor., SNG Dreer -, aVF, nice green patina, weight 5.247 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 179 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa across shoulder; reverse eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, B - A flanking above wings, Π−E flanking across lower field, stAR in exergue; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Severus Alexander, c. 231 A.D., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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According to Gaebler, pp. 20-21, these OMONOIA (harmony) coins apparently commemorated a settlement between the province of Macedonia and the free city of Thessalonica, which did not belong to the Macedonian koinon and was usually squabbling with it. Gaebler thinks that in 231 A.D., when Severus Alexander traveled through Macedonia on his way to Syria, Thessalonica and the koinon settled their differences and Thessalonica urged the emperor to allow the koinon to again issue coins with Beroia's title Neokoros, which is missing in this issue but reappeared in the next.
RP69770. Bronze AE 25, AMNG III 334, Lindgren -, BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, F, punch reverse center, weight 11.013 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 180o, Beroea(?) mint, 231 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN OMONOIA, Athena seated left, Cabeiros in right, spear vertical behind in left, rear leg of seat shaped like a lion's leg; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Thessalonica, Macedonia, c. 187 - 31 B.C.

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In 168 B.C. The Romans made Thessalonica the capital of the Macedonia Prima (First Macedonia) province, encompassing most of what had been the Kingdom of Macedonia.
GB90123. Bronze AE 17, cf. SNG ANS 771 (thunderbolt above), BMC Macedonia p. 112; 40 - 42 (controls), SNG Dreer 298 - 299 (same), Lindgren 1168 - 1170 (same), SNG Cop -, VF, nice green patina, well centered, weight 3.912 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, Macedonia; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse ΘEΣΣA−ΛO/NIKHΣ, horse galloping right, thunderbolt (control symbol) below; rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP90425. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1651; Varbanov III 3229; SGICV 32; SNG Cop 305; AMNG III 14; BMC Macedonia p. 98, 23, gVF, weight 3.776 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse VIC - AVG, Victory standing left on base holding wreath and palm; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander IV, 323 - 311 B.C.

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Struck after Alexander's death during the reigns of Alexander's infant son with Roxana and Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Olympias was Alexander the Great's mother and Alexander IV's grandmother, but not Philip III's mother. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C.
GB71731. Bronze AE 1/2 unit, Price 3157; AMNG III p.73, 5; Liampi Chronologie 230; SNG Cop 1127 var (monogram); SNG München -; SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, green patina, weight 4.265 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Salamis mint, c. 323 - 315 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield with five crescents around, Medusa facing at center; reverse crested Macedonian helmet, flanked by B - A (BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, King Alexander), spear head pointing up lower left, Σ monogram lower right; scarce; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II of Macedonia, 359 - 336 B.C.

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Philip II became the ruler of all Greece when he defeated the Athenians at the Battle of Chaeroneia in 338 B.C. Philip personally selected the design of his coins. His horse, on the reverse of this coin, won a race in the Olympic Games in 356 B.C., the year his son Alexander the Great was born.
GB74095. Bronze AE Unit, SNG ANS 940, SNG Cop 594, VF, well centered on a tight flan, small spots of corrosion, weight 6.075 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonian mint, c. 359 - 336 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right wearing taenia; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, young male riding horse prancing to right, N and trident head below; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III, 238 - 244 A.D., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Simillar types with the club over lion reverse that identify only a single Neokorie in the reverse legend (no B) were struck under Severus Alexander, c. 231 - 238. Another similar issue is dated EOC, year 275 of the Actium Era (244 - 245 A.D.), on the reverse. They were probably struck for the visit of Philip I in 244.
RP58833. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 741; BMC Macedonia p. 24, 118; SNG Cop 1375; SNG Bar 504; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Saroglos -; Lindgren -, aVF, rough, weight 10.578 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Beroea(?) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ, lion walking right, club left above; scarce; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Macedonian Kingdom, Demetrius I Poliorketes, 306 - 283 B.C.

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The B A on the reverse refers to BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, King Alexander (the Great). The Macedonian Kingdom continued to issue coinage in Alexander's name long after his death.

The prow refers to Demetrios' defeat of Menelaus, Ptolemy's brother, in the naval Battle of Salamis, completely destroying the naval power of Egypt.
GB66864. Bronze AE 15, Newell 163, SNG Cop 1185, SNG München 1056; SNG Alpha Bank 956, gVF, weight 2.847 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, Carian(?) mint, 290 - 283 B.C.; obverse Demetrios' head right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆HMHTPIOY, prow right, B A above, AP monogram below, double axe before; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Amphipolis, Macedonia, 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

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Amphipolis was built on a raised plateau overlooking the east bank of the river Strymon where it emerged from Lake Cercinitis, about 3 miles from the Aegean Sea. When Xerxes I of Persia crossed the Strymon during his invasion in 480 B.C. he buried alive nine young boys and nine maidens as a sacrifice to the river god.
RP69174. Bronze AE 25, AMNG III.2 p. 39, 63; Lindgren II 960; Mionnet Supplement III p. 26, 190; SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -; BMC Macedonia -; SGCV I -, Fair, weight 11.449 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 225o, Amphipolis mint, 1st - 3rd century A.D.; obverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, City goddess seated left on facing high-backed throne, radiate, shell(?) in right; reverse CTPYMΩN, river god Strymon reclining left on rocks, head turned right, broken reed in right, water plant in left; very rare; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Tiberius became Augustus' stepson when the emperor married Livia in 38 B.C. Augustus forced Tiberius to divorce the wife he loved and marry his daughter Julia. Tiberius hated his new wife and escaped her by going into exile at Rhodes in 6 B.C. After the deaths of the other possible successors, he was recalled in 2 A.D. and groomed to succeed Augustus, which he did on 19 August 14.
RP70927. Bronze AE 21, Touratsoglou 204 (V62/R181), RPC I 1565; BMC Macedonia p. 117, 74; SNG Cop 400, aF, weight 8.826 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 45o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, emission XI, c. 4 - 14 A.D.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONIKEΩN, laureate head of Augustus right; reverse TIBEPIOΣ KAIΣAP, bare head of Tiberius Caesar right; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50




  



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Macedonia Greek Coins