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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive Emperors ▸ Faustina Jr.View Options:  |  |  | 

Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - winter 175/176 A.D, wife of Marcus Aurelius

The daughter, wife and mother of emperors and empresses, Faustina II was born around 130 A.D. to Antoninus Pius and Faustina I. She was married to her cousin Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. In 146 A.D., she gave birth to the first of many children. To celebrate this occasion she was given the title of Augusta, which technically made her superior in rank to her husband. Faustina II was a devoted wife and mother, and accompanied her husband on all his military campaigns. Her son Commodus went on to become emperor after his fathers' death, and her daughter Lucilla became Augusta when she married Lucius Verus in 164 A.D. She died at the city of Halala in Asia Minor in 175 A.D. plagued by many baseless rumors about her infidelity. She was deified soon after and a grand temple was erected to her in the city where she died.


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In Roman religion, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. The cult of Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was of special importance to the imperial household. She is usually depicted wearing a long cloak and holding a patera (sacrificial bowl), a cornucopia (symbol of prosperity), or a caduceus (symbol of peace).
RB26685. Orichalcum sestertius, SRCV II 4710, RIC III 1368, BMCRE IV 2198, VF, weight 19.689 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 157 - 161 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTI PII FIL S C, Concordia standing left, patera in exergue right, cornucopia in left; $600.00 (€522.00)


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Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
SH73705. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III AP1388b; BMCRE IV AP2147; Hunter II p. 300, 30; Cohen II 268; SRCV II 4720, VF, nice style, well centered, flan crack, weight 24.039 g, maximum diameter 35.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 148 - 152 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right with head bare, hair waived and coiled chignon tied with double band of pearls on back of head; reverse VENVS, Venus standing half left, apple in right hand, grounded rudder in left hand, dolphin coiled around rudder, S - C low across field; $600.00 (€522.00)


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Faustina II died in late 175 A.D. in Cappadocia during the imperial trip to the East caused by Cassius' revolt. Although by some sources she can be suspected of infidelity and even participation in that revolt, Marcus deified her and issued commemorative coins such as this one.
RS71383. Silver denarius, RIC III M746, RSC II 75, BMCRE III M725, Szaivert MIR 61, SRCV II 5217, Choice gVF, weight 3.459 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, posthumous, 176 - 180 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right; reverse CONSECRATIO, altar enclosure, door on front; ex Solidus Numismatik e. K.; $140.00 (€121.80)


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Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
SL73988. Silver denarius, RIC III M728; RSC II 249; BMCRE p. 406, M166; Hunter II p. 353, 24; cf. SRCV II 5266 (dove vice apple), NGC Ch VF, strike 5/5, surface 4/5, (4161256-012), weight 3.35 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse VENVS, Venus standing slightly left, head left, apple in extended right hand, long scepter near vertical in left; $135.00 (€117.45)


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Faustina II was daughter, wife and mother of emperors and empresses. When she gave birth to the first of many children she was given the title of Augusta, which for a time made her superior in rank to her husband. She was a devoted wife and mother, and accompanied her husband on all his military campaigns.
RB72334. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III MA1696, MIR 18 52-6/10, BMCRE IV MA1566, Hunter II 18; Cohen III 8, SRCV II 5223, aF, weight 23.658 g, maximum diameter 31.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, 176 - 177 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right; reverse AETERNITAS, Aeternitas seated left on seat without back, feet on stool, phoenix on globe in extended right hand, scepter in left, S - C flanking across field; scarce; $95.00 (€82.65)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Provincial Bronze Brockage

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A brockage occurs when a blank is struck with a previously struck coin which adhered to the opposite die.
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ER62241. Bronze AE 26, Brockage, aVF, weight 10.874 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, Provincial mint, obverse ΦAVCTEINA - CEBACTH, draped bust right, hair in bun behind; reverse incuse of the obverse; $80.00 (€69.60)


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Pudicitia was the personification of modesty and chastity.
RB72340. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC III Pius 1404b, BMCRE IV 2159, Cohen III 187, SRCV II 4732, F, nice portrait, weight 12.970 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 148 - 152 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right, hair with band and a bun at back; reverse PVDICITIA, Pudicitia (modesty and chastity) seated left, right hand holding veil, left resting on lap, S C in exergue; $75.00 (€65.25)


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This type usually has a globe under the throne. The portrait is also a little unusual. It may be an ancient counterfeit; however, there is no indication that it is plated. Perhaps the globe was unstruck due to a filled die or it may have erased by rough cleaning.
RS72189. Silver denarius, cf. RIC III A502a, RSC II 54, BMCRE A1086, SRCV 4704 (all with globe under throne), F, scratches, rough, weight 3.177 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome (or unofficial) mint, c. 154 - 156 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right, hair waved and coiled at the back; reverse CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, flower in extended right, left elbow on cornucopia; $75.00 (€65.25)







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

DIVA AVG FAVSTINA
DIVAE FAVSTINAE PIAE
DIVAE FAVSTIN AVG MATR CASTROR
DIVA FAVSTINA PIA
FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII FIL
FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA AVG PII F
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA AVG PII FIL
FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG F
FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL


REFERENCES

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. III: Vol. 3: Marcus Aurelius to Clodius Albinus. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Szaivert, W. Die Münzprägung der Kaiser Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus un Commodus (161-192). (Wien, 1984).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P.L. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil III: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit Antoninus Pius. (Stuttgart, 1937).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Thursday, July 30, 2015.
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Roman Coins of Faustina Jr.