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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman ProvincialView Options:  |  |  |     

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The Lighthouse of Alexandria, also called the Pharos, built by the Ptolemaic Kingdom between 280 and 247 B.C., was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Between 393 and 450 feet (120 - 140 m) tall, it was one of the tallest man-made structures on Earth for many centuries. Damaged by three earthquakes between 956 and 1323, it then became an abandoned ruin. It was the third longest surviving ancient wonder (after the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus and the still extant Great Pyramid of Giza), until in 1480 the last of its remnant stones were used to build the Citadel of Qaitbay on the site. In 1994, French archaeologists discovered some remains of the lighthouse on the floor of Alexandria's Eastern Harbor.
RX86722. Bronze drachm, Dattari 1765, Milne 1373, SNG Cop 375, Kampmann 32.547, Emmett 1002/17, Geissen -, BMC Alexandria -, SNG Milan -, aF/aVF, well centered, corrosion but mostly on obverse, most of obverse legend obliterated, weight 22.681 g, maximum diameter 34.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 132 - 28 Aug 133 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAI(AN) A∆PIA(NOC) CEB, laureate and draped bust right,; reverse Isis Pharia standing right, sistrum in extended right hand, holding a billowing sail with both hands and left foot, sailing toward the Pharos (lighthouse) of Alexandria, which is surmounted by a statue and two Tritons, each blowing a buccinum (sea shell trumpet); L IZ (year 17) above center; Emmett lists this highly desirable year 17 type as common but there are none on coin archives and it is missing from Cologne, London, and Milan; however, year 18 is common; $350.00 (€297.50)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Struck at Rome for use in Syria

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In 115, Trajan was in Antioch for his war against Parthia, when the city was struck by an earthquake. He was forced to take shelter in the circus for several days. He and his successor restored the city.
RY86797. Orichalcum semis, Woytek 938b (same obv. die), McAlee 516, BMCRE III 1100, RPC Online III 3675 (5 Spec.), RIC II 645, Strack 479, Choice gVF, brown tone with scattered brassy areas, light marks and scratches, scratch on neck, weight 5.148 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 116 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GERM, radiate and draped bust right, from the side; reverse DAC PARTHICO P M TR POT XX COS VI P P, large S C in oak wreath; $340.00 (€289.00)


Olba, Cilicia Tracheia, Marcus Antonius Polemo, King, c. 64 - 74 A.D.

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All three references listed, refer to the exact same coin, plus RPC identifies a second example. We were unable to find another, making this is only the third specimen of this type known to Forum. In 63 A.D., the Pontic part of the Polemon lands was made part of Roman Galatia. Sometime afterward, Marcus Antonius Polemo (III?) ruled as king over part of Cilicia including Olbia and, from this coin, also Lalassis and Kennatis. In the late 60's, he struck coins as king with portraits of Nero and Galba. RPC I notes similarity between this coin type and a Domitian caesar type and dates this coin early in the Flavian period. Certainly it dates before 74 A.D. when Vespasian absorbed part of Cilicia Tracheia, likely including Lalassis and Kennatis, into Roman Cilicia.
GB85938. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 3742, SNG Levante 644, Staffieri Olba 36, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Lycaonia -, VF, green patina, very light marks, earthen deposits and corrosion, some legend weak, reverse off center, weight 2.873 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Cilicia, Olba mint, c. 70 A.D.; obverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ M ANT ΠOΛEMΩNOΣ, club; reverse KOINON ΛAΛAΣΣEΩN KAI KENNATΩN, harpa on globe; only the 3rd known to Forum; extremely rare; $320.00 (€272.00)


Melita, Malta, c. 150 - 146 B.C.

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Melite or Melita (present-day Mdina) Malta began as a Bronze Age settlement, which grew into the city Maleth under the Phoenicians, and became the administrative center of the island. The city fell to Rome in 218 B.C., and it remained part of the Roman and later the Byzantine Empire until 870 A.D., when it was destroyed by the Aghlabids. The city was then rebuilt and renamed Medina, giving rise to the present name Mdina. It remained Malta's capital city until 1530. Only a few vestiges of the Punic-Roman city have survived. The most substantial are the ruins of the Domvs Romana, an aristocratic town house, in which a number of well-preserved mosaics and statues have been found. Sparse remains of other buildings and parts of the city walls have been excavated, but no visible remains of the city's numerous temples, churches, and other public buildings survive.
GI86525. Bronze AE 26, Calciati III p. 353, 7; SNG Cop VIII 463; SNG Dreer 607; Coleiro 3, F, red-black patina, reverse a little off center, light marks and corrosion, weight 12.228 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Melita (Mdina, Malta) mint, under Roman rule, c. 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse MEΛITAIΩN (clockwise on right), head of Isis (Coleiro says Astarte) left, wearing uraeus crown, composite of symbol of Tanit and caduceus in left field; reverse Osiris kneeling left on left knee, with four open wings, wearing double crown, short scepter in right hand, flail in left hand; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $300.00 (€255.00)


Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Hadrian refounded a Thracian tribal capital, changed its name to Hadrianopolis, developed it, adorned it with monuments, and made it the capital of the Roman province. The city is Edirne, Turkey today. From ancient times, the area around Edirne has been the site of no fewer than 16 major battles or sieges. Military historian John Keegan identifies it as "the most contested spot on the globe" and attributes this to its geographical location. Licinius was defeated there by Constantine I in 323, and Valens was killed by the Goths during the Battle of Adrianople in 378.
SH65237. Bronze AE 25, Jurukova p. 157 & pl. XXII, 244 (V137/R244); Mionnet, Suppl. II, 658; BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, VF, green patina, weight 7.837 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 180o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse IOYΛIA ∆O CEBACTH, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, looped plait below ear and on neck; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, galley left with four oarsmen and steersman in stern; very rare; $280.00 (€238.00)


Byblos (Gebal), Phoenicia, 62 - 60 B.C.

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Byblos was strongly influenced by Egyptian art, culture and religion. In Egyptian myth, Byblos is where Isis found the body of her dead husband in the trunk of a tree which had grown around him after he was murdered by his brother Set. In Pharaonic times, Isis had nothing to do with the sea, and it was Hathor who protected sailors. The Greeks syncretized the two goddesses resulting in Isis Pelagia, mistress of the sea and protector of sailors.

Most recent studies conclude this type is dated to the Pompeian Era. Many older studies listed it as Actian Era, 28 - 27 B.C. RPC also notes the possibility that it is dated the third regnal year of Nero, 56 - 57 A.D.
GB87104. Bronze AE 25, Imhoof-Blumer MG p. 443, 23; Rouvier 670; SNG Righetti 2257; De Clercq p. 18 & pl. IV, 340; SNRIS Byblus 10 (7 spec.); RPC I -; Cohen DCA -, VF, overstruck, weight 8.395 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 45o, Byblos (Jbail, Lebanon) mint, 62 - 61 B.C. or 61 - 60 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse (Phoenician: of Gebal the Holy), Isis Pelagia standing right on a barge, wearing crown and long chiton, a sail swollen by the wind held under foot and with both hands, L - Γ (year 3 [Pompeian Era]) flanking head, large (Byblos monogram) behind; very rare; $280.00 (€238.00)


Roman Hispania, Hacksilver Lot of 12 Cut Silver Coin Fragments, c. Before 50 B.C.

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Hacksilver lot of 12 cut silver coin fragments, reputedly all found in southern Spain. One Carthago Nova, cut 1/5 or 1/4 portion of a Hannibal shekel, 1.43g, cf. SNG BM 106 - 109, rare. Eleven cut fractions of Roman Republican denarii, mostly c. early 2nd century B.C.
LT87284. Silver fragment, cut fraction of a Hannibal shekel, plus 11 cut Republican denarii fragments, average VF, no tags or flips, the actual coin fragments in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $280.00 (€238.00)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

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On 11 February 244, Emperor Gordian III was murdered by mutinous soldiers in Zaitha (Mesopotamia). Philip the Arab (Marcus Julius Philippus) declared himself emperor and made a disgraceful peace with the Sasanian Empire, withdrawing from their territory and giving Shapur 500,000 gold pieces. The Sasanians occupied Armenia. Philip was recognized by the Roman Senate as Emperor and he nominated his son Philippus, age 6, as Caesar and heir to the throne. He gave his brother Priscus supreme power (rector Orientis) in the Eastern provinces; and began construction of the city of Shahba, Syria in the province of his birth.
RY85323. Billon tetradrachm, Prieur 321 (1 spec.); McAlee 889 (v. rare); BMC Galatia p. 212, 505, EF, sharp attractive portrait, attractive iridescent toning, parts of legends weak, areas of some porosity, weight 13.256 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 1st issue, 244 A.D.; obverse AVTOK K M IOV Λ ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust left, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing slightly left on palm frond, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; very rare; $270.00 (€229.50)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS82776. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, 1524 (O DE1/ R 1206); Lukanc 270 (same dies); SNG Ashmolean V 3699 (same rev. die, Thasos), VF, attractive Dionysos, light toning, bumps and marks, die wear, slight bend to flan, weight 16.592 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, H inner left; $270.00 (€229.50)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS82778. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, monogram 2, 1299 (O DD11 / R 1051); SNG Cop 1040 ff. (Thasos), VF, nice style, light toning, bumps and scratches, die wear, weight 16.72 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, M monogram inner left; $270.00 (€229.50)




    



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Catalog current as of Thursday, June 21, 2018.
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Roman Coins of Roman Provincial