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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Greek Imperial ▸ GreeceView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins from Greece

Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 140 - 175 A.D.

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King Minos demanded that, every ninth year, Athens send seven boys and seven girls to Crete to be devoured by the Minotaur, a half-man, half-bull monster that lived in the Labyrinth. Theseus, son of Aigeus, the king of Athens, volunteered to take the place of one of the youths and slay the monster to stop this horror. Upon his arrival to Crete, Ariadne, King Minos' daughter, fell in love with him and gave him a ball of thread to help him find his way out of the Labyrinth. Theseus promised Ariadne that if he escaped he would take her with him. Using the string to mark his path, he made his way to the heart of the Labyrinth, slew the Minotaur, followed the string out, and then rescued the Athenian boys and girls. Athena told Theseus to leave Ariadne and Phaedra behind on the beach. Distressed by his broken heart, Theseus forgot to put up the white sails that were to signal his success. Upon seeing black sails, his father committed suicide, throwing himself off a cliff into the sea, causing this body of water to be named the Aegean.
GB77873. Bronze drachm, BMC Attica p. 105, 764; SNG Cop 341; Svoronos Athens, pl. 96, 1; Kroll 276, aF, corrosion, weight 7.132 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Athens mint, pseudo-autonomous under Rome, c. 140 - 175 A.D.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse AΘHNAIΩN, Theseus right, preparing to slay the Minotaur, nude, planting knee on the back of Minotaur, raising club in his right hand, a horn of the Minotaur in his left hand, the Minotaur falling right on left knee; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren (Antioch Associates); very rare; $500.00 (445.00)


Claudius and Messalina, 24 January 41 - 48 A.D., Knossos, Crete

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Messalina was Claudius' 3rd wife and mother of Britannicus and Claudia Octavia. They were married when she was 14. In 48 A.D., while Claudius was away in Ostia, even though she was married to the emperor, Messalina married her lover, Gaius Silius. Silius was executed and Messalina driven to suicide.
SH74280. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1001 (rev legend ending IIVIR) or 1002, Svoronos Crete 214 corr. (IIVIR) or 212, SNG Cop -, BMC Crete -, aVF, crowded irregular flan, weight 4.393 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Knossos mint, Duumviri Cytherus und Capito, 41 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS, bare head of Claudius left; reverse VALERIA MESSALINA [CAPITONE CYTHERONTE IIVIR] or [CYTHERO CAPITONE] (end of legend off flan), draped bust of Messalina right; extremely rare; $480.00 (427.20)


Apollonia, Illyria, Greece, c. 120 - 70 B.C.

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Strabo, in about 17 A.D. wrote: "On the territory of the people of Apollonia in Illyria there is what is called a nymphaeum. It is a rock which emits fire. Below it are springs flowing with hot water and asphalt..." The Nymphaeum was likely a burning natural gas seep.
GS83574. Silver drachm, BMC Thessaly p. 59, 41 - 42; SNG Cop 398; Maier p. 15, 120, VF, bumps, scratches, corrosion, small edge split, weight 3.05 g, maximum diameter 17.34 mm, die axis 90o, Apollonia mint, magistrates Aibatios & Chairenos, c. 120 - 70 B.C.; obverse AIBATIOΣ, cow standing left, head turned back right, suckling calf standing right, grain ear left in exergue; reverse AΠOΛ − XAI−PH−NOΣ, the Nymphaeum of Apollonia ablaze, lagobolon below, within double linear square with sides curved inward; very rare; $200.00 (178.00)


Thessaly, Greece, Koinon of Thessaly, 117 -138 A.D.

