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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Greek Imperial ▸ Decapolis, Arabia & SyriaView Options:  |  |  |     

Roman Provincial Coins from the Decapolis, Syria and Arabia

The Decapolis means "the ten cities" in Greek, yet we don't really know how many cities there were, or where they were. In 106 A.D., under the emperor Trajan, the Nabataean Kingdom and the cities of the Decapolis were incorporated into the newly established Provinces of Syria and Arabia.

Click here to read "The Decapolis of Jordan" by Rami G. Khouri


Tetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Lysanias, 40 - 36 B.C.

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Lysanias is called Tetrarch of Abila by Josephus. Lysanias' father Ptolemaios was married to Alexandra, one of the sisters of Mattathias Antigonus. Lysanias offered the Parthian satrap Barzapharnes a thousand talents and 500 women to depose Hyrcanus and put his uncle (or step-uncle) Antigonus on the throne of Judaea (Josephus B.J. 1.248). When Lysanias continued to support Antigonus against the Roman nominee Herod the Great, Mark Antony had him executed, and gave his territory to Cleopatra VII.
GB67917. Bronze AE 21, Herman 11.g, RPC I 4769, HGC 9 145 corr., Lindgren III 1243, BMC Galatia -, VF, weight 5.480 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libano mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse veiled female bust right, no inscription; reverse double cornucopia, flanked by four ligatures ΛYCA, TETP, APX, IΦ (Lysanias tetrarch and high priest); very rare; $215.00 (€189.20)
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

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Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis.
RS77327. Silver drachm, Metcalf Tell Kalak 15; SNG ANS 1155; Sydenham Cappadocia 184 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 54, 62 var.(Caesarea, no drapery); SNG Cop -, VF, well centered on a tight flan cutting off parts of legends, toned, light marks, slight porosity, weight 3.300 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, 112 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ Iς YΠAT ς (regnal year 16, COS 6), Arabia standing facing, head left, branch in right, bundle of cinnamon sticks in left, camel left in background on left; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Uncertain Mint, Anatolia or Syria

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The mint, the quaestor who struck this type, and even the identity of the person in the portrait remain uncertain. The type has previously been attributed to Macedonia and the portrait identified as Brutus (Friedlander) or Caesar (Grant). David Sear notes the type has never been found in Macedonia. Finds point to Syria or Anatolia. It is possible that the type was issued, with his own portrait, by Sosius, a general under Marc Antony who was quaestor in 39 B.C. Much more likely, however, the portrait is of Augustus.
RP77502. Bronze AE 28, RPC I 5409; Sear CRI 957 (Syria); AMNG II 29 (Pella), F, porous, scratches, weight 19.349 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Anatolian or Syrian mint, obverse bare head right; reverse hasta (spear), sella quaestoria (quaestor's seat of office), and fiscus (imperial treasury), Q (for quaestor) below; ex H.D. Rauch e-auction 15 (16 Jun 2014), lot 145; $175.00 (€154.00)
 


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Gadara, Decapolis

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Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan), located on a mountain summit about 6 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee, was the capital of the Roman province Peraea. The local era of Gadara (Pompeian) began in 64 B.C. Mark (5:1) and Luke (8:26-39) describe the miracle healing of a demoniac (Matthew [8:28-34] says two demoniacs) in the country of the Gadarenes.
RP72124. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 4819, Spijkerman 19, SNG ANS -, VF, weight 4.412 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan) mint, 50 - 51 A.D.; obverse CEBACTWI KAICAPI, laureate head right; reverse ΓA∆APA, turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right, date L∆IP ( year 114); $170.00 (€149.60)
 


Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes V (Herodian Tigranes I), c. 6 - 12 A.D.

