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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Olympians ▸ Ares or MarsView Options:  |  |  |   

Ares or Mars

God of war and bloodshed. Symbols include the boar and the spear. Son of Zeus and Hera.


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

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This type with this obverse legend arrangement is apparently unpublished. The normal obverse legend arrangement is A VITELLLIVS IMP upward on left and GERMANICVS downward on right. Another variation has this legend break but the obverse legend ends with GERMAN. The arrangement on this coin does not leave enough room for either the final S or the globe at the point of the bust and they appear to be merged. This variation is likely an engraving error for one or the other normal types.
RS72989. Silver denarius, RIC I 6 (R) var. (obv. leg. break), RSC II 26a, BMCRE I 85 var. (same), BnF III 8 var. (GERMAN), Hunter I 53 var. (same), SRCV I 2190 var. (same), VF, toned, porous, a few marks, insignificant flan cracks, weight 3.325 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Tarraco mint, c. Jan - Jul 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS - IMP GERMANICVS, laureate head left, small globe at point of bust; reverse CONSENSVS EXERCITVVM, Mars advancing left, nude but for crested helmet and cloak tied in belt at waist and flying behind, spear in right, aquila with vexillum in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, an unpublished variant of a rare type, this is the only example known to Forum; $1080.00 (961.20)


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

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RS72966. Silver denarius, Unpublished; cf. RIC I 64 (aureus), F, centered on tight flan, porous, extensive but mostly light corrosion, weight 2.969 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Gaul, Lugdunum mint, Mar - July 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS GER IMP AVG P MAX TR P, laureate head right, globe at point of bust; reverse CONSENSVS EXERCITVVM, Mars advancing left, nude but for crested helmet and cloak tied in belt flying behind, spear in right, aquila with vexillum in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; extremely rare, this is the only example known to Forum and to experts consulted, unique(?), these legends and types known only as an aureus (RIC 64); $450.00 (400.50)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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The as is a rare denomination for Septimius Severus.
SH66874. Copper as, RIC IV 683, BMCRE V 527A, Cohen IV 313 (4 Fr), VF, weight 11.298 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 194 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP IIII, laureate head right; reverse MARS PATER, Mars walking right, nude but for helmet and cloak over shoulder flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of captured arms in left over shoulder; very rare; $225.00 (200.25)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

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RIC lists this type as common, but that is certainly an error. This is the first example we have handled and there are very few examples online.
RS90472. Silver denarius, RSC III 166b, RIC IV 248 (C), BMCRE VI 803, SRCV II 7883, Choice VF, toned a few small coppery spots, weight 2.741 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 232 A.D.; obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped, cuirassed, bust right; reverse MARS VLTOR, Mars standing left, leaning on shield and holding spear; standard resting on his right arm; rare; $215.00 (191.35)


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

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On 8 October 314, at the Battle of Cibalae, Constantine defeated Licinius near Colonia Aurelia Cibalae (modern Vinkovci, Croatia). Licinius was forced to flee to Sirmium, and lost all of the Balkans except for Thrace. The two Augusti initiated peace negotiations, but they failed and they would not make peace until 1 March 317.
RL76327. Billon follis, Unlisted bust variety of a very rare type; RIC VII Ticinum 4 (R4) var. (head), SRCV IV 15258 var. (same), Cohen VII 139, Hunter V -, VF, well centered, light contact marks and corrosion, weight 3.147 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from front; reverse MARTI CONSERVATORI, Mars standing right, helmeted, in military dress, reversed spear in right hand, left hand resting on grounded shield, PT in exergue; $175.00 (155.75)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D., Struck by Aureolus

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This coin was struck in the name of Postumus by Aureolus (one of the so-called Thirty Tyrants) while Gallienus held him under siege in Milan. Ancient sources which refer to Aureolus are limited and contradictory. He may have made his own bid for the Purple after Gallienus was murdered and Postumus failed to take advantage of the turmoil in Italy. The new emperor Claudius soon brought his rebellion to an end.
RA76384. Billon antoninianus, RIC V 388, RSC IV 441, Mairat 222 - 227, Schulzki AGK 111b, Elmer 614, Cunetio 2485 - 2488, SRCV III 11001, gVF, attractive portrait, well centered on a tight flan, weight 3.560 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 135o, 3rd officina, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 3rd emission, mid 268 A.D.; obverse IMP POSTVMVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS EQVIT, Virtus (or Mars) walking right, wearing helmet and military garb, cloak flying behind, transverse spear in right, shield in left, T in exergue (off flan); from the Scott Collection; $170.00 (151.30)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 120 - 63 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77170. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 153; SNG BM 1162 corr. (monograms); Stancomb 680 var. (monogram); BMC Pontus p. 17, 48 ff. var. (monograms); SNG SNGvA 64 var. (same), VF, tight flan, flan adjustment marks, weight 7.960 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 120 - 63 B.C.; obverse head of Ares right in crested helmet; reverse sword in sheath with strap to right, AMI−ΣOY divided across field, star within crescent with horns up upper left, monograms upper right, lower left and lower right; $150.00 (133.50)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 120 - 63 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77171. Bronze AE 19, SNG BM 1161; SNGvA 64; BMC Pontus p. 17, 48; SNG Stancomb 679 var. (monograms); SNG Cop 154 ff. var. (same); SGCV II 3643, VF, tight flan, coarse green patina, weight 8.417 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 120 - 63 B.C.; obverse head of Ares right in crested helmet; reverse sword in sheath with strap, AMI−ΣOY divided across field, star within crescent with horns up upper left, IB upper right, monograms lower left and right; $150.00 (133.50)


Sillyon, Pamphylia, 3rd Century B.C.

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Sillyon was a relatively unimportant city but a significant fortress. According to one legend, it was founded as a colony from Argos; another holds that it was founded, along with Side and Aspendos, by the seers Mopsos, Calchas and Amphilochus after the Trojan War. Sillyon is first mentioned in c. 500 BC by Pseudo-Scylax. From 469 B.C., it became part of the Athenian-led Delian League. It is mentioned in the Athenian tribute lists from c. 450 B.C. and again in 425 B.C., and then disappears again from the historical record until 333 B.C., when Alexander the Great unsuccessfully besieged it. It was well-fortified and had a strong garrison of mercenaries and "native barbarians," so Alexander, pressed for time, abandoned the siege after the first attempt at storming it failed. The city was extensively rebuilt under the Seleucids, especially its theater. Later, when most of western Asia Minor was subject to the Kingdom of Pergamon, Sillyon remained a free city by a decision of the Roman Senate.
GB73951. Bronze AE 16, BMC Lycia p. 165, 1; Lindgren-Kovacs 1178; SNG BnF 952; SNGvA 4567 var. (star over thunderbolt left), SNG Cop -, VF, weight 2.745 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Sillyon mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Ares right, wearing crested helmet; reverse ΣEΛYNIYΣ, Apollo(?) standing left, nude, right hand extended, rolled chlamys in left, thunderbolt in left field; rare; $145.00 (129.05)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, 241 - 235 B.C.

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In 235 B.C. in Rome, the consul Titus Manlius Torquatus presided over the first ever closing of the gates of the Temple of Janus, signifying peace.
RR72276. Bronze litra, Crawford 25/3, Sydenham 26, BMCRR Romano-Campanian 64, HN Italy 299, SNG Cop 204, F, rough, tight flan, weight 2.789 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 45o, Rome(?) mint, 241 - 235 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of beardless Mars right; reverse bridled horse's head right, sickle behind, ROMA below; scarce; $140.00 (124.60)




  



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Catalog current as of Thursday, August 25, 2016.
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Ares or Mars