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The Thessalian League was a loose confederacy of city-states and tribes in the Thessalian valley in N. Greece. Philip II of Macedon took control of Thessaly in 344 B.C and it remained under Macedonia until the Roman victory in 197 B.C. The league was reestablished in 196 B.C. but had little autonomy after Thessaly became part of the province of Macedonia in 146 B.C.
GB74543. Bronze assarion, Burrer Em 1, Series 2, Group 4, 152; BCD Thessaly I 1410, SNG Cop 141 - 142, F, green patina, corrosion, encrustation, scratches, weight 1.556 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 180o, time of Hadrian, c. 123 - 125 A.D.; obverse AXIΛ−ΛEYΣ (Achilles), head of Achilles right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with Pegasos; reverse NIKO−MA−XOY (Niomachos, strategos), horse trotting right, TΦA monogram below; $160.00 (142.40)


Thessalian League, Greece, Mid - Late 1st Century B.C.

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The Thessalian League was a loose confederacy of city-states and tribes in the Thessalian valley in N. Greece. Philip II of Macedon took control of Thessaly in 344 B.C and it remained under Macedonia until the Roman victory in 197 B.C. The league was reestablished in 196 B.C. but had little autonomy after Thessaly became part of the province of Macedonia in 146 B.C.
GB71024. Bronze dichalkon (or obol), BCD Thessaly II 907.2, SNG Cop 331, Rogers 59, Burrer p. 62, BMC Thessaly -, VF, weight 7.412 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa(?) mint, Philokrates, Italos, and Petraios, magistrates; obverse ΦIΛOKPA−TOYΣ (magistrate), head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet and aegis; reverse ΘEΣΣA−ΛΩN, Athena Itonia standing left, Nike standing left offering wreath in her extended right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield behind, spear standing behind, ITA−ΛOY (magistrate) across upper field, ΠETPAIOΣ in exergue; $135.00 (120.15)


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, 229 - 30 B.C.

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After the decisive defeat of the Illyrians to Rome in 229 B.C., the new Roman rulers renamed the city. The original name, Epidamnos, was similar to the Latin word damnum, meaning "loss" or "harm." Dyrrhachion is Greek for "bad spine" or "difficult ridge," probably referring to imposing cliffs near the city. This type circulated alongside, and presumably at parity with, Roman Republican denarii.
GS79593. Silver drachm, Ceka 320; BMC Thessaly p. 69, 62, VF, tight flan, weight 2.848 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 90o, Dyrrhachium (Durrs, Albania) mint, 229 - 30 B.C.; obverse MENIΣKOΣ, cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left, raven above; reverse ∆YP − ∆IO−NY−ΣIOY, around, double stellate pattern within double linear square; $85.00 (75.65)


Thespiai, Boiotia, Greece, 146 - 27 B.C.

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Thespiae stood on level ground commanded by the low range of hills which run eastward from the foot of Mount Helicon to Thebes, near modern Thespies. During the Hellenistic Period Thespiae sought the friendship of the Roman Republic in the war against Mithridates VI. It is subsequently mentioned by Strabo as a place of some size, and by Pliny as a free city within the Roman Empire, a reward for its support against Mithridates. Thespiae hosted an important group of Roman negotiatores until the refoundation of Corinth in 44 B.C.
GB76252. Bronze AE 14, BCD Boiotia 611; Head Boeotia p. 94, pl. VI, 13; BMC Central p. 92, 14, pl. XVI, 12; SNG Cop 406 - 407; HGC 4 1408 (S), VF, weight 3.511 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, Thespiai mint, 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse female (Arsinoe III) head right, wearing kalathos and veil; reverse chelys, ΘEΣΠI/EΩN in two downward lines, starting on right, ending on left, all in laurel wreath; ex BCD with his tag noting, "Pz. nz. Th., Jan 86, 1000 drs."; scarce; $80.00 (71.20)


Thespiai, Boiotia, Greece, 146 - 27 B.C.

