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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ MacedoniaView Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins of Macedonia

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II of Macedonia, 359 - 336 B.C.

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Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.
SH70337. Gold stater, Le Rider 341 (D152/R260), SNG ANS 154, Choice gVF, attractive style, perfect centering, light marks, weight 8.513 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 270o, Amphipolis mint, c. 340 - 328 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse charioteer in biga right, trident head below horses, ΦIΛIΠΠOY in exergue; $5500.00 (€4895.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus or Antigonus II Gonatus, 306 - 270 B.C.

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Unpublished in the standard references and not yet fully attributed, this is only the second specimen of this extremely rare and important drachm known to Forum. Both specimens were struck with the same reverse die. Gorny & Mosch wrote of their specimen: "Troxell recorded a very rare issue of Alexandrine tetradrachms in the name of Gonatas (The Peloponnesian Alexanders, ANSMN 17, 1971, 75-6, note 68), which through hoard evidence was conclusively proven to be struck at Pella circa 272 (see R. W. Mathisen, Antigonus Gonatas and the Silver Coinages of Macedon circa 280-270 BC, ANSMN 26, 1981, pp. 79-123, esp. p. 104). However, this unique drachm has no controls that would explicitly tie it to the Pella mint tetradrachms, and even more perplexing is the style of the engraving, which is clearly dissimilar to the tetradrachms as well. One might suppose that it is in fact not a coin of Gonatas at all, but rather a hitherto unknown drachm of his grandfather, Antigonos I Monophthalmos. However, this also does not sit well, again for reasons of style, which is inconsistent with the period of Monophthalmos' reign. For the time being, therefore, this coin must remain a numismatic enigma until further evidence can shed additional light on it."

There are two auction records for the Gorny & Mosch specimen: Roma Numismatics auction 7 (22 Mar 2014), lot 454, sold for £ 4,800 plus fees; and Gorny & Mosch auction 203 (5 Mar 2012), lot 150, sold for € 3,200 plus fees. Our coin sold at Gitbud & Naumann auction 16, (4 May 2014), lot 152, apparently slipping through unnoticed by all but our astute consignor for € 575 plus fees.
SH71048. Silver drachm, unpublished in standard refs; cf. Roma Numismatics auction 7, lot 454 (same rev die) = Gorny & Mosch auction 203, lot 150, VF, reverse struck a bit flat, weight 3.845 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Greece or Macedonia mint, 306 - 270 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Zeus Aetophoros enthroned left, throne with high back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 16, lot 152; extremely rare, only two know specimens; $2020.00 (€1797.80)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime issue

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Lifetime issue. This extremely rare type was probably struck in 323 B.C., just before Alexander's death. This type was unpublished prior to the 1993 Near East Hoard, there are no records of prior sales of the type on Coin Archives, and this is one of only four specimens of the type known to Forum.
SH75258. Silver tetradrachm, Hersh 5; Hersh Near East 4 - 5 (2 spec.); Troxell Studies p. 32, group E(?) or F(?) (3 examples known); Price -; Müller Alexander -; et al. -, VF, excellent centering, archaic style, uneven toning, light marks, weight 4.163 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, struck under Antipater, c. 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY (curving along dot border), Zeus enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, upright laurel branch on left; extremely rare; $850.00 (€756.50)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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This coin was struck under one of the Macedonian satraps in Babylon: Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I. Perdiccas suspected Archon of colluding in the theft of Alexander's corpse and, in 321 B.C., sent Dokimos to replace him. Archon was defeated and died from battle wounds. Seleucus, made satrap by Perdiccas rival Antipater, arrived in Babylon in October or November 320 B.C. and defeated Dokimos.
SH73195. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3697, Müller Alexander 1542, SNG Cop -, VF, weight 17.067 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 135o, Babylon mint, Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, radiate head of Helios facing on left, KY under throne; scarce; $600.00 (€534.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Kassander, as Regent, 317-305 B.C., or King, 305-297 B.C.

