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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman ProvincialView Options:  |  |  |     

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.

Pontus (Amisos?), Roman Quaestor (Lucius Lucullus?), c. 100 - 50 B.C.

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The Q identifies the bare male head as a Roman Quaestor. This letter is not noted in RPC but is visible here and clear on other examples known to Forum. Perhaps the image is of Lucius Lucullus, an important Quaestor of Sulla, about whom Plutarch wrote. The reverse legend, the Latin FETIA, refers to the fetial ceremony, part of the treaty making process, during which a pig was sacrificed to sanctify the oaths. The mint location is unknown but Imhoof-Blumer placed it at Amisus, where Leypold acquired his specimen.
SH71045. Brass AE 20, RPC I 2156, SNG Leypold I p. 24, 69; Imhoof-Blumer GRMK 281, VF/F, weight 6.826 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pontus (Amisos (Samsun, Turkey)?) mint, c. 80 B.C.(?); obverse bare male head right, Q (quaestor) below; reverse two men standing, holding a pig between them, each with a hand raised, taking an oath of fealty, FETA IA in exergue; rare; $430.00 (€378.40)

Tetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Lysanias, 40 - 36 B.C.

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Lysanias is called Tetrarch of Abila by Josephus. Lysanias' father Ptolemaios was married to Alexandra, Mattathias Antigonus' sister. Lysanias offered the Parthian satrap Barzapharnes a thousand talents and 500 women to depose Hyrcanus and put his uncle (or step-uncle) Antigonus on the throne of Judaea (Josephus B.J. 1.248). When Lysanias continued to support Antigonus against the Roman nominee Herod the Great, Mark Antony had him executed, and gave his territory to Cleopatra VII.
GB90942. Bronze AE 19, Herman 11.g, RPC I 4769, HGC 9 145 corr., Lindgren III 1243, BMC Galatia -, VF, weight 3.505 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libano mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse veiled female bust right, no inscription; reverse double cornucopia, flanked by four ligatures ΛYCA, TETP, APX, IΦ (Lysanias tetrarch and high priest); very rare; $400.00 (€352.00)

C. Asinius Gallus, Proconsul of Asia, 6 - 5 B.C., Temnos, Aeolis

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The larger denomination of the same series honored Augustus. On this coin Gallus gives himself the epithet Aγνος, meaning pure or holy! Later he was an ambitious and powerful senator. A foe of Tiberius, in 11 B.C. he married Tiberius' ex-wife, Vipsania. He was suspected of and never denied fathering Tiberius' son, Drusus the Younger. After Vipsania died, he courted the widow of Germanicus, Agrippina. In 30 A.D., Tiberius had him imprisoned and for three years kept him in solitary confinement and on the very edge of starvation until he died. To add further insult he was discredited by damnatio memoriae.
SH74030. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2447; SNG Cop 276; SNG München 627; BMC Troas p. 146, 25; SNGvA -, aEF, attractive olive green patina, weight 4.159 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Temnos mint, 5 B.C.; obverse ACINIOC ΓAΛΛOC AΓNOC, bare head of Asinius Gallus right; reverse APOΛΛAC ΦAINIOY TAMNITAN, head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; rare; $400.00 (€352.00)

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Seleucia Pieria, Syria

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Seleucia Pieria was built by Seleucus I Nicator, c. 300 B.C. It then changed hands several times between the Ptolemies and Seleucids. When the Seleucid Empire was subdued by the Armenian conqueror Tigranes II, Seleucia Pieria resisted. Pompey the Great restored Seleucid rule, giving the city to Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, a direct descendant of Seleucus I Nicator and a loyal ally of Rome. Seleucia enjoyed substantial autonomy, de facto independence, which it kept even to the end of the Roman occupation.
RP75810. Silver tetradrachm, RPC I 4328; Prieur 1186; BMC Galatia p. 273, 32, aVF, nice portrait, toned, minor porosity, weight 15.010 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 180o, Seleucia Pieria mint, 5 - 6 A.D.; obverse KAIΣAPO ΣEBAΣTOY, laureate head right, bead and reel border; reverse filleted fulmen (thunderbolt) set on pulvinar (throne) of Zeus, ΣEΛEYKΩN / THΣ IEPAΣ above, A to left, H to right, I∆P (year 114) under seat, KAI / AYTONOMOY below, all within wreath; CNG e-auction 354, lot 393; rare; $370.00 (€325.60)

Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome(?), Portrait of Antinous, c. 130 - 153 A.D.