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"The reign of Tigranes V has generally been described as uneventful; his coins are similarly unremarkable. They do not commemorate any historical or military events but merely copy designs common to the Seleucid and autonomous city coinage of Mesopotamia, Syria, and Phoenicia. The standing Herakles/Vahagn, which was employed extensively by Tigranes the Great (CCA, 99-103), would have had particular appeal for the Phoenician population, as well as the Armenian." -- Frank L. Kovacs in "Tigranes IV, V, and VI: New Attributions"
SH66377. Bronze chalkous, Kovacs AJN 20 10, Bedoukian CCA 156 (Tigranes IV), Nercessian ACV 166 (same, half chalkous), VF, weight 2.467 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus(?) mint, c. 6 - 12 A.D.; obverse heavily bearded head of Tigranes IV right, wearing Armenian tiara; reverse BAΣIΛEΩC TIΓPANOY MEΓAΛOY, eagle standing left, wings closed; rare; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Zeugma, Commagene, Syria

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Butcher notes coins of Elagabalus from Zeugma share obverse dies with his coins from Antioch and were probably struck at the Antioch mint.

Zeugma was founded by Seleucus I Nicator who almost certainly named the city Seleucia after himself. In 64 B.C. the city was conquered by Rome and renamed Zeugma, meaning "bridge of boats." On the Silk Road connecting Antioch to China, Zeugma had a pontoon bridge across the Euphrates, which was the long time border with the Persian Empire. The Legio IV Scythica was camped in Zeugma. The legion and the trade station brought great wealth to Zeugma until, in 256, Zeugma was fully destroyed by the Sassanid king, Shapur I. An earthquake then buried the city beneath rubble. The city never regained its earlier prosperity and, after Arab raids in the 5th and 6th centuries, it was abandoned again.
RY90698. Bronze AE 32, BMC Galatia p. 127, 28; Butcher 29; SNG Cop 31 var.(AVT K M AV -..., and slight drapery), F, weight 18.971 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 315o, Antioch(?) mint, obverse AVT KAI MAP AVP - ANTΩNEINOC CE, laureate head right; reverse ZEYΓM−ATEΩN (Z reversed), tetrastyle temple of Zeus(?) with peribolos containing grove of trees, capricorn right in exergue; big 32 mm bronze!; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Beroea, Cyrrhestica, Syria

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Aleppo is called Halab in Hittite documents of the second millennium B.C. The city opened its gates to Alexander after the Battle of Issus. Seleucus built a new city nearby and named it Beroea. Saint Paul records that his preaching at Beroea was a great success. The city was sacked by the Persians in 540, and captured by the Muslims without a fight in 637.
RY75674. Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 892; Bellinger 85; cf. BMC Galatia p. 132, 19 - 20 (bust from front); SNG Righetti 1861 (same); SNG Cop -; SNG München -; SNG Hunterian -, aVF, weight 12.848 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Beroea (Allepo, Syria) mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse AYT K MA OΠ CE MAKPINOC CE, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATOC ∆, eagle standing front, wings spread, head and tail left, wreath in beak, B - E divided by winged and horned lion-like animal standing facing below; ex Alex G. Malloy; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


Nabataean Kingdom, Syllaeus and Aretas IV, 9 B.C.

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Syllaeus was chief minister for Obodas III and he briefly shared rule of Nabataea with Aretas IV after Obodas death. But Syllaeus had a powerful enemy. In 24 B.C. Syllaeus had betrayed Rome causing almost the complete destruction of an army sent into Arabia Felix. Syllaeus was twice called to the court at Rome, where in 6 B.C. he was convicted of treason and Obodas' murder. He was beheaded and his body was pitched from the Tarpeian Rock.
GB57580. Bronze AE 16, cf. Meshorer Nabataean 43A, Schmitt-Korte II 25 ff. (shin left, O between horns), SNG ANS 1426, VF, nice patina, weight 3.341 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Petra mint, 9 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Aretas right, Aramaic shin behind(?); reverse crossed cornucopias, Aramaic ayin left, shin (Syllaeus) between horns, het (Aretas) right; $135.00 (€118.80)
 


Otacilia Severa, Augusta, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Zeugma, Commagene, Syria