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When Antipater transferred the regency of Macedon to Polyperchon, Kassander rejected his father's decision, obtained support from Antigonus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, defeated Polyperchon, and in 317 B.C. declared himself Regent. After Olympias had Philip III assassinated later that year, Kassander besieged her in Pydna. The city fell two years later, Olympias was killed, and Alexander IV and Roxanne were imprisoned. To associate himself with the Argead dynasty Kassander married Alexander's half-sister, Thessalonica. About 310 B.C. he had Alexander IV and Roxanne poisoned. Kassander proclaimed himself King in 305 B.C. After Antigonus was killed at the Battle of Ipsus in 301 B.C., Kassander held undisputed rule of Macedonia. He had little time to savoir the fact, dying of dropsy in 297 B.C.
SH76104. Silver tetradrachm, SNG München 304, Price 441 var. (r. leg drawn back), SNG Cop 700 var. (same), SNG Alpha Bank 523 var. (different throne monogram), Choice VF, superb style, toned, bumps and marks, weight 16.974 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 90o, Amphipolis mint, c. 315 - 294 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg forward (lifetime style), Λover T over torch in left field, HΓ monogram under throne; $600.00 (€534.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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Struck during the lifetime of Alexander the Great or very soon after.
SH79674. Silver tetradrachm, Price 83, Müller Alexander 181, Troxell Issue E4, Demanhur Hoard 536 - 578, SNG Cop 673, Newell Reattribution 31, Wartenberg-Kagan 21, gVF, centered, toned, weight 17.156 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, Amphipolis(?) mint, struck under Antipater, c. 325 - 323/2 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, throne without back and two leg struts, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, TE monogram lower left, concave field; Obolos (by Nomos) auction 3, lot 120; ex a Swiss collection formed prior to 2005; $520.00 (€462.80)


Macedonia, Roman Rule, Quaestor Aesillas, 90 - 75 B.C.

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This type was apparently intended to encourage Macedonian pride by portraying the legendary national hero of the Macedonians, and at the same time clearly communicate Roman authority with name and symbols of the Roman quaestor.
SH77214. Silver tetradrachm, Bauslaugh Group VIII, O90/R328; SNG Ashmolean 3305; AMNG III 224; SNG Cop 1330; SGCV I 1439, VF, rose toning, crowded flan, die wear, weight 16.397 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 90 - 75 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right with horn of Ammon and flowing hair, Θ behind, MAKE∆ONΩN below; reverse AESILLAS above money-chest (cista), club, and Q over quaestor's chair (sella curulis), all within laurel wreath, pellet on chest handle, pellet at center of wreath knot, pellet at end of Q; $500.00 (€445.00)


Macedonia, Roman Rule, Quaestor Aesillas, 90 - 75 B.C.

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This type was apparently intended to encourage Macedonian pride by portraying the legendary national hero of the Macedonians, and at the same time clearly communicate Roman authority with name and symbols of the Roman quaestor.
SH77215. Silver tetradrachm, Bauslaugh Group VI, AMNG III 223; SNG Cop 1330; SNG Ashmolean 3305; SGCV I 1439, VF, nice style, light toning, die wear, weight 14.921 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 90 - 75 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right with horn of Ammon and flowing hair, Θ behind, MAKE∆ONΩN below; reverse AESILLAS above money-chest (cista), club, and Q over quaestor's chair (sella curulis), all within laurel wreath, pellet at end of Q; $500.00 (€445.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

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Philip II coin types remained prominent in the northern regions of the Macedonian Kingdom long after his death. This coin was struck after Alexander's death when the kingdom was nominally ruled by Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother Philip III Arrhidaeus, son of Philip II and Philinna, and Alexander IV, the great conqueror's young son. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only used them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C.
GS75190. Silver tetradrachm, Le Rider 507/503 var. (D270/R414, unlisted die combination), SNG ANS 441, SNG Berry 111, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, fine style, toned, some horn silver, obverse slightly off center, weight 13.952 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 270o, Pella mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠ−OY, youth on horseback right, holding palm frond, bee right (control symbol) below; struck under Antipater, Polyperchon, or Kassander; $400.00 (€356.00)


Macedonia, Roman Rule, Quaestor Aesillas, 90 - 75 B.C.

