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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Greek FractionsView Options:  |  |  |     

Greek Silver Fractions

Halikarnassos(?), Caria, c. 400 - 340 B.C.

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In Kadmos 37 (1998), K. Konuk identifies Halikarnassos as a possible reading of the ethnic Carian reverse legend. The ram's head may be a symbol of Apollo as the god of flocks and herds.
GS73023. Silver hemiobol, SNG Kayhan 996; SNG Keckman 873; noted in Troxell Carians, weight 0.490 g, maximum diameter 7.6 mm, die axis 0o, Carian mint, c. 400 - 340 B.C; obverse head of ram right; reverse young male head right, ethnic legend across lower fields; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00
 


Kelenderis, Cilicia, 410 - 375 B.C.

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The land around Kelenderis was inadequate for farming but, apparently from the coins, suitable for raising goats. On the plateau behind the hills there were vineyards and olive trees, rich sources of minerals, especially iron and woods, mainly pine and cedar, which were essential for ship building. The town was connected to the Central Anatolian Plateau with suitable passages in the valleys, but it was mainly a port, connected with Cyprus and other countries lying on the Mediterranean coasts.
GS71674. Silver obol, SNG BnF 83 (same dies), SNG Delepierre 2838 (same coin), Göktürk 7, SNG Levante 27, SNG Cop 89, SNGvA 5635, gVF, some porosity, marks, weight 0.825 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 90o, Kelenderis mint, 410 - 375 B.C.; obverse forepart of Pegasus right, curved wings, dot border; reverse goat kneeling right, head turned back left, KE upper left; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00
 


Kelenderis, Cilicia, 425 - 400 B.C.

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The land around Kelenderis was inadequate for farming but, apparently from the coins, suitable for raising goats. On the plateau behind the hills there were vineyards and olive trees, rich sources of minerals, especially iron and woods, mainly pine and cedar, which were essential for ship building. The town was connected to the Central Anatolian Plateau with suitable passages in the valleys, but it was mainly a port, connected with Cyprus and other countries lying on the Mediterranean coasts.
GS65748. Silver obol, BMC Lycaonia p. 56, 32; Göktürk 6 var. (Pegasos left); SNG BnF -; SNG Levante -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, VF, toned, some porosity, weight 0.797 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 270o, Kelenderis mint, 425 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of Pegasus right, curved wings, circle of dots; reverse KE (upper right), forepart of goat left, head turned back right; ex CNG e-Auction 185, lot 229 (27 Mar 2013); ex Kelly J. Krizan M.D. Collection; CNG Auction 25, lot 362 (24 Mar 1993); very rare; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50
 


Lesbos, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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A most unusual use of illusion on a coin. The two confronting boars' heads can also be viewed as the facing head of a panther.
GA70935. Billon 1/10th stater, BMC Troas p. 151, 14; SNG Cop 287; Traité I, p. 350, 564; SNGvA 7712 var. (no ethnic); SNG München 645 ff. var. (same); Rosen 542 var. (same), VF, dark toning, tight flan, weight 1.264 g, maximum diameter 9.6 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Koinon of Lesbos mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse ΛEΣ (above), confronting boar heads, creating the illusion of a facing head of a panther; reverse incuse square punch; from Matt Kreuzer, ex Mediterranean Coins; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00
 


Kelenderis, Cilicia, c. 425 - 400 B.C.

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The land around Kelenderis was inadequate for farming but, apparently from the coins, suitable for raising goats. On the plateau behind the hills there were vineyards and olive trees, rich sources of minerals, especially iron and woods, mainly pine and cedar, which were essential for ship building. The town was connected to the Central Anatolian Plateau with suitable passages in the valleys, but it was mainly a port, connected with Cyprus and other countries lying on the Mediterranean coasts.
GS90735. Silver obol, SNG BnF 80; SNG Levante 27; BMC Lycaonia p. 56, 30; SNGvA 5635; SNG Cop 88; Weber 7523 (S RCV 5536), VF, well centered, toned, weight 0.765 g, maximum diameter 9.6 mm, die axis 90o, Kelenderis mint, c. 425 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of Pegasos right with curved wing; reverse KE−Λ, goat kneeling right, head turned back left; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00
 


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 380 - 360 B.C.

