Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Please login or register to view your wish list! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Please login or register to view your wish list! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Greek FractionsView Options:  |  |  |     

Greek Silver Fractions

Halikarnassos(?), Caria, c. 400 - 340 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In Kadmos 37 (1998), K. Konuk identifies Halikarnassos as a possible reading of the ethnic Carian reverse legend. The ram head may be a symbol of Apollo as the god of flocks and herds.
GA72261. Silver hemiobol, SNG Keckman 873 (uncertain mint), SNG Kayhan 996, Klein 496, SNG Tübingen 3316, SNG München -, SNG Cop -, VF, weight 0.507 g, maximum diameter 8.6 mm, die axis 270o, Carian mint, c. 400 - 340 B.C; obverse head of ram right; reverse young male head right, retrograde ethnic legend (resembles reversed S-A) across lower fields; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Kebren, Troas, c. 480 - 450 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cebren was named for the river-god, whose river was located near Troy. He was the son of Oceanus and Tethys and father of Asterope, Hesperia, and Oenone. Around 310 B.C., Antigonus moved the residents of Cebren to Alexandria Troas, his new city.
GA71662. Silver diobol, cf. SNG Cop 254; SNGvA 1544; SNG Ashmolean 1078; BMC Troas p. 43, 7, VF, toned, nice style, tight flan, weight 0.951 g, maximum diameter 9.4 mm, Kebren mint, c. 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse ram head right, KEBP below; reverse incuse square with an irregular quadripartite/cruciform pattern; rare; $105.00 (€93.45)
 


Persian Achaeminid Empire, Carian Satrapy, Hecatomnids, c. 392 - 353 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The Hecatomnid dynasty or Hecatomnids were the rulers of Caria and surrounding areas from about 392 - 334 B.C. They were nominally satraps (governors) under the Persian Achaeminid Empire, but ruled with considerable autonomy, and established a hereditary dynasty. The dynasty was founded by Hecatomnus and originally had its seat in Mylasa; Mausolus moved it to Halicarnassus. Hecatomnus' five children succeeded him in succession. The dynasty engaged in sibling marriage to presumably preserve royal power within the family. The dynasty ended with the conquests of Alexander the Great. Ada adopted him as her son, so that he would succeed to the rule of Caria. The best-known monument of the dynasty is the Mausoleum that Artemisia II built in honor of her husband and brother Mausolus.
Hecatomnus, ruled c. 392–377 B.C.
Mausolus, son of Hecatomnus, ruled c. 377–353 B.C.
• Artemisia II, daughter of Hecatomnus, wife of Mausolus, ruled c. 353–351 B.C.
• Idrieus, son of Hecatomnus, ruled c. 351–344 B.C.
• Ada, daughter of Hecatomnus, wife of Idrieus, ruled c. 344–340 B.C. and c. 334–326 B.C. (under Alexander the Great)
• Pixodarus, son of Hecatomnus, ruled c. 340–335 B.C.
GS70805. Silver tetartemorion, Troxell Carians 4, SNG Keckman 862, Klein 503, cf. SNG Kayhan 990 (no inscription), SNG Turkey VIII -, SNG Cop -, F, toned, weight 0.430 g, maximum diameter 8.2 mm, die axis 180o, Caria (Mylasia? or Halicarnassus?) mint, early to mid 4th century B.C.; obverse head and neck of a lion left, head turned slightly facing; reverse head and neck of a bull left, head turned facing, Karian inscription (resembles MV-H-Φ, clockwise from above), all within a round incuse; rare; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Persian Empire, Sidon, Phoenicia, Ba'Alshillem II, c. 401 - 366 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Sidon, named for the "first-born" of Canaan, the grandson of Noah (Genesis 10:15, 19), is frequently referred to by the prophets (Isaiah 23:2, 4, 12; Jeremiah 25:22; 27:3; 47:4; Ezekiel 27:8; 28:21, 22; 32:30; Joel 3:4). The Sidonians long oppressed Israel (Judges 10:12) but Solomon entered into a matrimonial alliance with them, and thus their form of idolatrous worship found a place in the land of Israel (1 Kings 11:1, 33). Jesus visited the "coasts" of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24) where many came to hear him preach (Mark 3:8; Luke 6:17). After leaving Caesarea, Paul's ship put in at Sidon, before finally sailing for Rome (Acts 27:3, 4).
GS70324. Silver 1/16 shekel, Elayi 2004 851 ff.; Hoover 10 240; Betlyon 27 (Abd'astart, Straton I); BMC Phoenicia p 146, 36 (same); SNG Cop 197 ff. (same), VF, tight flan, toned, lightly etched surfaces, weight 0.841 g, maximum diameter 9.45 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, c. 371 - 370 B.C.; obverse war galley left, Phoenician letter beth above; reverse King of Persia (to left) standing right, slaying erect lion to right, Phoenician letter ayin between them; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Ziz (Panormos), Punic Sicily, c. 405 - 380 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Some authorities have identified the male head on the obverse as Apollo. Indeed, on some examples the head does resemble other depictions of the youthful sun god, but on other examples the god is horned. On this coin the head seems to better resemble traditional depictions of Herakles or Baal. The type usually has the Punic ethnic above the bull. Sometimes it is below. Most likely it should be above on this coin but is merely unstruck.
GS66771. Silver obol, cf. Jenkins Punic (SNR 50) 14; BMC Sicily p. 249, 27; SNG ANS 551; SGCV I 889 (all w/ Punic ethnic "sys" above bull), aVF, weight 0.547 g, maximum diameter 9.14 mm, die axis 45o, Ziz (Palermo, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 405 - 380 B.C.; obverse male head left; reverse Man-faced bull advancing left, head turned facing; $95.00 (€84.55)
 