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This type was apparently intended to encourage Macedonian pride by portraying the legendary national hero of the Macedonians, and at the same time clearly communicate Roman authority with name and symbols of the Roman quaestor.
RS77035. Silver tetradrachm, Bauslaugh Group VI, SNG Lockett 1543, SNG Cop 1330, SNG Ashmolean 3305, AMNG III 223, SGCV I 1439, VF, toned, porous, light deposits of copper saltss, weight 11.862 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 90 - 75 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right with horn of Ammon and flowing hair, Θ behind, MAKE∆ONΩN below; reverse AESILLAS above money-chest (cista), club, and Q over quaestor's chair (sella curulis), all within laurel wreath, pellet below sella, pellet at end of Q; $400.00 (€356.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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According to Dr. Prokopov this Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" imitative were struck by Roman authorities, mainly in Macedonia but perhaps also by mobile military mints on campaigns, c. 148 - 80 B.C. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
SH77588. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVIII, 1651 (O FF3 / R 1320); SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, centered on a tight flan, light toning, light marks, weight 16.835 g, maximum diameter 29.8 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTIHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN (sic, HP engraving error - I and HP ligate), Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left on hip, MH monogram inner left; $350.00 (€311.50)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SH79282. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Price 2646 ff., ADM I 368, gVF, excellent style, well struck on a tight flan, obverse off center, light marks and corrosion, weight 16.729 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 90o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, as strategos of Asia, 318 - 315 B.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, Γ left, A under throne; nothing (Price 2646), a star (Price 2647), or an ivy leaf (Price 2649A) in exergue; Naville Numismatics Ltd., auction 18, lot 29; $320.00 (€284.80)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79630. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 743 (O AC8 / R 592); SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, toned, bumps and marks, die wear, weight 16.745 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left on hip, MH monogram inner left; $300.00 (€267.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79631. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 834 (O AF4 / R 462); SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, high relief convex obverse, concave reverse, toned, centered on a tight flan, die wear, scratches and marks, weight 16.949 g, maximum diameter 32.7 mm, die axis 315o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left on hip, MH monogram inner left; $300.00 (€267.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79632. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XIV, monogram 24, cf. 1100 - 1104 (V CD3 / -); SNG Cop 1046, VF, centered, toned, struck with a worn obverse die, scrape on chin, scratches and marks, weight 16.690 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left on hip, monogram inner left; $300.00 (€267.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79633. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, 1226 (O DD4 / R 989); SNG Cop 1040 ff., aVF, nice style Herakles, some marks, small edge crack, weight 16.560 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left on hip, MH monogram inner left; $300.00 (€267.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79635. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, 1226 (O DD4 / R 989); SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, nice style, light toning, bumps and scratches, die wear, weight 16.787 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left on hip, MH monogram inner left; $300.00 (€267.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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This reverse copies a type issued for Augustus. The statue of Julius Caesar is often described as crowning Augustus, but it seems clear on most specimens that both Augustus and Caesar are just raising their right hands in a salute. RPC identifies the figure behind as Genius Populi Romani(?), undoubtedly because the figure wears only a himation around his hips and legs. On the coin issued by Augustus, Caesar wears a toga.
RP83547. Bronze AE 26, RPC Online IV 4259 (4 spec., same dies as L 1958-3-4-92); AMNG III.2 p. 103, 18, pl. XX, 17 (rev. only); SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; BMC Macedonia -, VF, green patina, obverse a little off center, marks and scratches, corrosion, weight 10.650 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi mint, 177 - 192 A.D.; obverse M COMMO ANT P FELIX AV BR, laureate head of Commodus right; reverse COL IVLIA AVG PHILIP, a statue of Augustus, on left, standing left in military dress and statue of Divi Julius Caesar (or Genius Populi Romani?) standing left behind him a himation around hips and legs, both raising right hand in salute, both statues on base inscribed DIVS (sic) / AVG in two lines; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 36, lot 338; very rare; $300.00 (€267.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79634. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 806 - 808 var. (O AE8 / R -); SNG Cop 1040 ff., F, centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, die wear, weight 16.664 g, maximum diameter 32.2 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left on hip, MH monogram inner left; $270.00 (€240.30)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Most people expect the crests on ancient helmets to strictly run from front to back. Officer's helmets, however, frequently had a crest running from ear to ear, as on the helmet used as a control symbol on the reverse of this coin. The two ear flaps dangle below the bowl and visor of the helmet.
SH75314. Silver tetradrachm, Meydancikkale 618 (same obv. die); Mathisen, Administrative VI.1, obv. die A1; Price 629; Müller Alexander 233; SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, centered, golden toning, test cut, light scratches and marks, lamination defect on reverse, weight 16.793 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 90o, Pella (or Amphipolis?) mint, c. 275 - 270 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing on left, ΠAP monogram under seat strut, KE monogram in exergue; ex CNG auction 349, lot 35; $250.00 (€222.50)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III & Alexander IV - Ptolemy Keraunos, c. 323 - 280 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Struck posthumously in the name of Alexander the Great. Born a leader, his genius and charisma led the Macedonian army to create an empire covering most of the then-known world, from Greece to India. Alexander's reign begins the Hellenistic Age, a time when civilization flourished. He was regarded as god and his fame grew even greater after his premature death at thirty-two.
GS75177. Silver drachm, Price 2798A, Haymana Hoard 449, Müller Alexander -, gVF, some porosity, slight double strike on reverse, weight 4.414 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Anatolian mint, 323 - 280 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, dolphin swimming downward (control symbol) on left, H (control letter) under throne; ex Pecunem Gitbud & Naumann auction 26 (14 Dec 2014), lot 110; extremely rare; $250.00 (€222.50)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS75273. Silver drachm, Price 1797, Müller Alexander 1322, SNG Cop 931, SNG München 517, SNG Alpha Bank 611, Prokesch-Osten I 326, Thompson-Bellinger Colophon 12, aEF, nice style, slight porosity, some light bumps and marks, weight 4.153 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long lotus topped scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, N left; $250.00 (€222.50)


Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Mygdones or Krestones, c. 480 - 470 B.C.

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Previously attributed to Aigai, Macedonia, Cathy Lorber has reattributed these coins as tribal issues from an area west or southwest of Bisaltia, probably inhabited by the Mygdones or Krestones.
CE83467. Silver diobol, SNG ANS 60 (Aigai, same dies); SNG Berry 11 (same); SNG Cop 30 (Aigai); AMNG III 15 (Aigai); Lorber Goats 15, VF, well centered, etched surfaces, weight 1.017 g, maximum diameter 10.7 mm, die axis 180o, tribal mint, issue 2, c. 480 - 470 B.C.; obverse male goat half-kneeling right, head turned left, pellets around; reverse quadripartite incuse square; $250.00 (€222.50)


Olynthos, Chalkidian League, Macedonia, 420 - 348 B.C.

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In 432 B.C. Olynthos broke away from Athens and, with several other cities, formed the Chalkidian league. In 393, Amyntas III of Macedonia temporally transferred territory to Olynthos when he was driven out of Macedonia by Illyrians. When he was restored and the league did not return his lands, he appealed to Sparta. Akanthos and Apollonia, also appealed to Sparta, claiming league membership was not voluntary but enforced at the point of a sword. After a long war, in 379 these cities were made "autonomous" subject allies of Sparta. Weakened by the division, the league was destroyed by Philip II of Macedon in 348 B.C.
SH64053. Silver tetrobol, Robinson-Clement group D, 38 (same dies); Traité pl. 313, 10; SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -; BMC Macedonia -, VF, weight 2.043 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Olynthos mint, c. 420 - 348 B.C.; obverse OΛYNΘ (counter-clockwise), laureate head of Apollo left; reverse XAΛKI∆EΩN, kithara with eight strings, squared legend around, all within a shallow incuse square; scarce; $240.00 (€213.60)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck by Menander, the satrap of Lydia, 331 - 321 B.C. or by Kleitos (Cleitus the White), the satrap of Lydia, 321 - 318 B.C., in the name of Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Philip and Alexander's infant son Alexander IV were made joint kings by Alexander's generals, who really only intended to use them as pawns. Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias, Alexander's mother, to ensure the succession of her grandson.
RS77030. Silver drachm, Price P106, ADM I Series XV, VF, nice style, toned, reverse slightly double struck, light marks, weight 4.276 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, Menander or Kleitos, c. 322 - 318 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, rose left, monogram under throne; $225.00 (€200.25)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SH75320. Silver drachm, Price P43, Müller Alexander P50, SNG München 938, aEF, some die wear, weight 4.238 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon mint, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, lyre left; ex Forum (2005); $200.00 (€178.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS75252. Silver drachm, ADM II Series XIV, Price 1528, Müller Alexander 1618, SNG Cop 995, SNG München 476, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, toned, full circle obverse, light marks and scratches, weight 4.140 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos(?) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, MI monogram left, Z (appearing as I) under throne; $200.00 (€178.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
GS75259. Silver drachm, Price P26, SNG Cop 1099, SNG München 937, Müller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, well centered and struck, fine style, toned, light marks, weight 4.229 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydus(?) mint, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at the neck; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, MH monogram left, horse's leg under throne; $200.00 (€178.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS76130. Silver drachm, Price 1560; ADM II, Series XIX, 375; Müller Alexander 252; SNG Cop 972; SNG Berry 158; SNG München 486, gVF, dark toning, weight 4.163 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos(?) mint, c. 303 - 302 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ME monogram left, ivy leaf under throne; $200.00 (€178.00)


