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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheTwelveCaesars>Vespasian PAGE 1/212

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

After a successful campaign in Judaea (which he left to his son Titus to finish), Flavius Vespasianus was declared emperor by his troops at Alexandria in 69 A.D. Upon the defeat of Vitellius by the Danubian legions, Vespasian went to Rome and consolidated his power. He built the Colosseum and other important public works. Vespasian was popular, being both down to earth and possessed of great wit. He was responsible for the economic and military recovery of Rome, and is justly regarded as one of the greatest Roman emperors.


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo RIC II identifies this type as common but this is the first example ever handled by Forum. Examples as attractive as this one are certainly scarce.

Ephesus peaked during the 1st and 2nd century A.D. when it was second in importance and size only to Rome, with a population estimated at 400,000 to 500,000 in 100 A.D. The city was famous for the Temple of Artemis, the Library of Celsus, and its theater, seating 25,000 spectators. Ephesus also had several large bath complexes and one of the most advanced aqueduct systems in the ancient world. Water powered numerous mills, one of which has been identified as a sawmill for marble. The city and temple were destroyed by the Goths in 263 A.D., marking the decline of the city's splendor.
SL90459. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1433 (C); RPC II 835; RSC II 293; BMCRE II 459; BnF III 356, NGC Choice VF, strike 3/5, surface 4/5, fine style (2410826-005); fantastic rainbow toning, weight 3.25 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 45o, Ephesus mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, laureate head right; reverse PACI ORB TERR AVG, turreted and draped female bust right; EPHE (PHE ligate) below; ex Heritage Auction 3032, lot 30506; $540.00 (405.00)

Judaean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa II, 55 - 95 A.D., Struck for Vespasian
Click for a larger photo Julius Marcus Agrippa was a teenager studying in Rome when his father died. He was too young to rule and his father's kingdom was made a Roman province. About 6 years later, he was given the kingdom of his uncle Herod of Chalcis. Later more was added. It was before Herod Agrippa II that Saint Paul was tried. Agrippa sided with the Romans during the Jewish rebellion. Though he continued to rule until at least 95 A.D., the temple was destroyed and in the end his assigned territories were in Syria, not Judaea.
SH90326. Bronze AE 30, RPC II 2283; Meshorer 166; Hendin 1288; AJC II 38, F, weight 15.554 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Panaeas mint, 75 - 76 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Vespasian right; reverse Tyche-Demeter standing left, kalathos on head, two grain ears in extended right, cornucopia in left, star upper left, ETOY − KZ BA / AΓPI−ΠΠA (year 27, King Agrippa) flanking in two lines across field; ex CNG auction 233 (26 May 2010), lot 292 and auction 75 (23 May 2007), lot 863.; $450.00 (337.50)

Click for a larger photo "Judaea Capta" issue. The reverse depicts Vespasian riding in the Judaea Capta triumph of 71 A.D. The Jewish historian Josephus was present at the festivities and noted, "It is impossible to do justice in the description of the number of things to be seen and to the magnificence of everything that met the eye...The greatest amazement was caused by the floats. Their size gave grounds for alarm about their stability, for many were three or four stories high..On one float the army could be seen pouring inside the walls, on another was a palace running with blood. Others showed defenseless men raising their hands in entreaty, firebrands being hurled at temples or buildings falling on their owners. On yet others were depicted rivers, which, after the destruction and desolation, flowed no longer through tilled fields providing water for men and cattle, but through a land on fire from end to end. It was to such miseries that the Jews doomed themselves by the war..Standing on his individual float was the commander of each of the captured cities showing the way he had been taken prisoner...Spoil in abundance was carried past. None of it compared with that taken from the Temple in Jerusalem...The procession was completed by Vespasian, and, behind him, Titus."
SH90666. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1559; RPC II 1931; RSC II 643; BMCRE II 512; BnF III 320; Hendin 1491; SRCV I 2279, VF, superb portrait, well centered but tight flan cuts off head on reverse, weight 3.457 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Vespasian driving triumphal quadriga right, branch and reins in right, scepter in left; $400.00 (300.00)

