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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Greek FractionsView Options:  |  |  |     

Greek Silver Fractions

Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, c. 519 - 478 B.C.

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Apollonia Pontica was founded as Antheia by Greek colonists from Miletus in the 7th century B.C. They soon changed its name to Apollonia after building a temple for Apollo. The temple contained a colossal statue of Apollo by Calamis, which was later taken to Rome and placed in the Capitol. The anchor on the coinage is evidence of the importance of its maritime trade.
GA64065. Silver hemiobol, Topalov Apollonia p. 570, 6; SNG Stancomb 32; SNG BM 149, VF, grainy, weight 0.417 g, maximum diameter 6.8 mm, die axis 90o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, c. 519 - 478 B.C.; obverse anchor with perpendicular crossbar and circular loop on end, two pellets; reverse incuse curled swastika pattern; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Halikarnassos(?), Caria, c. 400 - 340 B.C.

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In Kadmos 37 (1998), K. Konuk identifies Halikarnassos as a possible reading of the ethnic Carian reverse legend. The ram head may be a symbol of Apollo as the god of flocks and herds.
GA72261. Silver hemiobol, SNG Keckman 873 (uncertain mint), SNG Kayhan 996, Klein 496, SNG Tübingen 3316, SNG München -, SNG Cop -, VF, weight 0.507 g, maximum diameter 8.6 mm, die axis 270o, Carian mint, c. 400 - 340 B.C; obverse head of ram right; reverse young male head right, retrograde ethnic legend (resembles reversed S-A) across lower fields; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 480 - 400 B.C.

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Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GA71821. Silver hemiobol, SNG BnF 386; SNGvA 1215, SNG Ashmolean 540, Von Fritze II 13, SNG Kayhan -, aEF, porous, weight 0.399 g, maximum diameter 9.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 480 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, retrograde K on shoulder, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse head of roaring lion left, small facing panther head above left, all within a shallow incuse square; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Lamia, Thessaly, Greece, 400 - 344 B.C.

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Lamia has been inhabited since at least the 3rd millennium B.C., but the first historical mention is after an earthquake in 424 B.C., when it was an important Spartan military base. The city held a strategic location, controlling the narrow coastal plain that connected southern Greece with Thessaly and the rest of the Balkans. It was therefore fortified in the 5th century B.C., and was contested by the Macedonians, Thessalians and Aetolians until the Roman conquest in the early 2nd century B.C.
GS75127. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 77; BCD Thessaly 1089; BCD Thessaly II 123; Traité IV 457 & pl. CCLXXXVII, 20; BMC Thessaly p. 22, 2; Georgiou Lamia 6, VF, toned, scratches, weight 2.429 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 345o, Lamia mint, 400 - 344 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos left, wearing ivy wreath; reverse ΛAMIE−ΩN, amphora with two handles, ivy leaf above, prochous with handle lower right, all within shallow round incuse; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 12 (1 Nov 2014), lot 266; ex Frank James Collection; ex William Holzman (1962); $110.00 (€97.90) ON RESERVE


Kebren, Troas, c. 480 - 450 B.C.

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Cebren was named for the river-god, whose river was located near Troy. He was the son of Oceanus and Tethys and father of Asterope, Hesperia, and Oenone. Around 310 B.C., Antigonus moved the residents of Cebren to Alexandria Troas, his new city.
GA71662. Silver diobol, cf. SNG Cop 254; SNGvA 1544; SNG Ashmolean 1078; BMC Troas p. 43, 7, VF, toned, nice style, tight flan, weight 0.951 g, maximum diameter 9.4 mm, Kebren mint, c. 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse ram head right, KEBP below; reverse incuse square with an irregular quadripartite/cruciform pattern; rare; $105.00 (€93.45)
 


Persian Achaeminid Empire, Carian Satrapy, Hecatomnids, c. 392 - 353 B.C.

