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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Judean & Biblical Coins ▸ Herodian Dynasty ▸ Herod the GreatView Options:  |  |  | 

Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

A Roman citizen, Herod took the throne of Judaea with Roman assistance. "Now when they had departed, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, "Rise, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt, and remain there till I tell you; for Herod is about to search for the child, to destroy Him." (Matthew 2:13 RSV)


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The eight prutot was Herod's largest denomination. The style of this scarcer variety is somewhat schematic. The vertical legends are also unusual. This is an appendage group type (O2/R3) as discussed in the Feb '05 Celator.
SH08332. Copper 8 prutot, Hendin 1169, Meshorer AJC 1a, MCP O-I-04, Fontanille Celator Feb '05 O2/R3, VF, weight 10.14 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria mint, 40 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (of King Herod), in 3 strait lines, tripod, ceremonial bowl (lebes) above, LΓ - P (year 3 of the tetrarchy = 40 B.C.) across fields; reverse military helmet facing with cheek pieces and straps, wreathed with acanthus leaves, fillets and star above, flanked by two palm-branches; areas not fully struck, nice green patina highlighted by buff earthen fill; scarce; SOLD


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Very rare in this condition with such a bold strike.
SH26930. Bronze two prutot, Meshorer TJC 46, Hendin 1171, Choice VF, weight 3.146 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria mint, 40 - 37 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, winged caduceus, date LΓ on left and monogram P on right; reverse poppy pod on stem with leaves, fillet left and right; rare; SOLD


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The decoration on the helmet was not present on all dies. On those coins struck with these details, the decoration has only rarely survived wear and corrosion. The decoration on this specimen, which is quite bold and sharp for the type, appears to be two ivy leaves.
SH13111. Copper eight prutot, Hendin 1169, Meshorer TJC 44, Meshorer AJC II 1, gVF, weight 7.05 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 45o, Samaria mint, 40 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (of King Herod), tripod, ceremonial bowl (lebes) above, LΓ - P (year 3 of the tetrarchy = 40 B.C.) across fields; reverse military helmet facing, decorated with ivy?, with cheek pieces and straps, wreathed with acanthus leaves, star above, flanked by two palm-branches; rare in this condition; SOLD







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SYMBOLS ON HEROD'S COINS

Acanthus leaves A common plant of the Mediterranean, whose stylized leaves form the characteristic decoration on Corinthian and Composite capitals. The acanthus leaves may have symbolized the arts or steadfastness, or perhaps they were just decorative.

The Anchor: The anchor was adopted from the Selukids, who used it to symbolize their naval strength. Anchors are depicted upside down, as they would be seen hung on the side of a boat ready for use.

The Caduceus: The caduceus is the wing-topped staff, with two snakes winding about it, carried by Hermes. According to one myth it was given to him by Apollo. The caduceus was carried by Greek heralds and ambassadors and became a Roman symbol for truce, neutrality, and noncombatant status. Herod was a friend to Rome and the caduceus was an appropriate symbol in that regard.

The Cornucopia: The cornucopia was a hollow animal horn used as a container. One of the most popular religious symbols of the ancient world, the cornucopia is also know as the "horn of plenty."

The Cross: The cross found on coins of Herod the Great is actually the letter "chi," which symbolized the power of the High Priest. Since Herod was not the High Priest, his use of this symbol was probably intended to reinforce his control of the Temple through "his" High Priest.

The Diadem: The diadem symbolized royalty.

The Grape and Grape Vine: Grapes, the vine and wine were an important part of the ancient economy and ritual. Grapes were brought to the Temple as offerings of the first-fruits and wine was offered upon the altar. The vine and grapes decorated the sacred vessels in the sanctuary and a golden vine with clusters of grapes stood at its entrance.

The Pomegranate: The pomegranate was one of the seven celebrated products of Palestine and among the fruits brought to the temple as offerings of the first-fruits. Two hundred pomegranates decorated each of the two columns in the temple and were an integral part of the sacred vestment of the High Priest, as bells and pomegranates were suspended from his mantle.

The Star: The star symbolize heaven.


Catalog current as of Tuesday, August 30, 2016.
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Herod the Great