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Thespiae stood on level ground commanded by the low range of hills which run eastward from the foot of Mount Helicon to Thebes, near modern Thespies. During the Hellenistic Period Thespiae sought the friendship of the Roman Republic in the war against Mithridates VI. It is subsequently mentioned by Strabo as a place of some size, and by Pliny as a free city within the Roman Empire, a reward for its support against Mithridates. Thespiae hosted an important group of Roman negotiatores until the refoundation of Corinth in 44 B.C.
GB76253. Bronze AE 16, BCD Boiotia 611; Head Boeotia p. 94, pl. VI, 13; BMC Central p. 92, 14, pl. XVI, 12; SNG Cop 406 - 407; HGC 4 1408 (S), F, green patina, earthen deposits, weight 4.046 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 90o, Thespiai mint, 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse female (Arsinoe III) head right, wearing kalathos and veil; reverse chelys, ΘEΣΠI/EΩN in two downward lines, starting on right, ending on left, all in laurel wreath; ex BCD with his tag noting, "Ex Ian Johnson, FPL, Vol. XI, no. 5, Sep 92, no. 4"; scarce; $75.00 (66.75)


Thessalian League, Thessaly, Greece, c. 146 - 27 B.C.

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The Thessalian League was a loose confederacy of city-states and tribes in the Thessalian valley in N. Greece. Philip II of Macedon took control of Thessaly in 344 B.C and it remained under Macedonia until the Roman victory in 197 B.C. The league was reestablished in 196 B.C. but had little autonomy after Thessaly became part of the province of Macedonia in 146 B.C.
GB66043. Bronze dichalkon, Rogers Thessaly 43; BMC Thessaly p. 5, 62 - 63; SNG Cop 324 ff. var. (various magistrate names on obv); BCD Thessaly II 904 ff. var. (same), VF, weight 3.713 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 45o, Thessaly mint, c. 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right, IΠΠIA/TAΣ(?) (magistrate) above and below; reverse ΘEΣ−Σ/AΛΩ−N, horse trotting right; ex Harlan J. Berk, Ltd.; $60.00 (53.40)


Thessalian League, Greece, c. 146 - 27 B.C.

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The Thessalian League was a loose confederacy of city-states and tribes in the Thessalian valley in N. Greece. Philip II of Macedon took control of Thessaly in 344 B.C and it remained under Macedonia until the Roman victory in 197 B.C. The league was reestablished in 196 B.C. but had little autonomy after Thessaly became part of the province of Macedonia in 146 B.C.
GB79597. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Thessaly 1385.4; BMC Thessaly p. 6, 64; SNG Cop 324; Rogers 45; BCD Thessaly 2012 -, gF, earthen deposits, weight 5.058 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, c. 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; NYΣ−ΣAN,∆POY (magistrate) starting above, then downward on left, ending in exergue; reverse horse trotting right, stalk of grain upright on right; ΘEΣ/ΣAΛΛΩ−N in two lines, one above and one below; $60.00 (53.40)


Thespiai, Boiotia, Greece, 146 - 27 B.C.

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Thespiae stood on level ground commanded by the low range of hills which run eastward from the foot of Mount Helicon to Thebes, near modern Thespies. During the Hellenistic Period Thespiae sought the friendship of the Roman Republic in the war against Mithridates VI. It is subsequently mentioned by Strabo as a place of some size, and by Pliny as a free city within the Roman Empire, a reward for its support against Mithridates. Thespiae hosted an important group of Roman negotiatores until the refoundation of Corinth in 44 B.C.
GB76256. Bronze AE 15, BCD Boiotia 611; Head Boeotia p. 94, pl. VI, 13; BMC Central p. 92, 14, pl. XVI, 12; SNG Cop 406 - 407; HGC 4 1408 (S), F, corrosion, weight 3.951 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Thespiai mint, 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse female (Arsinoe III) head right, wearing kalathos and veil; reverse chelys, ΘEΣΠI/EΩN in two downward lines, starting on right, ending on left, all in laurel wreath; ex BCD with his tag noting, "Ex Leu (ex old collection) Oct. 96, SFr. 5."; ex Bruder Egger, Vienna (with his tag); scarce; $55.00 (48.95)


Thespiai, Boiotia, Greece, 146 - 27 B.C.

