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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheImperators>JuliusCaesar

Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, assassinated 15 March 44 B.C.

Gaius Julius Caesar is one of the most famous men in history. At the end of his brilliant military and political career he had gained control of the Roman state. His puppet senate heaped more and more honors upon him. In February 44 B.C. the senate named him dictator for life. Many senators, however, feared that he wished to become king, ending the Republic. On the 15th of March 44 B.C., 63 senators attacked him with knives they had hidden in the folds of their togas. This most famous of assassinations plunged the Roman Republic into 17 years of civil war, after which it would re-emerge as the Roman Empire.


Octavian and Divus Julius Caesar, Second Triumvirate, 36 B.C., Lugdunum, Gaul
Click for a larger photo Lyon was originally founded as the Roman city Colonia Copia Felix Munatia, a name invoking prosperity and the blessing of the gods. The city became increasingly referred to as Lugdunum by the end of the 1st century A.D. The etymology of Lugdunum is a latinization of the Gaulish place name Lugodunon. While dunon means hill fort, the source of Lug is uncertain. The most commonly offered meaning is the Celtic god named Lug. During the Middle Ages, Lugdunum was transformed to Lyon by natural sound change.
RR70870. Bronze dupondius, RPC I 515, Giard Lyon 7, SNG Cop 689, F, weight 16.797 g, maximum diameter 29.9 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 36 B.C.; obverse IMP CAESAR DIVI F DIVI IVLI, two heads back to back: laureate head of Divus Julius Caesar to left and bare head of Octavian to right; between them palm branch with its tip bent to right over Octavian's head; reverse Prow of galley to right, ornamented with an eye and dolphin; star superimposed on globe and meta above deck, COPIA below; rare; $850.00 SALE PRICE $765.00

Julius Caesar and Octavian, Second Triumvirate, 36 B.C., Vienne, Gaul
Click for a larger photo Vienne is in south-eastern France, 20 miles (32 km) south of Lyon, on the Rhone River. Before the arrival of the Roman armies under Julius Caesar, Vienne was the capital city of the Allobroges. RPC misspells the name, Vienna.

The denomination struck at Vienne was a dupondius and the type was frequently halved to make two asses.
SH65824. Bronze cut half dupondius (as), cut half of RPC I 517, SNG Cop 703, F, green patina flaking at 12:00, weight 5.758 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 36 B.C.; obverse [IMP / CAESAR DIVI F DIV]I IVLI, bare heads of Julius Caesar left [and Octavian right (off flan)]; reverse [C I V] (Colonia Iulia Viennensis), prow right with superstructure; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00

Julius Caesar and Octavian, Second Triumvirate, 36 B.C., Vienne, Gaul
Click for a larger photo Vienne is in south-eastern France, 20 miles (32 km) south of Lyon, on the Rhone River. Before the arrival of the Roman armies under Julius Caesar, Vienne was the capital city of the Allobroges. RPC misspells the name, Vienna.

The denomination struck at Vienne was a dupondius and the type was frequently halved to make two asses.
RR65956. Bronze cut fragment, cut half of RPC I 517, SNG Cop -, F, weight 10.384 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 0o, Gaul, Vienne mint, 36 B.C.; obverse IMP / CAESAR DIVI F DIVI IVLI, bare heads of Julius Caesar left [and Octavian right (off flan)]; reverse [C I V] (Colonia Iulia Viennensis), prow right with superstructure; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00

Thessalonica, Macedonia, Julius Caesar, and Augustus, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later)
Click for a larger photo RPC tentatively dates the type to the reign of Augustus but notes it may have been struck as late as the reign of Domitian.
RP70490. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 1555; BMC Macedonia p. 115, 60; cf. SNG Cop 395 (Julius Caesar laureate); SGICV I 151 (same), F+, weight 8.287 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later); obverse ΘEOC, bare head of Julius Caesar right; reverse ΘECCAΛONI KEΩN, bare head of Augustus right; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00

Julius Caesar and Octavian, Second Triumvirate, 36 B.C., Vienne, Gaul
Click for a larger photo Vienne is in south-eastern France, 20 miles (32 km) south of Lyon, on the Rhone River. Before the arrival of the Roman armies under Julius Caesar, Vienne was the capital city of the Allobroges. RPC misspells the name, Vienna.

The denomination struck at Vienne was a dupondius and the type was frequently halved to make two asses.
RR90541. Bronze cut half dupondius (as), cut half of RPC I 517, SNG Cop -, F, green patina, weight 8.745 g, maximum diameter 30.4 mm, die axis 0o, Gaul, Vienne mint, 36 B.C.; obverse IMP / CAESAR DIVI F DIVI IVLI, bare heads of Julius Caesar left [and Octavian right (off flan)]; reverse C I V (Colonia Iulia Viennensis), prow right with superstructure; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


ITEMS PER PAGE 13510203050



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Obverse legends:

CAESARDICTINPERPETVO
CAESARDICTPERPETVO
CAESARDICTQVART
CAESARIMP
CAESARIMPER
CAESDICQVAR
CCAESARCOSTER
CCAESDICTER


REFERENCES

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Firenze, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l’Empire Romain. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, Sear, and Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 01, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Caesar