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A tetrastyle temple is a temple with four columns. A peribolos is a court enclosed by a wall, especially one surrounding an ancient Greek or Roman temple.
GB90700. Bronze AE 29, BMC Galatia p. 128, 34; Butcher 31b; SNG München 435 var.(capricorn right); SGICV 4056 var. (same); SNG Cop -, Choice VF, perfect centering, weight 18.168 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 180o, Zeugma mint, Feb 244 - end Sep 249 A.D.; obverse MAP ΩTAKIΛ CEOYHPAN CEB, draped bust right, wearing stephane, crescent behind shoulders; reverse ZEYΓM−ATEΩN, tetrastyle temple with peribolos enclosing the sacred grove of trees, statue of seated Zeus within temple, capricorn left in exergue; $135.00 (€118.80)
 


Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes II the Great, 95 - 55 B.C.

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Tigranes was called "Tigranes the Great" by Plutarch. The "King of Kings" never appeared in public without having four kings attending him. At its height, Tigranes' empire extended from the Pontic Alps to Mesopotamia and from the Caspian to the Mediterranean. In 83 B.C., the Syrians offered him the crown and after conquering Phoenicia and Cilicia, he effectively ended the Seleucid Empire. His southern border reached as far as Akko-Ptolemais. The first Armenian ruler to issue coins, he adopted the Seleucid tradition and struck coins at Antioch and Damascus during his occupation of Syria from 83 to 69 B.C. In 66 B.C., Pompey advanced into Armenia with Tigranes' own son as an ally. Tigranes, now almost 75 years old, surrendered. Pompey treated him generously and returned some of his kingdom in return for 6,000 talents of silver. His unfaithful son was sent back to Rome as a prisoner. Tigranes continued to rule Armenia as an ally of Rome until his death in 55 B.C.
SH66375. Bronze four chalci, cf. Nercessian 84; Bedoukian CCA 119; BMC Seleucid p. 104, 12 (half chalkous); SNG Cop -, aF, weight 9.332 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus(?) mint, c. 83 - 69 B.C.; obverse head of Tigranes I right wearing five-pointed Armenian tiara, A behind; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ TIΓPANOY, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right, left hand on hip, uncertain letters outer left; ex Gianni Aiello Collection; rare; $130.00 (€114.40)
 


Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes V (Herodian Tigranes I), c. 6 - 12 A.D.

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"The reign of Tigranes V has generally been described as uneventful; his coins are similarly unremarkable. They do not commemorate any historical or military events but merely copy designs common to the Seleucid and autonomous city coinage of Mesopotamia, Syria, and Phoenicia. The standing Herakles/Vahagn, which was employed extensively by Tigranes the Great (CCA, 99-103), would have had particular appeal for the Phoenician population, as well as the Armenian." -- Frank L. Kovacs in "Tigranes IV, V, and VI: New Attributions"
SH66376. Bronze two chalkoi, Kovacs AJN 20 6, Nercessian ACV 159 (Tigranes IV), Bedoukian CCA 154 (same), aF, weight 4.718 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 45o, Damascus(?) mint, 8 - 5 B.C.; obverse heavily bearded head of Tigranes IV right, wearing Armenian tiara with five points, surrounded by dotted pearls, adorned with star; reverse BAΣIΛEΩC TIΓPANOY MEΓAΛOY, Herakles standing slightly left, nude, right hand resting on grounded club, Nemean lion skin draped on left arm; rare; $130.00 (€114.40)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

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When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Later legend elaborates, stating that Babylas demanded that he do penance for his part in the murder of the young Gordian III before he would allow Philip to celebrate Easter. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RP71451. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 971; BMC Galatia, p 219, 524; SNG Cop 270 var.(bust from side), F, centered, green patina, porous, some legend unstruck, weight 18.154 g, maximum diameter 32.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse AVTOK K MA IOVLI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩ, turreted, veiled and draped bust of Tyche of Antioch right, ram above, ∆- E / S - C across field; big 32.5 mm bronze!; $130.00 (€114.40)
 


