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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Greek FractionsView Options:  |  |  |   

Greek Silver Fractions

Ionia(?), c. 450 - 350 B.C.

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This type is apparently unpublished and we were unable to find another example. This rosette obverse type is known, paired with a variety of incuse punch reverses for this denomination. Those coins may be earlier issues from the same uncertain mint in Ionia.
GS75854. Silver tetartemorion, Apparently unpublished, VF, rough, weight 0.116 g, maximum diameter 4.8 mm, uncertain Ionian(?) mint, c. 450 - 350 B.C.; obverse rosette; reverse head of bull left; ex Failla Numismatics (2013); $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00
 


Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 380 - 325 B.C.

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The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by King Eurystheus (his cousin), was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. It could not be killed with mortal weapons because its golden fur was impervious to attack. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt, but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt. This type was struck with dozens of different pose variations on the reverse. In some scenes it even appears Herakles might lose. There are so many variations that it may be possible to take the photographs of the reverses and arrange them in a flip book to animate the fight.
GS67287. Silver diobol, Vlasto 1254 ff., HN Italy 914, SGCV I 351, aVF, grainy, small flan, obverse off center, weight 0.749 g, maximum diameter 11.0 mm, die axis 180o, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, c. 380 - 325 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested attic helmet decorated with a hippocamp; reverse TAPANTINΩN(?), young Heracles standing right strangling the Nemean lion, nude, club behind, K between Herakles legs; $85.00 SALE PRICE $76.50
 


Selge, Pisidia, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D. Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths.
GS68737. Silver obol, SNGvA 5266 ff.; SNG BnF 1930; SNG Kayhan 1061; BMC Lycia p. 257, 7; cf. SNG Cop 246 ff. (no tongue); SGCV II 5478, VF, toned, edge chip, weight 0.768 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 45o, Selge mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) with protruding tongue; reverse helmeted head of Athena right, astragalos behind; $85.00 SALE PRICE $76.50
 


Halikarnassos(?), Caria, c. 400 - 340 B.C.

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In Kadmos 37 (1998), K. Konuk identifies Halikarnassos as a possible reading of the ethnic Carian reverse legend. The ram's head may be a symbol of Apollo as the god of flocks and herds.
GS73023. Silver hemiobol, SNG Kayhan 996; SNG Keckman 873; noted in Troxell Carians, weight 0.490 g, maximum diameter 7.6 mm, die axis 0o, Carian mint, c. 400 - 340 B.C; obverse head of ram right; reverse young male head right, ethnic legend across lower fields; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00
 


Kelenderis, Cilicia, 425 - 400 B.C.

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The land around Kelenderis was inadequate for farming but, apparently from the coins, suitable for raising goats. On the plateau behind the hills there were vineyards and olive trees, rich sources of minerals, especially iron and woods, mainly pine and cedar, which were essential for ship building. The town was connected to the Central Anatolian Plateau with suitable passages in the valleys, but it was mainly a port, connected with Cyprus and other countries lying on the Mediterranean coasts.
GS65748. Silver obol, BMC Lycaonia p. 56, 32; Göktürk 6 var. (Pegasos left); SNG BnF -; SNG Levante -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, VF, toned, some porosity, weight 0.797 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 270o, Kelenderis mint, 425 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of Pegasus right, curved wings, circle of dots; reverse KE (upper right), forepart of goat left, head turned back right; ex CNG e-Auction 185, lot 229 (27 Mar 2013); ex Kelly J. Krizan M.D. Collection; CNG Auction 25, lot 362 (24 Mar 1993); very rare; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50
 


Lesbos, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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A most unusual use of illusion on a coin. The two confronting boars' heads can also be viewed as the facing head of a panther.
GA70935. Billon 1/10th stater, BMC Troas p. 151, 14; SNG Cop 287; Traité I, p. 350, 564; SNGvA 7712 var. (no ethnic); SNG München 645 ff. var. (same); Rosen 542 var. (same), VF, dark toning, tight flan, weight 1.264 g, maximum diameter 9.6 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Koinon of Lesbos mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse ΛEΣ (above), confronting boar heads, creating the illusion of a facing head of a panther; reverse incuse square punch; from Matt Kreuzer, ex Mediterranean Coins; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00
 


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 380 - 360 B.C.

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In historical times, Tarsos was first ruled by the Hittites, followed by Assyria, and then the Persian Empire. Tarsus, as the principal town of Cilicia, was the seat of a Persian satrapy from 400 B.C. onward. Indeed, Xenophon records that in 401 B.C., when Cyrus the Younger marched against Babylon, the city was governed by King Syennesis in the name of the Persian monarch. Alexander the Great passed through with his armies in 333 B.C. and nearly met his death here after a bath in the Cydnus. By this time Tarsus was already largely influenced by Greek language and culture, and as part of the Seleucid Empire it became more and more Hellenized. Strabo praises the cultural level of Tarsus in this period with its philosophers, poets and linguists. The schools of Tarsus rivaled those of Athens and Alexandria.
GS58069. Silver obol, SNG BnF 310 - 311, SNG Levante 217 - 218, F, weight 0.458 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, obverse uncertain female head facing slightly left; reverse bust of Aphrodite right, wearing tainia; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50
 


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP74294. Silver hemidrachm, RPC II 1659; Metcalf 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 94; BMC Galatia p. 47, 17; SNGvA 6362, F, encrusted, weight 1.798 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea mint, c. 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse AYOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right; reverse Nike advancing right, wreath in right, palm over shoulder in left; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50
 


Himera, Sicily, c. 530 - 520 B.C.

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After Terillus, tyrant of Himera, was removed, he requested aid from Carthage. Hamilcar landed at Carthagian Panormus with an army of 300,000 men. Himera was just outside the eastern boundary of the Carthaginian-controlled west Sicily, very near Panormus. Himera held its defenses until Gelon of Syracuse arrived with a smaller Greek army. Despite the numerical inferiority, the Greeks defeated the Carthaginians with such slaughter that the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C. was regarded by the Greeks of Sicily as worthy of comparison with the contemporary victory of Salamis. A tradition grew, that both triumphs were achieved on the very same day. The tradition was probably fiction, but the battle did cripple Carthage's power in Sicily for decades.Battle of Himera
GA75658. Silver litra, Kraay Himera pl. 15, 278; SNG ANS 144; cf. BMC Sicily p. 76, 12 (hen); SNG München 339 (obol, hen); HGC 2 427 (R1, obol, hen); SNG Cop -, VF, a little rough, weight 0.668 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, Himera mint, c. 530 - 520 B.C.; obverse cock standing right; reverse square millsail pattern; rare; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50
 


Lesbos, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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A most unusual use of illusion on a coin. The two confronting boars' heads can also be viewed as the facing head of a panther.
GA59008. Billon 1/10th stater, SNGvA 7712, SNG München 645, Rosen 542, Traité 566, SGCV II 3488, SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 1.046 g, maximum diameter 9.2 mm, uncertain Koinon of Lesbos mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse confronting boar heads, creating the illusion of a facing head of a panther; reverse tripartite incuse square punch; $45.00 SALE PRICE $40.50
 




  



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Greek Fractions