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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>RomanMints>LaodiceaadMare PAGE 1/212

Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia), Syria

The Laodicea mint, like that at Emesa, operated for Septimius Severus' family, from 195 to 202 A.D.


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 193, Laodicea was sacked by the governor of Syria, Pescennius Niger, in his revolt against Septimius Severus. In 194, Septimius Severus reorganized Syria into five new provinces. One of these, Coele-Syria, including all of northern Syria, briefly had its capital in Laodicea before reverting to Antioch. Septimius sought to punish Antioch for having supported Pescennius Niger. Septimius Severus endowed Laodicea with four colonnaded streets, baths, a theater, a hippodrome, numerous sanctuaries and other public buildings in the city. The city was a key strategic seaport for Roman Syria.
RS90503. Silver denarius, RIC IV 511(a), RSC III 4 55a; BMCRE V p. 294, 712; SRCV II -, Choice aEF, bold full circles strike on a broad flan, weight 3.231 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 - 200 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse P MAX TR P VIII COS II P P, Fides standing half left, raising a basket of fruits in right, two stalks of grain in left; $225.00 (168.75) ON RESERVE

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 193, Laodicea was sacked by the governor of Syria, Pescennius Niger, in his revolt against Septimius Severus. In 194, Septimius Severus reorganized Syria into five new provinces. One of these, Coele-Syria, including all of northern Syria, briefly had its capital in Laodicea before reverting to Antioch. Septimius sought to punish Antioch for having supported Pescennius Niger. Septimius Severus endowed Laodicea with four colonnaded streets, baths, a theater, a hippodrome, numerous sanctuaries and other public buildings in the city. Laodicea was a key strategic seaport for Roman Syria.
RS68071. Silver denarius, SRCV II 6822, RIC IV 337d, RSC III 168c, EF, nice boy portrait, weight 3.654 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 45o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR ANTON AVG P TR P, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse MONETA AVGG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; scarce; $220.00 (165.00)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 200, Septimius Severus visited Syria, Palestine and Arabia. Palestine, benefiting from the benevolent policies of Severus, began a significant economic revival.
RS90475. Silver denarius, RIC IV 505, RSC III 251, BMCRE V 660, Choice aEF, weight 4.038 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 - 202 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse IVSTITIA, Justitia seated left on throne, patera in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; scarce; $185.00 (138.75) ON RESERVE

Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo On some coins of this type but with the normal MARTI VICTORI reverse legend, the final I is cramped. On at least one reverse die the final letter(s) of the reverse legend were erased and re-engraved to RI. Apparently a number of dies for this type were originally engraved ending in R, like our coin, but few coins were struck with them prior to discovery and correction.
RS68974. Silver denarius, Unlisted legend variant; cf. RSC III 76a (VICTORI), RIC IV 103 (same, draped only), BMCRE V 742 (same, but plate coin clearly draped & cuirassed), VF, well centered, weight 3.131 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare mint, 202 A.D.; obverse P SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse MARTI VICTOR (sic), Mars advancing right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left; rare variant; $160.00 (120.00)

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.
Click for a larger photo It's estimated that in 200 A.D. the worldwide human population was about 257 million.
RS68059. Silver denarius, RIC IV 351b, RSC III 573a, BMCRE V 703, VF, well centered, edge cracks, weight 3.198 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 199 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped older boy's bust right, from behind; reverse SECVRIT ORBIS, Securitas seated left, scepter vertical in right, propping head on left hand, left elbow on back of throne; scarce; $150.00 (112.50)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Annona was the goddess of harvest and her main attribute is grain. This reverse suggests the arrival of grain by sea from the provinces (especially from Egypt) and its distribution to the people.
RS68303. Silver denarius, RIC IV 501, RSC III 39, BMCRE V 652, SRCV II 6262, VF, excellent centering, weight 3.572 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia) mint, 198 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse ANNONAE AVGG, Annona standing half left, right foot on prow, stalks of grain in right hand, cornucopia in left; $150.00 (112.50) ON RESERVE

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo This type refers to Severus' victories over Parthia. Severus assumed the title "Parthicus Maximus," greatest of Parthian conquerors.
RS90490. Silver denarius, BMCRE V p. 288, 675; RIC IV 514 corr. (palm vice trophy); RSC III 741; SRCV II 6373, Choice gVF, toned, slightly frosty surfaces, weight 2.989 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 - 202 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse VICT P-AR-T-HIC-AE, Victory walking left, wreath in extended right, trophy of captured arms in left; Parthian captive at feet on left, bearded and wearing a Parthian cap, seated left, looking up and back at Victory, hands bound behind back; $145.00 (108.75)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo PAR AR AD abbreviates Parthicus Arabicus Adiabenicus, the Parthian, the Arabian, the Adiabenican titles given to Septimius Severus for having conquered those countries.
RS90481. Silver denarius, RIC IV 495, BMCRE V 625, RSC III 361, SRCV II 6321, Choice VF, toned, weight 2.561 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 45o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 A.D.; obverse L SEP SEVERVS PER AVG P M IMP XI, laureate head right; reverse PAR AR AD TR P VI COS II P P, Victory walking left, wreath in right, palm-branch in left; scarce reverse legend; $135.00 (101.25)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 193, Laodicea was sacked by the governor of Syria, Pescennius Niger, in his revolt against Septimius Severus. In 194, Septimius Severus reorganized Syria into five new provinces. One of these, Coele-Syria, including all of northern Syria, briefly had its capital in Laodicea before reverting to Antioch. Septimius sought to punish Antioch for having supported Pescennius Niger. Septimius Severus endowed Laodicea with four colonnaded streets, baths, a theater, a hippodrome, numerous sanctuaries and other public buildings in the city. The city was a key strategic seaport for Roman Syria.
RS90492. Silver denarius, RIC IV 511(a), RSC III 4 55a; BMCRE V p. 294, 712; SRCV II -, aEF, toned, nice style, good strike, weight 3.375 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 200 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse P MAX TR P VIII COS II P P, Fides standing facing, head left, raising a plate of fruits in right, two stalks of grain downward in left; $135.00 (101.25)

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.
Click for a larger photo It's estimated that in 200 A.D. the worldwide human population was about 257 million.
RS60446. Silver denarius, RIC IV 351b, RSC III 573a, BMCRE V 703, nice VF, weight 2.786 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 199 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS, laureate and draped older boy's bust right, from behind; reverse SECVRIT ORBIS, Securitas seated left, scepter vertical in right, propping head on left hand, left elbow on back of throne; scarce; $130.00 (97.50)



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Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 16, 2014.
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Laodicea ad Mare