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Heliopolis, Coele-Syria

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Heliopolis in Coele-Syria was made a colonia with the rights of the ius Italicum by Septimius Severus in 193. Work on the religious complex at Heliopolis lasted over a century and a half and was never completed. The Temple of Jupiter, the largest religious building in the entire Roman empire, was dedicated during the reign of Septimius Severus. Today, only six Corinthian columns remain standing. Eight more were shipped to Constantinople under Justinian's orders c. 532 - 537, for his basilica of Hagia Sophia.
RP58618. Bronze AE 18, Sawaya 628 ff. (D99/R229), SNG Cop 433, aVF, weight 5.927 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Heliopolis (Baalbek, Lebanon) mint, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL / HEL in two lines between two legionary eagles, all within laurel wreath; rare; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

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When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Legend says Babylas demanded he do penance for the murder of Gordian III before joining the celebration. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RP59309. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 977; BMC Galatia p. 215, 527, F, well centered, weight 14.385 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd issue; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩN, towered, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, ∆ - E / S - C across fields, ram leaping right with head turned back above, star below; big 31 mm bronze!; $105.00 (€92.40)
 


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Antioch, Syria

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The last regular tetradrachms minted at Antioch were struck during Gallus' second consulate. Prieur notes, "It is highly likely that the debasement of these issues made them so unreliable in the eyes of the public that a new system had to be developed. Since a system based on the antoninianus already existed in the western part of the empire, it naturally replaced the tetradrachm in the East."
RP72862. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1176(a); Prieur 671; BMC Galatia p. 228, 649; Dura Coins 590, VF, nice portrait, well centered on a crowded and slightly irregular flan, light corrosion, weight 10.969 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, second issue, 252 - 253 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K Γ OYIB TPEB ΓAΛΛOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind, • below; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠATO B, eagle standing facing, head and tail left, wings open, wreath in beak, A between legs, S C in exergue; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nysa Scythopolis, Decapolis

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Nysa Scythopolis (Beth Shean) was the center of Egyptian rule in the northern part of Canaan during the Late Bronze Period.


Click here to
see Beth Shean at BiblePlaces.com.
RP73078. Bronze AE 24, Barkay 85, Spijkerman 59, Sofaer 59, aF, weight 9.195 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 180o, Nysa-Scythopolis mint, 240 - 241 A.D.; obverse AVT K M ANT GOP∆IANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse NVC CKVΘOΠO IEPAC V, Dionysus advancing right, chlamys flying behind, thyrsos in right, placing left hand on head of small figure standing at feet before him, panther left but looking back right behind him, grape bunch upper right, ∆−T (year 304) divided across field; rare; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

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Marcus Julius Philippus Severus was the son of the Philip the Arab by his wife Marcia Otacilia Severa. He was six years old when, in February or March 244, his father became emperor and he was made caesar. In 247, he was consul, and in July or August he was elevated to Augustus and co-ruler. His father was killed in battle by his successor Decius in late 249. When news of this death reached Rome, Philip II was murdered by the Praetorian Guard. He died in his mother's arms, aged eleven years.
RY73080. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1013, Prieur 334, Dura Coins 451, VF, amusing portrait of the 6 year old caesar, excellent centering and strike, uneven toning, some marks, corrosion, coppery encrustations, weight 13.035 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, series 1, 244 A.D.; obverse MAP IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC KECAP, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing right on palm-frond right, wings spread, right wing behind right leg, head right, wreath in beak, S C in exergue; very rare; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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In 248, Trajan Decius put down the revolts of Pacatianus in Moesia and Iotapianus in Syria, by order of Emperor Philip. In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip.
RP57153. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 922, Prieur 375, Dura Coins 404, VF, weight 12.492 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 225o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 248 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings spread, open wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in exergue; $95.00 (€83.60)
 


Tetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C., Cleopatra Countermark

