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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ North Africa ▸ CarthageView Options:  |  |  | 

Carthage

Carthage, located in North Africa on the Gulf of Tunis, established a hegemony over other Phoenician settlements throughout the Mediterranean, North Africa and what is now Spain. Carthage was in a constant state of struggle with the Roman Republic, which led to a series of conflicts known as the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city of Carthage, the annexation by Rome of all remaining Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire population of Carthage.Carthagian Empire Map


Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal

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Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB72290. Bronze AE 17, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646; SNG Cop 613 var. (divided ethnic); BMC Italy p. 131, 12 var. (same), VF, green patina, weight 3.570 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 225o, Arpi (near Foggia, Italy) mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse APΠANOY (upward on left), bunch of grapes; rare; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00
 


Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal

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Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB73614. Bronze AE 20, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646; SNG Cop 613; BMC Italy p. 131, 12, F, weight 3.792 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 270o, Arpi (near Foggia, Italy) mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse APΠANOY, bunch of grapes; rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00
 


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

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Overstruck on an earlier Siculo-Punic bronze, with head of Tanit / horse with palm behind. The male image lacks signs of a deity and may be one of the leaders of the Punic forces.
GB65846. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 121 (also overstruck on type SNG Cop 109 - 119), VF, overstruck, weight 2.576 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 315o, West Sicilian mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; obverse youthful male head left between two stalks of grain; undertype: head of Tanit left; reverse horse galloping to right; undertype: horse standing right, palm tree behind in background; rare; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00
 


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 241 - 221 B.C.

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Carthage, a Phoenician city-state on the Gulf of Tunis in North Africa, was once a major hub of trade and dominated the western Mediterranean. Conflict with the Sicilian Greeks and the Roman Republic led to recurring war. In 146 B.C., after the third and final Punic War, Carthage was destroyed and occupied by Rome.
GB76848. Bronze shekel, Apparently unpublished control variant; Viola CNP 224, Müller Afrique 175, SNG Ashmolean 269, Alexandropoulos 63 (only ayin, bet & het listed), aVF, green patina, scratches, potentially active corrosion (appears stabilized), weight 4.303 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 90o, Carthage mint, c. 310 - 290 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit-Kore left wearing wreath of grain, wearing earring with one pendant, and pendant necklace, dot border; reverse horse standing right with all four hooves on exergue line, long caduceus on far side of horse at center, Punic control letter alef right, dot border; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50
 


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Early 3rd Century B.C.

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Agathocles, the tyrant of Syracuse, died in 289 B.C. He restored the Syracusan democracy on his death bed, stating that he did not want his sons to succeed him as king. The following year, some of his disbanded mercenaries, calling themselves Mamertines (Sons of Mars), seized Messana in northeast Sicily. The city became a base from which they ravaged the Sicilian countryside. Syracuse was weakened by his loss and Carthage began a renewal of their power in Sicily.
GB76852. Bronze AE 17, Viola CNP 94, Alexandropoulos 22, HGC 2 1674 (S), Müller Afrique 315, Weber III 8486, SNG Cop VIII 126, SGCV II 6530, BMC Sicily -, F, well centered, green patina, areas of corrosion, weight 3.626 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 90o, Carthage or uncertain Sicilian mint, early 3rd century B.C.; obverse date palm tree with two bunches of hanging fruit, no legend, symbols or monogram; reverse unbridled horse standing right, head turned back looking left, no legend, symbols or monogram; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00
 


Siculo-Punic, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

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Before it was incoporated within the Persian Empire in the 370s B.C., Tyre was the economic and political hub of the Phoenician world. Supremacy passed to Sidon, and then to Carthage, before Tyre's destruction by Alexander the Great in 332 B.C. Each colony paid tribute to either Tyre or Sidon, but neither had actual control. The Carthaginians, however, appointed their own magistrates to rule the towns and took much direct control. This policy would result in a number of Iberian towns siding with the Romans during the Punic Wars.
GB65641. Bronze half unit, Viola CNP 126, SNG Cop VIII 96 ff. (=SNG Cop I 1022 ff.), SNG München 1626 ff., SNG Morcom 897, Alexandropoulos 15, aVF, rough, nice green patina, weight 5.015 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 270o, Carthage or Sicilian mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; obverse male head left, wreathed in grain, wearing hoop earring; reverse free horse prancing right, short exergual line below rear hooves, linear border; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50
 


Carthage, Zeugitana, 201 - 175 B.C.

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In 195, a Spanish revolt against Roman consolidation of the ex-Carthaginian colonies was put down by Marcus Porcius Cato ("the Censor"). He avoided one defeat by paying the Celtiberians 200 talents (around 120,000 denarii), a much-criticised tactic. On Cato's return to Rome, Aemilius Paulus succeeded him as Roman governor in Spain.
GB73373. Bronze trishekel, SNG Cop 409 ff. (various symbols), aF, porous, flan flaw, weight 17.254 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, 201 - 175 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain; reverse horse striding right, Punic letter(?) below; large 28mm bronze; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00
 


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 200 - 146 B.C.

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At its height, Carthage's influence extended over most of the western Mediterranean. Continual war with the Sicilian Greeks, and then Rome, ended with the complete destruction of the city, annexation by Rome of all Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire population of the city in 146 B.C.
GI90317. Bronze trishekel, Viola CNP 63g; Müller Afrique 244; SNG Cop 412; Alexandropoulos MAA 105i, F, weight 18.051 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 315o, Carthage mint, c. 200 - 146 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, long hair, wreathed in grain, earring with one pendant; reverse horse striding right, Punic letter bet above pellet below; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; rare ; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50
 


Sardinia, Punic Rule, 241 - 238 B.C.

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After the Roman fleet decisively defeated the Carthaginian fleet in 241 B.C., ending the First Punic War, Carthage was forced to agree to abandon all claims on Sicily, to refrain from sailing warships in Italian waters, and to pay an indemnity of 3,200 talents. In 238 B.C., Rome declared war on Carthage demanding control of Sardinia. To avoid war, Carthage abandoned Sardinia.
GB65898. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop I 1106; SNG Cop VII 252; Lindgren II 645 - 646, F, pitted, crude style, weight 3.748 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 225o, Sardinian mint, c. 264 - 241 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit wreathed in barley left; reverse three barley stalks, pellet in crescent with horns downward above; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00
 







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REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Tuesday, May 31, 2016.
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Carthage