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Home>Catalog>GreekCoins>GreekImperial>Decapolis,Arabia&Syria PAGE 1/3«««123»»»

Roman Provincial Coins from the Decapolis, Syria and Arabia

The Decapolis means "the ten cities" in Greek, yet we don't really know how many cities there were, or where they were. In 106 A.D., under the emperor Trajan, the
Nabataean Kingdom and the cities of the Decapolis were incorporated into the newly established Provinces of Syria and Arabia.


Click here to read "The Decapolis of Jordan" by Rami G. Khouri



Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60149. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Syria 507, EF, weight 13.825 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome or Antioch (Antakiyah, Syria) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in ex; double strike evident in obverse legend, minor flan crack, small encrustations, very sharp, handsome portrait and eagle; $285.00 (€213.75)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
SH60141. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 907a, Prieur 357, SNG Righetti 2027, SNG Cop -, EF, weight 10.949 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $280.00 (€210.00)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
RP59985. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 925, Prieur 355, EF, mint luster, weight 10.961 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in ex; $270.00 (€202.50)

Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes IV, 8 - 5 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Tigranes IV succeeded his father Tigranes III without the consent of Rome. He was dethroned after a few years.
SH66377. Bronze chalkous, Bedoukian 156, cf. Nercessian 166 (half chalkous), VF, weight 2.467 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, 8 - 5 B.C.; obverse heavily bearded head of Tigranes IV right, wearing Armenian tiara with four(?) points; reverse BAΣIΛEΩC TIΓPANOY MEΓAΛOY, eagle standing left, wings closed; rare; $270.00 (€202.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo "And the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch." -- Acts 11:26
SH60147. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 902, Prieur 371, EF, weight 11.716 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing facing, head and tail right, wreath in beak, wings spread, ANTIOXIA S C in ex; grainy areas of light corrosion, areas of mint luster, sharp detail, good portrait; $260.00 (€195.00)

Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes IV, 8 - 5 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Tigranes IV succeeded his father Tigranes III without the consent of Rome. He was dethroned after a few years.
SH66376. Bronze two chalkoi, Nercessian 159, Bedoukian 154, aF, weight 4.718 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 45o, Damascus mint, 8 - 5 B.C.; obverse heavily bearded head of Tigranes IV right, wearing Armenian tiara with five points, surrounded by dotted pearls, adorned with star and two eagles; reverse BAΣIΛEΩC TIΓPANOY MEΓAΛOY, Herakles standing slightly left, nude, right hand resting on grounded club, long spear vertical behind and lion skin in left; rare; $245.00 (€183.75)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
GS60146. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 935, Prieur 444; BMC Syria 517, aEF, weight 13.013 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 248 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆, eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C below; light corrosion on reverse, sharp detail, well centered and struck, some mint luster; $230.00 (€172.50)

Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes II the Great, 95 - 55 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Tigranes was called "Tigranes the Great" by Plutarch. The "King of Kings" never appeared in public without having four kings attending him. At its height, Tigranes' empire extended from the Pontic Alps to Mesopotamia and from the Caspian to the Mediterranean. In 83 B.C., the Syrians offered him the crown and after conquering Phoenicia and Cilicia, he effectively ended the Seleucid Empire. His southern border reached as far as Akko-Ptolemais. The first Armenian ruler to issue coins, he adopted the Seleucid tradition and struck coins at Antioch and Damascus during his occupation of Syria from 83 to 69 B.C. In 66 B.C., Pompey advanced into Armenia with Tigranes' own son as an ally. Tigranes, now almost 75 years old, surrendered. Pompey treated him generously and returned some of his kingdom in return for 6,000 talents of silver. His unfaithful son was sent back to Rome as a prisoner. Tigranes continued to rule Armenia as an ally of Rome until his death in 55 B.C.
SH66375. Bronze four chalci, cf. Nercessian 84; Bedoukian 119; BMC Seleucid p. 104, 12 (half chalkous); SNG Cop -, aF, weight 9.332 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, c. 83 - 69 B.C.; obverse head of Tigranes I right wearing five-pointed Armenian tiara, A behind; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ TIΓPANOY, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right, left hand on hip, uncertain letters outer left; ex Gianni Aiello Collection; rare; $225.00 (€168.75)

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Hieropolis, Cyrrhestica, Syria
Click for a larger photo In the 3rd century, Hieropolis was the capital of Euphratensis province and one of the great cities of Syria. Procopius called it the greatest in that part of the world. It was, however, ruinous when Julian collected his troops there before marching to his defeat and death in Mesopotamia.
SH57096. Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 926, aVF, weight 14.807 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 0o, Hieropolis mint, 215 - 217 A.D.; obverse AYT KM A − ANTΩNINOC C−E−B, laureate head right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATO CTO ∆, eagle standing facing, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, lion walking right between legs; apt stern portrait of the monstrous emperor; scarce; $210.00 (€157.50)

