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Home>Catalog>GreekCoins>Geographic-AllPeriods>Thrace&Moesia>Kallatis

Kallatis, Thrace

Kallatis was founded on the Black Sea by Heraclea Pontica in the 6th century B.C. In Greek Kallatis means "the beautiful." Its first silver coinage was minted approximately 350 B.C. In 72 B.C., Kallatis was conquered by the Roman general Lucullus and was included in the Roman province of Moesia Inferior. Throughout the 2nd century A.D., the city built defensive fortifications. Kallatis suffered multiple invasions in the 3rd century A.D. but recovered in the 4th century A.D. to regain its status as an important trade hub and port city. Today Kallatis is called Mangalia, the oldest city in Bulgaria.


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C.

Click for a larger photo Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and the Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.GB68080. Bronze AE 13, Müller pl. XLII, 14; SNG Cop 1168, SGCV II 6822, VF, weight 2.519 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right clad in lion's scalp headdress; reverse BAΣI/ΛYΣI within a wreath of grain; $150.00 (€130.50)


Kallatis, Thrace, c. 300 - 250 B.C.

Click for a larger photo SNG Stancomb - Kallatis, on the Black Sea, is today Mangalia, the oldest town in Romania. In Greek Callatis means "the beautiful." -- Greek Imperial Coins, Vol. I, Dacia, Moesia Superior, Moesia Inferior by Ivan VarbanovSH72266. Silver tetrobol, SNG Cop 177; AMNG I 200; SNG BM 203 var (Σ right); BMC Thrace p. 21, 2 var (same), VF, high relief head of Herakles, reverse double struck, weight 2.312 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 180o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse KAΛΛATIA (downward), stalk of grain and club left, bow in bowcase right; $150.00 (€130.50)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C.

Click for a larger photo Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and the Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.GB69763. Bronze AE 14, Müller pl. XLII, 14; SNG Cop 1168, SGCV II 6822, VF, weight 2.336 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 180o, Kallatis(?) mint, c. 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right clad in lion's scalp headdress; reverse BAΣI/ΛYΣI within a wreath of grain; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $45.00 (€39.15)



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REFERENCES

Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Müller, L. Die Münzen Des Thracishen Konigs Lysimacus. (Copenhagen, 1858).
Müller, L. Numismatique d’Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Pick, B. Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I. (Berlin, 1898).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Price, M. J. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (Zurich-London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2: Volume 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 7: Taurische Chersonesos, Sarmatien, Dacia, Moesia superior, Moesia inferior. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Wartenberg, U. and J.H. Kagan, "Some Comments on a New Hoard from the Balkan Sea" in Travaux Le Rider.
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior. (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).

Catalog current as of Saturday, April 18, 2015.
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Kallatis