Leontini, Sicily, c. 476 - 455 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Leontini was founded by colonists from Naxos in 729 B.C. Six miles inland, it is the only Greek settlement in Sicily not located on the coast, Originally held by the Sicels, the site was seized by the Greeks to gain control of the fertile plain to the north.
GS67480. Silver hemilitra, SNG München 548; Boehringer Leontini B; cf. HGC 2 688 (R2, obol); SNG ANS 216 (obol, finer style); BMC Sicily p. 88, 22 (same); SNG Cop 342 (same), VF, weight 0.282 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 225o, Leontini (or unofficial?) mint, c. 476 - 466 B.C.; obverse crude facing lion scalp, dot border; reverse LE/ON (retrograde), barley grain, within shallow round incuse; very rare; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Ionia(?), c. 450 - 350 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This type is apparently unpublished and we were unable to find another example. This rosette obverse type is known, paired with a variety of incuse punch reverses for this denomination. Those coins may be earlier issues from the same uncertain mint in Ionia.
GS75854. Silver tetartemorion, Apparently unpublished, VF, rough, weight 0.116 g, maximum diameter 4.8 mm, uncertain Ionian(?) mint, c. 450 - 350 B.C.; obverse rosette; reverse head of bull left; ex Failla Numismatics (2013); $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 380 - 325 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by King Eurystheus (his cousin), was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. It could not be killed with mortal weapons because its golden fur was impervious to attack. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt, but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt. This type was struck with dozens of different pose variations on the reverse. In some scenes it even appears Herakles might lose. There are so many variations that it may be possible to take the photographs of the reverses and arrange them in a flip book to animate the fight.
GS67287. Silver diobol, Vlasto 1254 ff., HN Italy 914, SGCV I 351, aVF, grainy, small flan, obverse off center, weight 0.749 g, maximum diameter 11.0 mm, die axis 180o, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, c. 380 - 325 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested attic helmet decorated with a hippocamp; reverse TAPANTINΩN(?), young Heracles standing right strangling the Nemean lion, nude, club behind, K between Herakles legs; $85.00 (€75.65)
 


Selge, Pisidia, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprücay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D. Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths.
GS68737. Silver obol, SNGvA 5266 ff.; SNG BnF 1930; SNG Kayhan 1061; BMC Lycia p. 257, 7; cf. SNG Cop 246 ff. (no tongue); SGCV II 5478, VF, toned, edge chip, weight 0.768 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 45o, Selge mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) with protruding tongue; reverse helmeted head of Athena right, astragalos behind; $85.00 (€75.65)
 


Halikarnassos(?), Caria, c. 400 - 340 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In Kadmos 37 (1998), K. Konuk identifies Halikarnassos as a possible reading of the ethnic Carian reverse legend. The ram's head may be a symbol of Apollo as the god of flocks and herds.
GS73023. Silver hemiobol, SNG Kayhan 996; SNG Keckman 873; noted in Troxell Carians, weight 0.490 g, maximum diameter 7.6 mm, die axis 0o, Carian mint, c. 400 - 340 B.C; obverse head of ram right; reverse young male head right, ethnic legend across lower fields; $80.00 (€71.20)
 




    



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 27, 2016.
Page created in 2.854 seconds
Greek Fractions