Eion, Macedonia, c. 470 - 460 B.C.

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Published examples of this type are about twice the weight of this coin and identified as diobols and trihemiobols. Our coin might be an underweight diobol or trihemiobol, but the weight is closer to an obol.

Eion was only about 3 miles from Amphipolis and after the 5th century was merely a seaport of its large neighbor. The denomination is either a diobol or trihemiobol. The significance of the obverse type is not clear, but presumably makes reference to the characteristic fauna of the region at that time.
GA79647. Silver obol, cf. SNG ANS 275; McClean 3084; BMC Macedonia p. 75, 21; AMNG III/2, p. 140, 37 (diobols and trihemiobols), VF, etched surfaces, weight 0.664 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, Eion mint, c. 470 - 460 B.C.; obverse goose standing right, on decorated base, left leg raised, head turned back, lizard left above, Θ lower left; reverse rough mill sail incuse pattern; $200.00 (€178.00)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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RPC notes, the mature portrait indicates this type was struck in the second half of Augustus' reign.
RP83474. Bronze AE 24, RPC I 1650, SNG Cop 283, SNG ANS 683, McClean 3269, Grant FITA 275, F, nice portrait, weight 11.562 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi mint, c. 9 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse COL AVG IVL PHILIVSSV, laureate head of Augustus right; reverse AVG DIVI F upward on left, DIVO IVL upward on left, three bases, on the larger middle base, a statue of Augustus, on left, standing left in military dress and statue of Divi Julius Caesar standing left behind him wearing a toga, both raising right hand in salute; $200.00 (€178.00)


Mark Antony and Octavian, 2nd Triumvirate, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The obverse and reverse legends combined indicate this coin celebrates the Homonoia between Thessalonica and Rome which was established by the triumvirs.

In 37 B.C., Cleopatra lent Antony the money for the army. After a five-month siege the Romans took Jerusalem from the Parthians. Herod the Great made king by Anthony, took control of his capital. Antigonus was taken to Antioch where Antony had him executed. Thousands of Jews were slaughtered by the Roman troops supporting Herod.
GB83519. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 1553; BMC Macedonia p. 113, 43; SNG ANS 806; SNG Cop 378; AMNG III/2, p. 121, 24; McClean 3772, F, green patina, corrosion, flan crack, weight 6.561 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 37 B.C.; obverse OMONOIA, veiled bust of Homonoia right, wearing stephane; reverse horse galloping right, ΘEΣ/ΣAΛON in two lines above, PΩM below; scarce; $200.00 (€178.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck shortly after Alexander the Great's death during the joint reign of Philip III, Alexander's brother, and the infant king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. Sardes also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but the Alexander named on this coin was more likely the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV.
GS75248. Silver drachm, ADM I, series XV, 320b (same dies); Price 2631; Müller Alexander 517; SNG Alpha Bank 645; SNG München -; SNG Cop -, SNG Berry -, VF, attractive style, toned, tight flan, weight 4.175 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 319 - 318 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, bee head right on left, A with dot within below throne; rare; $185.00 (€164.65)


