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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ North Africa ▸ CarthageView Options:  |  |  | 

Carthage

Carthage, located in North Africa on the Gulf of Tunis, established a hegemony over other Phoenician settlements throughout the Mediterranean, North Africa and what is now Spain. Carthage was in a constant state of struggle with the Roman Republic, which led to a series of conflicts known as the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city of Carthage, the annexation by Rome of all remaining Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire population of Carthage.Carthagian Empire Map


Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal

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Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB72290. Bronze AE 17, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646; SNG Cop 613 var. (divided ethnic); BMC Italy p. 131, 12 var. (same), VF, green patina, weight 3.570 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 225o, Arpi (near Foggia, Italy) mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse APΠANOY (upward on left), bunch of grapes; rare; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal

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Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB73614. Bronze AE 20, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646; SNG Cop 613; BMC Italy p. 131, 12, F, weight 3.792 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 270o, Arpi (near Foggia, Italy) mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse APΠANOY, bunch of grapes; rare; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Early 3rd Century B.C.

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Agathocles, the tyrant of Syracuse, died in 289 B.C. He restored the Syracusan democracy on his death bed, stating that he did not want his sons to succeed him as king. The following year, some of his disbanded mercenaries, calling themselves Mamertines (Sons of Mars), seized Messana in northeast Sicily. The city became a base from which they ravaged the Sicilian countryside. Syracuse was weakened by his loss and Carthage began a renewal of their power in Sicily.
GB76852. Bronze AE 17, Viola CNP 94, Alexandropoulos 22, HGC 2 1674 (S), Müller Afrique 315, Weber III 8486, SNG Cop VIII 126, SGCV II 6530, BMC Sicily -, F, well centered, green patina, areas of corrosion, weight 3.626 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 90o, Carthage or uncertain Sicilian mint, early 3rd century B.C.; obverse date palm tree with two bunches of hanging fruit, no legend, symbols or monogram; reverse unbridled horse standing right, head turned back looking left, no legend, symbols or monogram; scarce; $70.00 (€62.30)
 


Carthago Nova, Punic Iberia, c. 237 - 209 B.C.

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After Carthage's defeat in the First Punic War, Hamilcar set out to improve his family's and Carthage's fortunes by subjugation of the Iberian Peninsula. According to Livy, Hannibal later said that he begged his father to take him to Iberia, his father agreed but demanded that he first swear that as long as he lived he would never be a friend of Rome. When Hamilcar drowned in battle, Hannibal's brother-in-law Hasdrubal succeeded to his command of the army with Hannibal an officer under him. When Hasdrubal was assassinated in 221 B.C., Hannibal was proclaimed commander-in-chief by the army and confirmed by the Carthaginian government. In 218, Hannibal began the Second Punic War against Rome. Year after year, Hannibal won battle after battle, including completely destroying two Roman armies in 212 B.C. However, by 209 B.C. it was becoming increasingly clear that Fabius' strategy was working for Rome and winning battles would not win the war for Carthage.
GB84875. Bronze 1/5 Unit, Villaronga-Benages 582 (R1), Burgos 521, Villaronga MHC 114, SNG BM Spain 67, F, dark patina, rough, scratches, corrosion, broad irregular flan, weight 2.213 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, c. 237 - 209 B.C.; obverse wreathed head of Tanit left; reverse crested Corinthian helmet left with earflaps; rare; $65.00 (€57.85)
 







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REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Friday, August 18, 2017.
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Carthage