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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Gods,Non-Olympian>Spes

Elpis or Spes

Elpis was the Greek, and Spes the Roman, personification of Hope. According the Hesiod's famous story, Elpis was the last to escape the Pandora's box. It can be debated whether she was really about "hope" as we understand it, or rather mere "expectation." In art, Elpis is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - the last resort of men.


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo Elpis was the Greek equivalent of the Roman Spes, the goddess of hope. She was traditionally defined as "the last goddess" (Spes, ultima dea), meaning that hope is the last resource available to men. Elpis personified hope for good harvests, and for children, and was invoked at births, marriages, and other important times.
BB71192. Billon tetradrachm, Milne 4750; Curtis 1980; Geissen 3202; SNG Cop 968; Emmett 4046; BMC Alexandria p. 323, 2499 var (obverse legend, in error?), VF, weight 8.864 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 20 Nov 284 - 28 Aug 285 A.D.; obverse A K Γ OYAΛ ∆IOKΛHTIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Elpis standing left, flower in right hand, raising fold of chiton with left, LA (year 1) left; $35.00 SALE PRICE $31.50

Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo Elpis was the Greek equivalent of the Roman Spes, the goddess of hope. She was traditionally defined as "the last goddess" (Spes, ultima dea), meaning that hope is the last resource available to men. Elpis personified hope for good harvests, and for children, and was invoked at births, marriages, and other important times.
BB71206. Billon tetradrachm, Milne 4750; Curtis 1980; Geissen 3202; SNG Cop 968; Emmett 4046; BMC Alexandria p. 323, 2499 var (obverse legend, in error?), VF, typical tight flan, weight 8.247 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 20 Nov 284 - 28 Aug 285 A.D.; obverse A K Γ OYAΛ ∆IOKΛHTIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Elpis standing left, flower in right hand, raising fold of chiton with left, LA (year 1) left; $35.00 SALE PRICE $31.50

Maximianus, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo Elpis was the Greek equivalent of the Roman Spes, the goddess of hope. She was traditionally defined as "the last goddess" (Spes, ultima dea), meaning that hope is the last resource available to men. Elpis personified hope for good harvests, and for children, and was invoked at births, marriages, and other important times.
RX71235. Billon tetradrachm, cf. Milne 4829; Dattari 5875; Curtis 2071; Geissen 3286; BMC Alexandria p. 329, 2556; SNG Cop 1024; Kampmann 120.17 (Milne 4814, Emmett 4114), VF, excellent centering, weak legend, weight 7.235 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 286 - 28 Aug 287; obverse A K M OYA MAΞIMIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Elpis standing left, flower in right, raising drapery with left, star behind, L - B (year 2) flanking across field; $35.00 SALE PRICE $31.50

Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt
Click for a larger photo Elpis was the Greek equivalent of the Roman Spes, the goddess of hope. She was traditionally defined as "the last goddess" (Spes, ultima dea), meaning that hope is the last resource available to men. Elpis personified hope for good harvests, and for children, and was invoked at births, marriages, and other important times.
BB71198. Billon tetradrachm, Milne 4750; Curtis 1980; Geissen 3202; SNG Cop 968; Emmett 4046; BMC Alexandria p. 323, 2499 var (obverse legend, in error?), Nice F, well centered, highlighting patina, some earthen encrustation, weight 7.645 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 20 Nov 284 - 28 Aug 285 A.D.; obverse A K Γ OYAΛ ∆IOKΛHTIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Elpis standing left, flower in right hand, raising fold of chiton with left, LA (year 1) left; $25.00 SALE PRICE $22.50


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Catalog current as of Saturday, January 31, 2015.
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Elpis or Spes