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III, 238 - 244 A.D., Alexander and Bucephalus

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Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 B.C. Philonicus the Thessalian, a horse dealer, offered a massive wild stallion to Alexander's father, King Philip II. Since no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. Alexander, however, seeing that the horse was afraid of his own shadow, promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was given a chance and surprised all by subduing it. Alexander spoke soothingly to the horse and turned it towards the sun so that it could no longer see its shadow. Eventually Bucephalus allowed Alexander to ride him. Embarrassed, Philip commented "O my son, look thee out a kingdom equal to and worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee." Alexander named the horse Bucephalus because the horse's head seemed "as broad as a bull's." Bucephalus died of battle wounds in 326 B.C., in Alexander's last battle. Alexander founded the city of Bucephala (thought to be the modern town of Jhelum, Pakistan) in memory of his wonderful horse.
SH65202. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 724; cf BMC Macedonia p. 22, 102 (one neokorie); SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Bar -; SNG Saroglos -; Lindgren -, F, weight 10.822 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ, Alexander galloping left on his horse Bucephalus, about to spear a lion leaping left below; rare; $180.00 (€160.20)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The obverse depicts Trajan as a military victor and probably copies an imperial statue. The reverse may depict a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
GB90406. Bronze AE 20, Lindgren II 978 (same dies), Varbanov 7179 (R7), AMNG III 79, Hunterian I 37, Moushmov 6068, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tüb, BMC Macedonia -, gF, centered, some porosity, weight 5.099 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, emperor on horseback galloping right, brandishing spear to strike a prostrate foe below; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; rare; $180.00 (€160.20)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS75184. Silver drachm, ADM II Series XIV, Price 1528, Müller Alexander 1618, SNG Cop 995, SNG München 476, SNG Berry 227, SNG Fitzwilliam 2244, McClean 3499, VF, light mark, die wear, weight 4.223 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos(?) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, MI monogram left, Z (appearing as I) under throne; $180.00 (€160.20)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RB79934. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov III 3735 (R4), SNG ANS 633, Moushmov 6479, SNG Cop -, F, superb portrait, attractive green patina, tight flan, weight 11.112 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, city-goddess seated left, kalathos on head, right hand raised to shoulder; $180.00 (€160.20)


Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.

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Perseus of Macedonia was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB83486. Bronze AE 19, cf. SNG Alpha Bank 1142, SNG Cop 1275, SNG Dreer 628, SNG München -, VF, green patina, weight 5.227 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 179 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa right; reverse eagle standing facing on thunderbolt, wings open, head right, B − A flanking head above wings, Π-E flanking across lower field outside wings, star in exergue; $180.00 (€160.20)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 320 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
GS75260. Silver drachm, cf. Price 1789 ff., Müller Alexander 1603 ff., SNG Cop 917 f., SNG München 513 ff. (all with various symbols under throne), VF, nice style, well centered on a crowded flan, light marks and scratches, small areas of encrustation, weight 4.235 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Colophon mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, SW monogram left, uncertain symbol under throne(?); $175.00 (€155.75)


Eion, Macedonia, c. 500 - 437 B.C.