Click for a larger photo This type may refer to a victory on the Sea of Galilee during the recapture of Judaea.
RB68879. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 335; BMCRE II 617; Cohen 632; SRCV I -, F, well centered, nice green patina, small areas of corrosion on obv, weight 12.620 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, radiate head right; reverse VICTORIA NAVALIS, Victory standing right on a prow, wreath in right, palm frond over should in left, S C in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $350.00 (262.50)

Click for a larger photo On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av morns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
SH68916. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 2; Hendin 1479; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; SRCV I 2296, VF, weight 2.890 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse IVDAEA, Jewess seated right, mourning, veiled, supporting chin with left hand, trophy of captured arms behind her; $350.00 (262.50)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta
Click for a larger photo "Judaea Capta" issue. The reverse depicts Vespasian riding in the Judaea Capta triumph of 71 A.D. The Jewish historian Josephus was present at the festivities and noted, "It is impossible to do justice in the description of the number of things to be seen and to the magnificence of everything that met the eye...The greatest amazement was caused by the floats. Their size gave grounds for alarm about their stability, for many were three or four stories high..On one float the army could be seen pouring inside the walls, on another was a palace running with blood. Others showed defenseless men raising their hands in entreaty, firebrands being hurled at temples or buildings falling on their owners. On yet others were depicted rivers, which, after the destruction and desolation, flowed no longer through tilled fields providing water for men and cattle, but through a land on fire from end to end. It was to such miseries that the Jews doomed themselves by the war..Standing on his individual float was the commander of each of the captured cities showing the way he had been taken prisoner...Spoil in abundance was carried past. None of it compared with that taken from the Temple in Jerusalem...The procession was completed by Vespasian, and, behind him, Titus."
SH90665. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1559; RPC II 1931; RSC II 643; BMCRE II 512; BnF III 320; Hendin 1491; SRCV I 2279, VF, grainy surfaces (typical for the type), die crack at temple, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Vespasian driving triumphal quadriga right, branch and reins in right, scepter in left; ex Pecunem Gitbud & Naumann auction 2, lot 211; $350.00 (262.50)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Commemorative Issued by Titus
Click for a larger photo One 23 June 79 A.D. Vespasian died from fever and diarrhea. Known for his humor, his last words on his deathbed were, "I think I'm turning into a god." Titus succeeded his father as Roman emperor and issued this coin to commemorate his father's consecration.
SH72117. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Titus 357; RSC II 497; BMCRE II 129; BnF III 101; SRCV I 2569, gVF, much mint luster, perfectly centered obverse, high point of bust weak, weight 3.466 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, posthumous, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right; reverse two Capricorns supporting shield inscribed S C, globe below; ex CNG/Seaby Coins; $300.00 (225.00)

Click for a larger photo This coin may have been struck to appeal to Pax to deliver peace at the time the First Jewish Revolt was coming to its end. On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av morns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
RS90450. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 29; RSC II 94h; BMCRE II 26; BnF III 17; SRCV I 2285, gVF, sharp, luster, excellent portrait, well centered, some obverse legend unstruck and off flan, weight 3.380 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS ITER TR POT, Pax seated left on chair without back, branch in right hand, caduceus in left; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancient Coins Signature Auction 3020, part of lot 30527; $200.00 (150.00)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Commemorative Issued by Titus
Click for a larger photo One 23 June 79 A.D. Vespasian died from fever and diarrhea. Known for his humor, his last words on his deathbed were, "I think I'm turning into a god." Titus succeeded his father as Roman emperor and issued this coin to commemorate his father's consecration.
RS70155. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Titus 357; RSC II 497; BMCRE II 129; BnF III 101; SRCV I 2569, aVF, excellent portrait, toned, weight 3.230 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right; reverse two Capricorns supporting shield inscribed S C, globe below; $190.00 (142.50)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo This coin may have been struck to appeal to Pax to deliver peace at the time the First Jewish Revolt was coming to its end. On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av morns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
RS90455. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 29; RSC II 94h; BMCRE II 26; BnF III 17; SRCV I 2285, gVF, luster, excellent portrait, flat reverse strike, weight 3.448 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS ITER TR POT, Pax seated left on chair without back, olive branch in right hand, caduceus in left; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancient Coins Signature Auction 3032, part of lot 30513; $180.00 (135.00)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta
Click for a larger photo On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av morns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
SH90414. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 2; Hendin 1479; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; SRCV I 2296, F, toned, weight 2.312 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse IVDAEA, Jewess seated right, mourning, veiled, supporting chin with left hand, trophy of captured arms behind her; $180.00 (135.00)