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The Hecatomnid dynasty or Hecatomnids were the rulers of Caria and surrounding areas from about 392 - 334 B.C. They were nominally satraps (governors) under the Persian Achaeminid Empire, but ruled with considerable autonomy, and established a hereditary dynasty. The dynasty was founded by Hecatomnus and originally had its seat in Mylasa; Mausolus moved it to Halicarnassus. Hecatomnus' five children succeeded him in succession. The dynasty engaged in sibling marriage to presumably preserve royal power within the family. The dynasty ended with the conquests of Alexander the Great. Ada adopted him as her son, so that he would succeed to the rule of Caria. The best-known monument of the dynasty is the Mausoleum that Artemisia II built in honor of her husband and brother Mausolus.
Hecatomnus, ruled c. 392–377 B.C.
Mausolus, son of Hecatomnus, ruled c. 377–353 B.C.
• Artemisia II, daughter of Hecatomnus, wife of Mausolus, ruled c. 353–351 B.C.
• Idrieus, son of Hecatomnus, ruled c. 351–344 B.C.
• Ada, daughter of Hecatomnus, wife of Idrieus, ruled c. 344–340 B.C. and c. 334–326 B.C. (under Alexander the Great)
• Pixodarus, son of Hecatomnus, ruled c. 340–335 B.C.
GS70805. Silver tetartemorion, Troxell Carians 4, SNG Keckman 862, Klein 503, cf. SNG Kayhan 990 (no inscription), SNG Turkey VIII -, SNG Cop -, F, toned, weight 0.430 g, maximum diameter 8.2 mm, die axis 180o, Caria (Mylasia? or Halicarnassus?) mint, early to mid 4th century B.C.; obverse head and neck of a lion left, head turned slightly facing; reverse head and neck of a bull left, head turned facing, Karian inscription (resembles MV-H-Φ, clockwise from above), all within a round incuse; rare; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Persian Empire, Sidon, Phoenicia, Ba'Alshillem II, c. 401 - 366 B.C.

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Sidon, named for the "first-born" of Canaan, the grandson of Noah (Genesis 10:15, 19), is frequently referred to by the prophets (Isaiah 23:2, 4, 12; Jeremiah 25:22; 27:3; 47:4; Ezekiel 27:8; 28:21, 22; 32:30; Joel 3:4). The Sidonians long oppressed Israel (Judges 10:12) but Solomon entered into a matrimonial alliance with them, and thus their form of idolatrous worship found a place in the land of Israel (1 Kings 11:1, 33). Jesus visited the "coasts" of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24) where many came to hear him preach (Mark 3:8; Luke 6:17). After leaving Caesarea, Paul's ship put in at Sidon, before finally sailing for Rome (Acts 27:3, 4).
GS70324. Silver 1/16 shekel, Elayi 2004 851 ff.; Hoover 10 240; Betlyon 27 (Abd'astart, Straton I); BMC Phoenicia p 146, 36 (same); SNG Cop 197 ff. (same), VF, tight flan, toned, lightly etched surfaces, weight 0.841 g, maximum diameter 9.45 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, c. 371 - 370 B.C.; obverse war galley left, Phoenician letter beth above; reverse King of Persia (to left) standing right, slaying erect lion to right, Phoenician letter ayin between them; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Ziz (Panormos), Punic Sicily, c. 405 - 380 B.C.

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Some authorities have identified the male head on the obverse as Apollo. Indeed, on some examples the head does resemble other depictions of the youthful sun god, but on other examples the god is horned. On this coin the head seems to better resemble traditional depictions of Herakles or Baal. The type usually has the Punic ethnic above the bull. Sometimes it is below. Most likely it should be above on this coin but is merely unstruck.
GS66771. Silver obol, cf. Jenkins Punic (SNR 50) 14; BMC Sicily p. 249, 27; SNG ANS 551; SGCV I 889 (all w/ Punic ethnic "sys" above bull), aVF, weight 0.547 g, maximum diameter 9.14 mm, die axis 45o, Ziz (Palermo, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 405 - 380 B.C.; obverse male head left; reverse Man-faced bull advancing left, head turned facing; $95.00 (€84.55)
 


Leontini, Sicily, c. 476 - 455 B.C.

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Leontini was founded by colonists from Naxos in 729 B.C. Six miles inland, it is the only Greek settlement in Sicily not located on the coast, Originally held by the Sicels, the site was seized by the Greeks to gain control of the fertile plain to the north.
GS67480. Silver hemilitra, SNG München 548; Boehringer Leontini B; cf. HGC 2 688 (R2, obol); SNG ANS 216 (obol, finer style); BMC Sicily p. 88, 22 (same); SNG Cop 342 (same), VF, weight 0.282 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 225o, Leontini (or unofficial?) mint, c. 476 - 466 B.C.; obverse crude facing lion scalp, dot border; reverse LE/ON (retrograde), barley grain, within shallow round incuse; very rare; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Ionia(?), c. 450 - 350 B.C.

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This type is apparently unpublished and we were unable to find another example. This rosette obverse type is known, paired with a variety of incuse punch reverses for this denomination. Those coins may be earlier issues from the same uncertain mint in Ionia.
GS75854. Silver tetartemorion, Apparently unpublished, VF, rough, weight 0.116 g, maximum diameter 4.8 mm, uncertain Ionian(?) mint, c. 450 - 350 B.C.; obverse rosette; reverse head of bull left; ex Failla Numismatics (2013); $90.00 (€80.10)
 




    



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Catalog current as of Wednesday, August 24, 2016.
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Greek Fractions