Southeast Arabia, Imitative of King Abi'el, c. 1st Century B.C.- 1st Century A.D., Imitative of Alexander III The Great
Click for a larger photo This type is imitative of issues by King Abi'el of South Arabia, c. 240 - 200 B.C. King Abi'el's coinage was imitative of the coinage of Alexander the Great, however, on the coins of King Abiel, the figure on the reverse holds a horse protome (forepart) instead of an eagle. On later debased silver imitatives, such as this one, the figure holds a small full horse. These types are most frequently found in the U.A.E. between Abu Dhabi and ed-Dour. Dating for these imitatives is uncertain but hoard evidence indicates they were still circulating in the 1st century A.D.
SH58774. Billon obol, cf. van Alfen Abiel, Style 2.5 (Potts Class S5), 115, VF, weight 0.926 g, maximum diameter 9.8 mm, die axis 90o, Mleiha(?) mint, c. 1st Century B.C. - 1st Century A.D.; obverse deified head of Alexander right, wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse male deity seated left, small horse in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, palm in lower left field, trident pointing upwards in right field; rare; $200.00 (€150.00)

Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D., Laodicaea ad Mare, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo Laodikea ad Mar (Latakia, Syria) has been inhabited since the second millennium B.C. It was renamed by Seleucus I Nicator in honor of his mother, Laodice, and was a major port for the Seleukid Kingdom. Pompey created the new Roman province of Syria in 64 B.C. The Romans modified the name to Laodicea-ad-Mare.
RP69593. Bronze AE 25, SNG Mόnchen 928; BMC Galatia p. 257, 80; Lindgren I 2086 - 2087; SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -, SNG Righetti -, VF, nice for the type, incomplete legends (as on all known specimens), weight 9.738 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicaea ad Mare mint, obverse AUTO KAI -, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse IOYΛIEΩN − KAI ΛAO∆IKEΩN (Ω's upside down), Dionysos standing facing, nude, head left, kantharos in right, thyrsos vertical behind in left, panther at feet on left, ΠO − MAP at sides; very rare; $180.00 (€135.00)

Nabataean Kingdom, Syllaeus and Aretas IV, 9 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Syllaeus was chief minister for Obodas III and he briefly shared rule of Nabataea with Aretas IV after Obodas death. But Syllaeus had a powerful enemy. In 24 B.C. Syllaeus had betrayed Rome causing almost the complete destruction of an army sent into Arabia Felix. Syllaeus was twice called to the court at Rome, where in 6 B.C. he was convicted of treason and Obodas' murder. He was beheaded and his body was pitched from the Tarpeian Rock.
GB57580. Bronze AE 14, cf. Meshorer Nabataean 43A, Schmitt-Korte II 25 ff. (shin left, O between horns), SNG ANS 1426, VF, nice patina, weight 3.341 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Petra mint, 9 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Aretas right, Aramaic shin behind(?); reverse crossed cornucopias, Aramaic ayin left, shin (Syllaeus) between horns, het (Aretas) right; $175.00 (€131.25)

Philip II, July or August 247 - late 249 A.D., Heliopolis, Coele-Syria
Click for a larger photo
RP58618. Bronze AE 18, Sawaya Heliopolis 628 ff. (D99/R229), SNG Cop 433, aVF, weight 5.927 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Heliopolis (Baalbek, Lebanon) mint, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL / HEL in two lines between two legionary eagles, all within laurel wreath; rare; $155.00 (€116.25)

Tetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C., Cleopatra Countermark
Click for a larger photo Ptolemaios (also known as Ptolemy I) was succeeded by his son Lysanias, who was put to death by Marc Antony for supporting Mattathias Antigonus over Herod the Great, the Roman nominee for the Judaean throne. Antony gave the tiny kingdom of Chalkis to Cleopatra as a gift. Attribution of the countermark to Cleopatra is speculative, but the evidence seems to fit. Similar countermarks are known for Antioch, Chalkis, Seleukia and Laodicea.
CM26351. Bronze AE 18, Herman 9.a (same countermark), Lindgren III, p. 69, 1231 f., Hoover Syrian 1445 (R1), aVF, weight 4.162 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libanos mint, 85 - 40 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right, no inscription, oval countermark (of Cleopatra VII?); reverse The Dioscuri standing facing, heads turned looking at each other, leaning on spears in outer hands, no inscription, in fields four monograms; ex Phil DeVicchi collection; rare; $150.00 (€112.50)

