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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman ProvincialView Options:  |  |  |     

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.


Tetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Lysanias, 40 - 36 B.C.

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Lysanias is called Tetrarch of Abila by Josephus. Lysanias' father Ptolemaios was married to Alexandra, Mattathias Antigonus' sister. Lysanias offered the Parthian satrap Barzapharnes a thousand talents and 500 women to depose Hyrcanus and put his uncle (or step-uncle) Antigonus on the throne of Judaea (Josephus B.J. 1.248). When Lysanias continued to support Antigonus against the Roman nominee Herod the Great, Mark Antony had him executed, and gave his territory to Cleopatra VII.
GB90942. Bronze AE 19, Herman 11.g, RPC I 4769, HGC 9 145 corr., Lindgren III 1243, BMC Galatia -, VF, weight 3.505 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libano mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse veiled female bust right, no inscription; reverse double cornucopia, flanked by four ligatures ΛYCA, TETP, APX, IΦ (Lysanias tetrarch and high priest); very rare; $360.00 (€320.40)


Pontus (Amisos?), Roman Quaestor (Lucius Lucullus?), 100 - 50 B.C.

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The Q identifies the bare male head as a Roman Quaestor. This letter is not noted in RPC but is visible here and clear on other examples known to Forum. Perhaps the image is of Lucius Lucullus, an important Quaestor of Sulla, about whom Plutarch wrote. The reverse legend, the Latin FETIA, refers to the fetial ceremony, part of the treaty making process, during which a pig was sacrificed to sanctify the oaths. The mint location is unknown but Imhoof-Blumer placed it at Amisus, where Leypold acquired his specimen.
SH66800. Brass AE 20, RPC I 2156, SNG Leypold I p. 24, 69, F, cleaning scratches, weight 7.222 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Pontus(?) mint, c. 80 B.C.(?); obverse bare male head right, Q below; reverse two standing figures holding a pig between them, each with a hand raised, taking an oath of fealty, FETA IA in exergue; rare; $340.00 (€302.60)


Judaea, Valerius Gratus, Roman Prefect under Tiberius, 15 - 26 A.D., Extremely Rare Hybrid

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SH40205. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 319 (hybrid of 316 obverse and 317 reverse), Hendin - (hybrid of 1332 obverse and 1333 reverse), F, weight 1.426 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, Caesarea mint, 15 - 16 A.D.; obverse [KAI]/CAP (sic), legend within wreath; reverse palm frond flanked by L - B (year 2); extremely rare; $320.00 (€284.80)


Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome(?), Portrait of Antinous, c. 130 - 153 A.D.

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Antinous probably joined the entourage of Hadrian when it passed through Bithynia in about 124. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover but in October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130 A.D., Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues to his memory were erected all over the Empire, and there began a Cult of Antinous. On this coin he is depicted in the guise of Hermanubis.
RX90575. Lead tessera, Dattari 6536, Geissen 3559 var.(11.23g), Emmett 4397 (R4), F, weight 4.666 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antinoopolis (or Alexandria?) mint, c. 130 - 153 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Antinous right, wearing hem-hem crown of Harpocrates, crescent before; reverse Serapis standing left, wearing chiton, himation, and kalathos on head, right hand raised, long scepter vertical behind in left; rare; $320.00 (€284.80)


Britannicus, Son of Claudius and Messalina, 12 February 41 - 11 February 55 A.D., Aeolis, Aegae

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Tiberius Claudius Britannicus was born in 41 A.D., son of Cladius I and Messalina. Although the natural heir to the empire, Britannicus was passed over in favor of Nero who then had him murdered a year after his fathers' death.
SH54008. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2431 (4 specimens), SNG Cop -, Fair, weight 3.696 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aegae mint, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse BPETANNIKOC KAICAP, bare head of Britannicus right; reverse AIΓAEΩN EΠI XAΛEOY, Zeus standing left, head facing, eagle in right, long scepter behind in left; extremely rare; $310.00 (€275.90)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, the Nicoplis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP77447. Bronze AE 29, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.10.32.1 (R5), AMNG I/I 1235, Moushmov 897, Varbanov I 2146 (R4), VF, nice green patina, marks, uneven strike, centration dimples, weight 11.978 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 135o, Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior mint, consular legate Caecilius Servilianus, 189 - 190; obverse AV-T KAI MAP AVPH KOMO∆OC, laureate, bearded head right; reverse HΓ EMOKAIKI CEPBEIΛIA NEIKOΠO ΠPOC ICT, river god reclining left, reeds in right hand, resting left arm on urn from which water flows; $300.00 (€267.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Bizya, Thrace

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Byza (or Byze) was located between Hadrianopolis and Byzantion. The first Roman imperial coins struck at Byza, were struck under Hadrain.
RP77130. Bronze AE 31, Jurukova Bizye, pl. 1, 3; 6 (same dies) 1A; Price-Trell p. 247, 83; Varbanov 1421 var., VF, well centered, green patina, weight 18.00 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, Bizya (Vize, Turkey) mint, magistrate Maec. Nepos, 117 - 119; obverse AYTO TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC KAICA-P CE / GEP B, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, Door with two; reverse EΠI MAI NEΠ ΠPECB KAI ANT, city gate arch, flanked by two columns and two round crenelated towers, quadriga galloping right above, BIZYH/NΩN in two lines in the exergue; ex Numismatik Lanz auction 160 (15 Jun 2010), lot 414; rare; $300.00 (€267.00)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Construction of the Colosseum, started by Vespasian c. 72 A.D., was completed by Titus in 80 A.D. It was capable of seating 50,000 spectators. Games held for its inauguration lasted for 100 days and nights, during which some 5,000 animals were slaughtered.
RB77111. Brass sestertius, cf. RIC II, part 1, 837 (R2); RPC II 530; Cahn Bithynia 24; BnF III 551, BMCRE II 516 (Lyon); Cayon I 52; Cohen I 345; Hunter I -, aVF/F, well centered, a little rough, weight 24.753 g, maximum diameter 37.9 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Thracian mint, 82 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITIAN CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII, laureate head right; reverse PAX AVGVST, Pax standing left, branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking across field; rare; $290.00 (€258.10)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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MON VRB stands for MONETA VRBIS. According to H. R. Baldus this initial issue of coins was minted in Rome. Indeed the portrait style is unmistakably that of the mint of Rome, and even if the coins were actually minted in Antioch, the dies were surely engraved by the Rome mint.
SH60149. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 899, Prieur 304, BMC Galatia 507, EF, weight 13.825 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome or Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 244 or 246 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛ ΦIΛIΠΠOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, S - C below wings, MON VRB in exergue; double strike evident in obverse legend, minor flan crack, small encrustations, very sharp, handsome portrait and eagle; $285.00 (€253.65)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

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In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
SH60141. Silver tetradrachm, McAlee 907a, Prieur 357, SNG Righetti 2027, SNG Cop -, EF, weight 10.949 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust left, Gorgon's head on cuirass; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in exergue; $280.00 (€249.20)




    



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Catalog current as of Thursday, May 26, 2016.
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Roman Coins of Roman Provincial