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Eion was only about three miles from Amphipolis and from the late 5th century onwards served merely as a seaport of its much larger neighbor. The denomination is variously described as a diobol or trihemiobol. The significance of the obverse type is not clear, but presumably makes reference to the characteristic fauna of the region at that time.
GA77599. Silver trihemiobol, SNG ANS 280 - 283, SNG Cop 180 corr., SNG Berry 29, Klein 151, BMC Macedonia p. 75, 21, aVF, well centered, light toning, edge split, porous, weight 0.661 g, maximum diameter 11.5 mm, Eion mint, c. 500 - 437 B.C.; obverse goose standing right, looking back, lizard above; reverse quadripartite incuse square; $175.00 (€155.75)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and the Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
GS75247. Silver drachm, Price 1995, Müller Alexander 788, SNG Cop 999, Thompson-Bellinger Magnesia 27, SNG München 568, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, well centered, toned, struck with a worn obverse die, porous, weight 3.968 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long lotus tipped scepter vertical behind in left hand, AN monogram over E in left field, AY monogram under throne; $170.00 (€151.30)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Struck by Kleitos (Cleitus the White), satrap of Lydia, 321 - 318 B.C., under Perdiccas as regent for Philip III, Alexander's brother, and the infant king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. Sardes also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but the Alexander named on this coin was more likely the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV.
GS77132. Silver drachm, Price 2600; ADM I Series XIII, 191 ff.; SNG München 634; SNG Cop -; SNG Alpha Bank -; Müller Alexander -, VF, attractive style, toned, porous, weight 4.063 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 321 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg forward, feet on footstool, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long lotus tipped scepter vertical behind in left hand, EYE monogram left, torch under throne; $170.00 (€151.30)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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With the arrival of Alexander the Great, Teos gained its freedom from Persian rule. In 319 B.C., it came under the rule of the Strategos of Asia, Antigonus I Monophthalmos (the one-eyed). Antigonus declared himself King in 306. In 302 B.C., Troas fell to Lysimachus' general, Prepelaos. Lysimachus moved some of Troas' citizens to the newly built city of Ephesus.
GS77149. Silver drachm, Price 2282, SNG Oxford 2803, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, SNG Alpha Bank -, Müller Alexander -, VF, toned, well centered, light bumps and marks, porosity, weight 3.974 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Teos mint, c. 310 - 302 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, griffin seated left on left, ΛΩΠ monogram below throne strut; very rare; $170.00 (€151.30)


Thessalonica, Macedonia, 88 - 31 B.C.

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King Cassander of Macedonia founded Thessalonica in 315 B.C. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a half-sister of Alexander the Great. The Romans made Thessalonica the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia 168 B.C.
GB79940. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 19, pl. 23, 9; SNG ANS 804; SNG Cop 369; BMC Macedonia p. 112, 35, F, green patina, weight 11.809 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 88 - 31 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I above; reverse two Centaurs prancing, back to back, each with cloak flying behind and holding a branch, ΘEΣΣAΛO/NIKHΣ in two lines in exergue; $170.00 (€151.30)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus won the decisive Battle of Pydna. Perseus of Macedonia was made prisoner and the Third Macedonian War ended. Paullus executed 500 Macedonians, exiled many more to Italy and confiscated their belongings in the name of Rome but according to Plutarch, keeping too much to himself. On the return to Rome in 167 BC, his legions were displeased with their share of the plunder. To keep them happy, Paullus stopped in Epirus, a kingdom suspected of sympathizing with Macedonia; 70 towns were sacked, 150,000 people enslaved and the region was left to bankruptcy. Paullus' return to Rome was glorious. With the immense plunder collected in Macedonia and Epirus, he celebrated a spectacular triumph, featuring the captured king of Macedonia himself. The senate awarded him the cognomen Macedonicus.
GB83472. Bronze AE 19, BMC Macedonia p. 48, 40 - 41; AMNG III 51; SNG Cop -; SNG Evelpidis -, Nice VF, attractive style, nice green patina, weight 5.610 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; obverse ivy-wreathed head of Dionysos right; reverse goat standing right, AMΦIΠO/ΛEITΩN in two lines, starting above, ending in exergue; scarce; $170.00 (€151.30)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV - Kassander, c. 323 - 310 B.C.