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Antioch, Syria, Mesopotamian(?) Imitative
Click for a larger photo
RP67921. Bronze semis, for official prototype see McAlee 209, RPC I 4105 (normal S C, Antioch mint, c. 14 - 37 A.D.), F, weight 6.916 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, Mesopotamian(?) mint, c. 22 BC; obverse AVGVST TR POT, laureate head right; reverse retrograde S C, within linear circle surrounded by laurel wreath; rare; $150.00 (€112.50)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Claudia Leukas (Balanea), Syria
Click for a larger photo The dedication of a sanctuary of Tyche at Balanea/Claudia Leukas, shortly after 37 B.C. or c. 50 A.D. has survived (Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum 36-1284, 114 words). The local era of city began in 38/37 B.C. and may correspond to the dedication of the sanctuary. Or perhaps the dedication may have been held when Balanea was refounded by Emperor Claudius as Claudia Leucas sometime between 48 and 51 A.D.
RP69597. Bronze AE 25, De Saulcy p. 27, 2; SNG Cop -; SNG Mόnchen -; SNG Righetti -; SNG Hunterian -; BMC Galatia -; Mionnet -; Lindgren -; SGICV -, F, porous, weight 14.180 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 315o, Claudia Leukas mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse CEP (downward on left) CEVHPOC (upward on right), laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΛEYKA∆IΩN (in exergue), Tyche standing right within tetrastyle sanctuary, peaked tent roof over central arch, wearing mural crown and kalathos, long scepter in left, left foot on river god Chrysoroas swimming below, BΛC (year 232 of local era) on right; very rare; $150.00 (€112.50)

Laodikea ad Mare, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, 100 B.C. - 100 A.D.
Click for a larger photo This is the Lindgren I plate coin and the only example of the type known to Forum. It is extremely rare and possibly unique. We purchased this coin from the Butte College Foundation, to which Henry Clay Lindgren donated some of his collection.
GB69629. Bronze AE 18, Lindgren I A2061A (this coin), BMC Galatia - (cf. 12 for similar rev), RPC I -, Hoover Syrian -, www -, F, overstruck(?), scratches, weight 3.848 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Laodikea ad Mare mint, 100 B.C. - 100 A.D.; obverse head of Apollo right, hair rolled; reverse ΛAO∆IKE / THΣ IEPAΣ (downward on left), KAI / AYTONOM (downward on right), Artemis standing half left, wearing short chiton, holding bow(?) and spear(?), uncertain monogram or date in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren Collection (plate coin), extremely rare, possibly unique; $150.00 (€112.50)

Tetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C., Cleopatra Countermark
Click for a larger photo Ptolemaios (also known as Ptolemy I) was succeeded by his son Lysanias, who was put to death by Marc Antony for supporting Mattathias Antigonus over Herod the Great, the Roman nominee for the Judaean throne. Antony gave the tiny kingdom of Chalkis to Cleopatra as a gift. Attribution of the countermark to Cleopatra is speculative, but the evidence seems to fit. Similar countermarks are known for Antioch, Chalkis, Seleukia and Laodicea.
GB57768. Bronze AE 20, Hoover Syrian 1441; Herman 7; BMC Syria p. 279, 2; SGCV II 5896 var; Lindgren 2134A, aVF, rough, weight 6.201 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libanos mint, 85 - 40 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; countermark: bust right in oval punch; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY / TETPAPΞOY / AXP (AX ligate), eagle flying right, monogram above tail; $140.00 (€105.00)

Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Uncertain Caesarea, Syria
Click for a larger photo RPC attributes this rare type to an uncertain mint named Caesarea. See RPC I p. 599 for a discussion of its attribution.
RP58658. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 4084, SNG Cop 177 (Caesarea in Cappadocia), BMC Lycaonia 5 (Anazarbus), VF, weight 5.545 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Caesarea mint, obverse KΛAY∆IOC KAICAP, laureate head right; reverse ETOYC KAICAPEΩN Γ (year 3), turreted, veiled and draped bust of Tyche right; rare; $140.00 (€105.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria
Click for a larger photo In 127 A.D., Hadrian returned to Rome after a seven year voyage to the Roman provinces.
RB65922. Orichalcum semis, McAlee 547(a), RIC II 688, SRCV II 3701, Cohen 443, BMCRE -, VF, nice portrait, weight 3.860 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, lyre, S - C flanking across field; $135.00 (€101.25)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.. Struck at Rome for Use in Syria
Click for a larger photo In 125 A.D., the Pantheon was constructed in Rome as it stands today.
RP65923. Orichalcum as, McAlee 551, SRCV II 3695, RIC II 666 corr., VF, cleaning scratches, weight 7.465 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, right foot drawn back and resting on helmet, Victory in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, round shield behind cuirass, S C in exergue; rare; $135.00 (€101.25)

Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Later legend elaborates, stating that Babylas demanded that he do penance for his part in the murder of the young Gordian III before he would allow Philip to celebrate Easter. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RP59309. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 977; BMC Syria p. 215, 527, F, well centered, weight 14.385 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 2nd issue; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩN , towered, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, ∆ - E / S - C across fields, ram leaping right with head turned back above, star below; big 31 mm bronze!; $135.00 (€101.25)

Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 242 A.D., Gordian III marched against the Persian invasion of the East, and relieved Antioch from siege. In 243, Shapur I retreated to Persia, giving up all the territories he conquered.
RP57239. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 874; Prieur 302; BMC Syria p. 212, 502; Dura 384, VF, weight 12.032 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 241 - 244 A.D; obverse AVTOK K M ANT ΓOR∆IANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠA TO B, eagle standing facing, wings spread, head left, wreath in beak; below: crescent over ram running right with head turned back left; well centered, nice patina; $130.00 (€97.50)

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Struck at Rome for use in Syria
Click for a larger photo This type is typically attributed to Antioch, but recent metallurgical tests suggest it was struck by the Rome mint for use in Syria.

In 115, Trajan was in Antioch for his war against Parthia, when the city was struck by an earthquake. He was forced to take shelter in the circus for several days. He and his successor restored the city.
RB68079. Orichalcum as, McAlee 509, BMCRE III 1093, RIC II 647, SRCV II 3243, VF, areas if corrosion, weight 7.572 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 115 - 116 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GERM, radiate and draped bust right; reverse DAC PARTHICO P M TR POT XX COS VI P P, large S C in wreath; $130.00 (€97.50)

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, Trajan Decius put down the revolts of Pacatianus in Moesia and Iotapianus in Syria, by order of Emperor Philip. In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip.
RP57153. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 922, Prieur 375, Dura 404, VF, weight 12.492 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 225o, Antioch mint, 248 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings spread, open wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in exergue; $125.00 (€93.75)

Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip I. Philip's eleven-year-old son and heir was likely killed with his father.
RP57187. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1043; Prieur 473; BMC Syria 559; Dura 464; cf. SNG Cop 268 (attributed to Philip I), VF, toned, weight 12.297 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 248 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO ∆, eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C below; $125.00 (€93.75)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Gadara, Decapolis
Click for a larger photo Another option for the countermark could be the head of Hadrian applied during the Second Jewish Revolt ("Bar Kochba" uprising) led by Simon Bar Kochba against Rome, 133 - 135 A.D. In 135 A.D., Hadrian destroyed Jerusalem and founded "Aelia Capitolina" on the site. The Jews were dispersed throughout the Roman Empire.
RP59018. Bronze AE 23, Spijkerman 26; SNG ANS 6, 1300; countermark: cf. Howgego 207 (Tyche), F, weight 9.368 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Decapolis, Gadara mint, 71 - 72 A.D.; obverse OYECΠACIANOC KAICAP, laureate head right; reverse ΓA∆APA, Tyche standing left, wreath in right, cornucopia in left, date LEΛP left; $125.00 (€93.75)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria
Click for a larger photo An interesting type with Tyche of Antioch and the river-god Orontes, but struck at the Rome mint!
RP57016. Orichalcum as, McAlee 544a, RIC II 680 corr., SRCV II 3696, F, area of corrosion on rev, weight 8.502 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COS III, Tyche seated left on rock, stalks of grain in right, resting left elbow on stork, river god swimming right at feet, S - C flanking across field; rare (R2); $120.00 (€90.00)

Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RP57232. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1135(f); Prieur 546; BMC Syria p. 220, 583; Dura 524, aVF, weight 12.226 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakiyah, Syria) mint, obverse AVT K Γ ME KY ∆EKIOC TPAIANOC CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind, S below bust; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC, S C, eagle standing left on palm branch, head left, wings spread, wreath in beak; scarce; $115.00 (€86.25)

Samosata, Commagene, Syria, Under Roman Rule, c. 40 - 30 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Overstruck on an Antiochene issue (Head of Zeus/Zeus enthroned type), as are all the specimens cited in RPC. The lion side is usually identified as the obverse but the slight incuse on that side indicates the Tyche die was in the anvil.
GB56466. Bronze AE 26, SGCV II 5842, RPC I 3849, BMC Syria p. 116, 4 - 6, F, overstruck, weight 13.033 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Samosata mint, c. 40 - 30 B.C.; obverse Tyche seated right on rock, holding palm; CAMOCATΩ behind, ΠOΛEΩC before; reverse lion walking right right; very rare; $110.00 (€82.50)



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Roman Decapolis, Syria and Arabia