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Antinous probably joined the entourage of Hadrian when it passed through Bithynia in about 124. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover but in October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130 A.D., Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues to his memory were erected all over the Empire, and there began a Cult of Antinous. On this coin he is depicted in the guise of Hermanubis.
RX90575. Lead tessera, Dattari 6536, Geissen 3559 var (11.23g), Emmett 4397 (R4), F, weight 4.666 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antinoopolis (or Alexandria?) mint, c. 130 - 153 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Antinous right, wearing hem-hem crown of Harpocrates, crescent before; reverse Serapis standing left, wearing chiton, himation, and kalathos on head, right hand raised, long scepter vertical behind in left; rare; $360.00 (€316.80)

Britannicus, Son of Claudius and Messalina, 12 February 41 - 11 February 55 A.D., Aeolis, Aegae

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Tiberius Claudius Britannicus was born in 41 A.D., son of Cladius I and Messalina. Although the natural heir to the empire, Britannicus was passed over in favor of Nero who then had him murdered a year after his fathers' death.
SH54008. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2431 (4 specimens), SNG Cop -, Fair, weight 3.696 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aegae mint, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse BPETANNIKOC KAICAP, bare head of Britannicus right; reverse AIΓAEΩN EΠI XAΛEOY, Zeus standing left, head facing, eagle in right, long scepter behind in left; extremely rare; $350.00 (€308.00)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Antioch, Syria

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The Sela Neron (Nero Tetradrachm) is mentioned in the Mishna Keilim 17:12.

Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo was the Propraetorial Imperial Legate of Roman Syria from 60 - 63 A.D. In 58 A.D. Corbulo, who had been Caligula's brother-in-law, had defeated the Parthians. Tigranes, who grew up in Rome, was installed as king of Armenia. In 63, Armenia again fell under Parthian hegemony. Corbulo crossed the Euphrates with a strong army. The new Armenian king Tiridates refused battle, laid down his diadem at the foot of the emperor's statue, and promised not to resume it until he received it from the hand of Nero himself in Rome. In 67, Nero, suspicious of Corbulo and his support among the Roman masses, summoned him to Greece. On his arrival at Cenchreae, the port of Corinth, messengers from Nero met Corbulo, and ordered him to commit suicide, which he loyally obeyed by falling on his own sword, saying, "Axios!"
SH73960. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 258, Prieur 82, RPC I 4182, gVF, weight 14.269 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 61 - 62 A.D.; obverse NEPΩNOΣ KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOY, laureate beardless bust right wearing aegis; reverse eagle standing on a thunderbolt, wings spread, palm frond left, H / IP right (regnal year 8 & year 110 of the Caesarian era); $350.00 (€308.00)

Roman Cilicia (Ninica-Claudiopolis?), Octavian/Augustus, c. 30 - 29 B.C.

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This type was previously attributed to Macedonia and the portrait as Brutus or Caesar. RPC I, supported by find data, attributes it to Cilicia, probably Cilicia Pedias, and identifies the portrait as Octavian/Augustus, and likely immediately post-Actian. Seyrig proposed the coins were struck for Octavian/Augustus for the founding of Colonia Iulia Felix Augusta Ninica, and the epithet could be apply to both Octavian and the colony. VE and TER abbreviate the names of the two duumviri (municipal officers) of the colony.
RP74281. Bronze provincial as, RPC I 4082, aVF, countermark: Fair, weight 11.247 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Ninica-Claudiopolis(?) mint, c. 30 - 29 B.C.; obverse PRINCEPS FELIX, bare head of Octavian right; countermark: type obscure in oval punch; reverse VE TER COLONIA IVLIA II VIR, Athena standing left, helmeted and draped; very rare; $350.00 (€308.00)

Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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Eleutheria is the Greek personification of liberty (ancient and modern). Eleutheria was also an epithet for Artemis at Myra, Lycia.
RX74282. Billon tetradrachm, RPC I 5359; Geissen 247; Dattari 326; Milne 365; Curtis 234; BMC Alexandria p. 25, 209; Kampmann 18.5; Emmett 184, aVF, weight 12.604 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 15 Jan 69 - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse AYTOK MAPK OΘΩNOΣ KAIΣ ΣEB, laureate head right, LA (year 1) before; reverse EΛEY−ΘEPIA, Eleutheria standing left, wreath in right, scepter in left, leaning on column; $350.00 (€308.00)

Judaea, Valerius Gratus, Roman Prefect under Tiberius, 15 - 26 A.D., Extremely Rare Hybrid

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SH40205. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 319 (hybrid of 316 obverse and 317 reverse), Hendin - (hybrid of 1332 obverse and 1333 reverse), F, weight 1.426 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, Caesarea mint, 15 - 16 A.D.; obverse [KAI]/CAP (sic), legend within wreath; reverse palm frond flanked by L - B (year 2); extremely rare; $320.00 (€281.60)



Catalog current as of Saturday, October 03, 2015.
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Roman Coins of Roman Provincial