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Ptolemaios (also known as Ptolemy I) was succeeded by his son Lysanias, who was put to death by Marc Antony for supporting Mattathias Antigonus over Herod the Great, the Roman nominee for the Judaean throne. Antony gave the tiny kingdom of Chalkis to Cleopatra as a gift. Attribution of the countermark to Cleopatra is speculative, but the evidence seems to fit. Similar countermarks are known for Antioch, Chalkis, Seleukia and Laodicea.
GB57768. Bronze AE 20, HGC 9 1441; Herman 7; BMC Galatia p. 279, 2; SGCV II 5896 var; Lindgren 2134A, aVF, rough, weight 6.201 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libanos mint, 85 - 40 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; countermark: bust right in oval punch; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY / TETPAPΞOY / AXP (AX ligate), eagle flying right, monogram above tail; $95.00 (€83.60)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Laodicea ad Libanum, Syria

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The Hellenistic city, Laodicea ad Libanum, on the Orontes River in what is now Syria, appears to have been built on Tell Nebi Mend, the ruin-mound of the city of Kadesh. The site is still occupied today and has been the site of fighting and bombing during the current civil war.

The Battle of Kadesh, c. 1274 B.C., between the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II and the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II was fought at the site, and is the earliest battle in recorded history for which details of tactics and formations are known. It was probably the largest chariot battle ever fought, involving perhaps 5,000 - 6,000 chariots. The city was near the border of the two empires and changed hands several times. Ancient Kadesh vanishes from history after it was destroyed by the invading Sea Peoples in around 1178 B.C.
Hittite (orange) and Egyptian (green) Empires. Click to see Battle of Kadesh on Wikipedia
RP69641. Bronze AE 26, SNG Cop 445, Lindgren III 1288, BMC Galatia -, SNG München -, F, unusual red and black patina, clear inscriptions for the type, weight 10.584 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Libanum mint, obverse [...AVP?] CEOVH - ANTWNINOC, laureate head right; reverse ΛAO∆IK ΠPOC ΛIBANW, Mên standing facing before horse standing left, holding bridle of horse in right, scepter in left, horse's head turned back, MHN in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare; $95.00 (€83.60)
 


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RY72860. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1135(e); Prieur 598; Dura Coins 523; BMC Galatia p. 221, 587, VF, full circle centering, corrosion, minor flan crack and edge irregularities, weight 11.374 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 225o, 5th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 250 - 251 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ ME KY ∆EKIOC TPAIANOC CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind, five pellets below bust; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing left on palm frond, head left, wings spread, wreath in beak, S C in exergue; very rare; $95.00 (€83.60)
 


Antioch, Syria, Seleucia Pieria, Syria, c. 59 - 44 B.C.

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RPC I and Cohen DCA use 64/63 B.C. as year one of the Pompeian Era at Antioch. McAlee begins the era in 66 B.C.
RY73076. Bronze tetrachalkon, cf. McAlee 31 ff., RPC I 4205 ff., VF, nice style, nice green patina with red earthen highlighting, well centered other than date off flan, weight 7.149 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 59 - 44 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ANTIOXEΩN / THΣ / METPOΠOΛEΩΣ (downward in two lines on right and one on left), Zeus enthroned left, Nike in extended right hand offering him a wreath, long scepter vertical behind in left, Pompeian era date in exergue off flan; $95.00 (€83.60)
 


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RP57232. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1135(f); Prieur 546; BMC Galatia p. 220, 583; Dura Coins 524, aVF, weight 12.226 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT K Γ ME KY ∆EKIOC TPAIANOC CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind, S below bust; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC, S C, eagle standing left on palm branch, head left, wings spread, wreath in beak; scarce; $90.00 (€79.20)
 


Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

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When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Legend says Babylas demanded he do penance for the murder of Gordian III before joining the celebration. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RP69864. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 977; BMC Galatia p. 215, 527, F/VF, weight 12.175 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd issue; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩN, towered, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, ∆ - E / S - C across fields, ram leaping right with head turned back above, star below; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $90.00 (€79.20)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Rabbathmoba, Arabia