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Thespiae stood on level ground commanded by the low range of hills which run eastward from the foot of Mount Helicon to Thebes, near modern Thespies. During the Hellenistic Period Thespiae sought the friendship of the Roman Republic in the war against Mithridates VI. It is subsequently mentioned by Strabo as a place of some size, and by Pliny as a free city within the Roman Empire, a reward for its support against Mithridates. Thespiae hosted an important group of Roman negotiatores until the refoundation of Corinth in 44 B.C.
GB76255. Bronze AE 14, BCD Boiotia 611; Head Boeotia p. 94, pl. VI, 13; BMC Central p. 92, 14, pl. XVI, 12; SNG Cop 406 - 407; HGC 4 1408 (S), F, green patina, earthen deposits, weight 3.479 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 90o, Thespiai mint, 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse female (Arsinoe III) head right, wearing kalathos and veil; reverse chelys, ΘEΣΠI/EΩN in two downward lines, starting on right, ending on left, all in laurel wreath; ex BCD with his tag noting, "Ex Kunker 27, 27 Sept. 94, part of lot 191, the lot of 73 pcs for DM 1400+15%+7%"; scarce; $50.00 (44.50)


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, c. 229 - 30 B.C.

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This type circulated alongside, and presumably at parity with, Roman Republican denarii.
GS83707. Silver drachm, Ceka 320; BMC Thessaly p. 69, 62, F, uneven strike, reverse slightly off center, weight 2.629 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, Dyrrhachium (Durrs, Albania) mint, c. 200 - 30 B.C.; obverse MENIΣKOΣ, cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left, raven above; reverse ∆YP − ∆IO−NY−ΣIOY, around, double stellate pattern within double linear square; $50.00 (44.50)


Thespiai, Boiotia, Greece, 146 - 27 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Thespiae stood on level ground commanded by the low range of hills which run eastward from the foot of Mount Helicon to Thebes, near modern Thespies. During the Hellenistic Period Thespiae sought the friendship of the Roman Republic in the war against Mithridates VI. It is subsequently mentioned by Strabo as a place of some size, and by Pliny as a free city within the Roman Empire, a reward for its support against Mithridates. Thespiae hosted an important group of Roman negotiatores until the refoundation of Corinth in 44 B.C.
GB76254. Bronze AE 16, BCD Boiotia 611; Head Boeotia p. 94, pl. VI, 13; BMC Central p. 92, 14, pl. XVI, 12; SNG Cop 406 - 407; HGC 4 1408 (S), VF/aF, nice portrait, reddish-brown patina, weight 3.494 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, Thespiai mint, 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse female (Arsinoe III) head right, wearing kalathos and veil; reverse chelys, ΘEΣΠI/EΩN in two downward lines, starting on right, ending on left, all in laurel wreath; ex BCD with his tag noting, "Ex Ian Johnson, FPL, Vol. XI, no. 5, Sep 92, no. 4"; scarce; $45.00 (40.05)


Thespiai, Boiotia, Greece, 146 - 27 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Thespiae stood on level ground commanded by the low range of hills which run eastward from the foot of Mount Helicon to Thebes, near modern Thespies. During the Hellenistic Period Thespiae sought the friendship of the Roman Republic in the war against Mithridates VI. It is subsequently mentioned by Strabo as a place of some size, and by Pliny as a free city within the Roman Empire, a reward for its support against Mithridates. Thespiae hosted an important group of Roman negotiatores until the refoundation of Corinth in 44 B.C.
GB76251. Bronze AE 16, BCD Boiotia 611; Head Boeotia p. 94, pl. VI, 13; BMC Central p. 92, 14, pl. XVI, 12; SNG Cop 406 - 407; HGC 4 1408 (S), aVF, light corrosion, edge crack, weight 3.373 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Thespiai mint, 146 - 27 B.C.; obverse female (Arsinoe III) head right, wearing kalathos and veil; reverse chelys, ΘEΣΠI/EΩN in two downward lines, starting on right, ending on left, all in laurel wreath; ex BCD with his tag noting, "Pr. nz. Th., Jan 86, 1000 drs."; scarce; $36.00 (32.04)







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Catalog current as of Thursday, September 29, 2016.
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Roman Greece