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In historical times, Tarsos was first ruled by the Hittites, followed by Assyria, and then the Persian Empire. Tarsus, as the principal town of Cilicia, was the seat of a Persian satrapy from 400 B.C. onward. Indeed, Xenophon records that in 401 B.C., when Cyrus the Younger marched against Babylon, the city was governed by King Syennesis in the name of the Persian monarch. Alexander the Great passed through with his armies in 333 B.C. and nearly met his death here after a bath in the Cydnus. By this time Tarsus was already largely influenced by Greek language and culture, and as part of the Seleucid Empire it became more and more Hellenized. Strabo praises the cultural level of Tarsus in this period with its philosophers, poets and linguists. The schools of Tarsus rivaled those of Athens and Alexandria.
GS58069. Silver obol, SNG BnF 310 - 311, SNG Levante 217 - 218, F, weight 0.458 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, obverse uncertain female head facing slightly left; reverse bust of Aphrodite right, wearing tainia; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50
 


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP74294. Silver hemidrachm, RPC II 1659; Metcalf 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 94; BMC Galatia p. 47, 17; SNGvA 6362, F, encrusted, weight 1.798 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea mint, c. 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse AYOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right; reverse Nike advancing right, wreath in right, palm over shoulder in left; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50
 


Himera, Sicily, c. 530 - 520 B.C.

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After Terillus, tyrant of Himera, was removed, he requested aid from Carthage. Hamilcar landed at Carthagian Panormus with an army of 300,000 men. Himera was just outside the eastern boundary of the Carthaginian-controlled west Sicily, very near Panormus. Himera held its defenses until Gelon of Syracuse arrived with a smaller Greek army. Despite the numerical inferiority, the Greeks defeated the Carthaginians with such slaughter that the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C. was regarded by the Greeks of Sicily as worthy of comparison with the contemporary victory of Salamis. A tradition grew, that both triumphs were achieved on the very same day. The tradition was probably fiction, but the battle did cripple Carthage's power in Sicily for decades.Battle of Himera
GA75658. Silver litra, Kraay Himera pl. 15, 278; SNG ANS 144; cf. BMC Sicily p. 76, 12 (hen); SNG München 339 (obol, hen); HGC 2 427 (R1, obol, hen); SNG Cop -, VF, a little rough, weight 0.668 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, Himera mint, c. 530 - 520 B.C.; obverse cock standing right; reverse square millsail pattern; rare; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50
 


Istros, Thrace, 400 - 350 B.C.

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The obverse type has been variously interpreted as representing the Dioscuri, the rising and setting sun, and the two branches of the river Danube. - Greek Coins and Their Values by David Sear
GS76744. Silver 1/4 drachm, SNG BM Black Sea 250; BMC Thrace p. 26, 14; cf. SNG Stancomb 143 (control off flan, trihemiobol), F, struck with worn dies, weight 0.850 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, Istros (near Istria, Romania) mint, 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse facing male heads, right inverted; reverse IΣTPIH, sea-eagle grasping a dolphin with talons, ΠA monogram below; $48.67 (€43.32)


Lesbos, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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A most unusual use of illusion on a coin. The two confronting boars' heads can also be viewed as the facing head of a panther.
GA59008. Billon 1/10th stater, SNGvA 7712, SNG München 645, Rosen 542, Traité 566, SGCV II 3488, SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 1.046 g, maximum diameter 9.2 mm, uncertain Koinon of Lesbos mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse confronting boar heads, creating the illusion of a facing head of a panther; reverse tripartite incuse square punch; $45.00 SALE PRICE $40.50
 




    



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Greek Fractions