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Rabbathmoba, probably the Biblical Ir-Moab, was conquered by Alexander Jannaeus. Its ruins are 18 kilometers north of Kerak in Jordan.
RP72140. Bronze AE 24, Spijkerman 29b; BMC Arabia, p. 44, 5 var.(date P − ∆); Rosenberger 15 var. (same); SNG ANS -; Sofaer -, aF, green highlighting patina, porous, weight 8.987 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 315o, Rabbathmoba mint, 209 - 210 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC ANTΩNINOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PABAΘMOVBHNΩN, Poseidon standing left, nude, foot on prow, dolphin in right, trident vertical behind in left, ∆ − P (year 104) divided across field; $90.00 (€79.20)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Damascus, Coele Syria

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We were unable to find an example with complete legends or even read them with certainty combining parts from the six specimens we found in references and online. Some letters remain uncertain because they were blundered or partially off flan on all specimens examined.
RY73103. Bronze AE 24, SNG Cop 421, Lindgren-Kovacs A2141B, Rosenberger IV 20, SNG München -, BMC Galatia -, F, cleaning scratches, weight 8.182 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse CEV Π CE - AVTOK KAI (or similar, blundered), laureate and draped bust right, from front; reverse ∆AMACKHWN MHTPOΠOΛ-EWN (or similar, blundered), turreted and draped bust of Tyche left inside tetrastyle shrine with arch; extremely rare; $90.00 (€79.20)
 


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Antioch, Syria

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The Battle of Antioch. After Macrinus foolishly cut legionary pay, Legio III Gallica hailed Elagabalus as emperor on 16 May 218. Macrinus sent cavalry but they too joined Elagabalus. Macrinus finally abandoned his pay cut and paid a bonus, but it was too late. Legion II Parthica defected. General Gannys, the commander of Elagabalus' forces, decisively defeated Macrinus was just outside Antioch on 8 June 218. Macrinus shaved off his hair and beard and fled, disguised as a member of the military police. He was recognized by a centurion at Chalcedon on the Bosporus, taken back to Antioch and executed.
RY75896. Bronze provincial as, McAlee 726; Butcher 463; cf. BMC Galatia p. 198, 388 (...M O C MAK...); SGICV 2949; SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG München -, aVF, nice green patina, weight 4.640 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse AVT K M O CE MAKPINOC CE, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from front; reverse large S C, E above, ∆ below, all within wreath closed at the top with a star; ex Failla Numismatics; very rare; $90.00 (€79.20)
 


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip I. Philip's eleven-year-old son and heir was likely killed with his father.
RP57198. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1043; Prieur 473; BMC Galatia 559; Dura Coins 464; cf. SNG Cop 268 (attributed to Philip I), VF, weight 12.178 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆, eagle standing left, wings spread, head left, open wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C below; $85.00 (€74.80)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D. Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

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In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RP65923. Orichalcum as, McAlee 551, SRCV II 3695, RIC II 666 corr., VF, cleaning scratches, weight 7.465 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back and resting on helmet, Victory in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, round shield behind cuirass, S C in exergue; rare; $85.00 (€74.80)
 


Antioch, Syria, Civic Issue, 68 - 69 A.D.

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McAlee and RPC I identify the head as Apollo. SNG Copenhagen and BMC Galatia, older references, identify the head as Artemis. Although the laurel branch indicates Apollo and Apollo is often depicted quite feminine, on most coins it does look more like a woman.
RY73060. Bronze dichalkon, McAlee 116; RPC I 4323; BMC Galatia p. 162, 93; SNG Cop 106 var. (reversed date arrangement); SNG München -, Choice VF, green patina with red earthen highlighting, weight 4.393 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, reigns of Galba and Otho, 68 - 69 A.D.; obverse head of Artemis or Apollo right, hair bound with a taenia; reverse laurel branch, ET ZIP (from upper right, year 117 Caesarean era); scarce; $85.00 (€74.80)
 




    



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REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Sunday, May 01, 2016.
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Roman Decapolis, Syria and Arabia