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Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by King Eurystheus (his cousin), was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt, but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
GB76151. Bronze AE 20, Price 2800f, SNG München 919, Müller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Cop -, VF, nice green patina, light marks, light corrosion, weight 5.612 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Western Anatolia mint, c. 323 - 310 B.C., Possibly Struck by Antigonus I; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in lion-skin head-dress; reverse torch and club left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward in center, bow inside bow case right, A lower right, uncertain round countermark; $165.00 (€146.85)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was on the Via Egnatia, the principal Roman road which crossed the southern Balkans. In 50, the apostle Paul visited Amphipolis on his way to Thessaloniki. Many Christian churches were built indicating prosperity, but the region grew increasingly dangerous. In the 6th century the population had declined considerably and the old perimeter was no longer defensible against Slavic invasions. The lower city was plundered for materials to fortify the Acropolis. In the 7th century, a new wall was built, right through the bath and basilica, dividing the Acropolis. The remaining artisans moved to houses and workshops built in the unused cisterns of the upper city. In the 8th century, the last inhabitants probably abandoned the city and moved to nearby Chrysopolis (formerly Eion, once the port of Amphipolis).
SH58235. Bronze AE 25, SNG Evelpidis 1186, Varbanov III 3250 var. (fish in ex., same obv. die), BMC 118 var. (same), SNG Cop 109 var. (legend), SNG ANS 194 var. (same, etc.), VF, weight 8.849 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 225o, Amphipolis mint, obverse AYTOK M AYP KOMMO∆OC ANTON, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, City-goddess seated left on high-backed throne, polos on head, patera in extended right; rare; $160.00 (€142.40)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP59998. Bronze AE 25, Varbanov III 4709, BMC Macedonia p. 127, 133, SNG Cop -, VF, light scratches, weight 8.831 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, obverse AYK K M IOY ΦIΛIΠΠOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN ΠYΘIA, Apollo standing left, small Kabeiros in right, laurel branch in left, at his feet, agonistic urn containing a palm branch rests on a table; scarce; $160.00 (€142.40)


Mark Antony and Octavian, 2nd Triumvirate, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates, MAPKOΣ ANTΩNIONΣ AYTOKPATΩP ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAP AYTOKPATΩP. The bust of Libertas on the obverse "refers to the grant of freedom by the Triumvirs to Thessalonica in 42 BC after the battle of Philippi (the victory which is celebrated on the reverse)." -- RPC I, p. 29

In 37 B.C., Cleopatra lent Antony the money for the army. After a five-month siege the Romans took Jerusalem from the Parthians. Herod the Great made king by Anthony, took control of his capital. Antigonus was taken to Antioch where Antony had him executed. Thousands of Jews were slaughtered by the Roman troops supporting Herod.
SH72307. Bronze AE 29, BMC Macedonia p. 115, 63; RPC I 1551/20-26; Sear CRI 672; SNG Cop 374; SNG ANS 823, aVF, weight 17.561 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 37 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONKEΩN EΛEYΘEPIAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Eleutheria (Liberty) right, E (year 5) below chin; reverse M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT, Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right, palm frond in left; $160.00 (€142.40)


Macedonia, Roman Protectorate, Quaestor Gaius Publilius, 168 - 167 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus won the Battle of Pydna, ending the Third Macedonian War. According to Plutarch, Paullus kept too much plunder for himself, displeasing his legions. On his return to Rome, to keep them happy, Paullus stopped in Epirus, a kingdom suspected of sympathizing with Macedonia. He sacked 70 towns, enslaved 150,000, and left the region bankrupt. Paullus' return to Rome was glorious. With the immense plunder, he celebrated a spectacular triumph, featuring the captured king, Perseus of Macedonia. The senate awarded him the cognomen Macedonicus.
RP77182. Bronze AE 19, BMC Macedonia p. 18, 76; SNG Cop 1323; AMNG III 210, MacKay pl. III, 5 var. (noted variant); Lindgren 1350 var. (monograms), VF, well centered on a tight flan, small deposits, small spots of light corrosion, weight 11.140 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Bottiaea, Pella(?) mint, 168 - 167 B.C.; obverse head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing crested Athenian helmet adorned with a griffin and foreparts of horses (as on contemporary Athenian tetradrachms); reverse ΓAIOY / TAMIOY, cow grazing right, ΠΛY (ΠOΠΛIΛIOY) monogram above right, BT (Bottiaea) monogram below; scarce; $160.00 (€142.40)




  



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Macedonia Greek Coins