Click for a larger photo Edward Gibbon wrote of Antioch: "Fashion was the only law, pleasure the only pursuit, and the splendour of dress and furniture was the only distinction of the citizens of Antioch. The arts of luxury were honoured, the serious and manly virtues were the subject of ridicule, and the contempt for female modesty and reverent age announced the universal corruption of the capital of the East." Antioch was, paradoxically, also an important hub of early Christianity. Late in 311, an embassy from Antioch presented themselves before Maximinus and requested permission to banish Christians from their city. Maximinus initially agreed, but in May 313 restored privileges and property to Christians.
RS90449. Silver denarius, RIC II, part I, 1554 (R2); RPC II 1927; BMCRE II 505 (Rome); RSC II 74, gVF, excellent portrait, well centered on a tight flan, weight 2.963 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGVSTI, Concordia seated left, extending patera in right hand, cornucopia in left; would improve with cleaning; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancient Coins Signature Auction 3020, part of lot 30520; $175.00 (131.25)

Click for a larger photo The caduceus, the traditional symbol of Hermes featuring two snakes around an often winged staff, is often mistakenly used as a symbol of medicine, instead of the Rod of Asclepius. The caduceus appeared on the chevrons of U.S. Army hospital stewards as early as 1856 and was formally adopted by the Medical Department of the United States Army in 1902 and added to the uniforms of medical officers. Even the American Medical Association used the symbol for a time. In 1912, after considerable discussion, the caduceus was abandoned by the AMA and the rod of Asclepius was adopted instead. The U.S. military medical corps all now also use the more appropriate rod of Asclepius.
RS70136. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 703; RSC II 362; BMCRE II 138; BnF III 113; SRCV I 2299, aVF, superb portrait, toned, weight 3.239 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TR P COS V PON MAX, winged caduceus; $165.00 (123.75)

Click for a larger photo The caduceus, the traditional symbol of Hermes featuring two snakes around an often winged staff, is often mistakenly used as a symbol of medicine, instead of the Rod of Asclepius. The caduceus appeared on the chevrons of U.S. Army hospital stewards as early as 1856 and was formally adopted by the Medical Department of the United States Army in 1902 and added to the uniforms of medical officers. Even the American Medical Association used the symbol for a time. In 1912, after considerable discussion, the caduceus was abandoned by the AMA and the rod of Asclepius was adopted instead. The U.S. military medical corps all now also use the more appropriate rod of Asclepius.
RS70149. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 686 (R); BnF III 120; BMCRE II 146; RSC II 390; SRCV I 2306, aVF, toned, weight 3.381 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESP AVG, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM, winged caduceus; scarce; $165.00 (123.75)

Click for a larger photo In 75 A.D., the Temple of Peace was built in Rome to celebrate the conquest of Jerusalem in 70 and house the Menorah and other sacred objects from Herod's Temple. A representation of the menorah is depicted in a frieze on the Arch of Titus. According to the Torah, the menorah was hammered from pure gold following the design God revealed to Moses. The menorah was looted by the Vandals in the sacking of Rome in 455, and taken to their capital, Carthage. According to Procopius, the Byzantine General Belisarius recovered it when he defeated the Vandals in 533 and it was carried through the streets of Constantinople during his triumph. Procopius adds that it was later sent back to Jerusalem, after which there is no further record of it. The Torah might have been destroyed when the Persians pillaged Jerusalem in 614.
RS90451. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 772; RSC II 366; BMCRE II 161; BnF III 139; SRCV I 2301, VF, some luster, well centered, nice portrait, weight 3.382 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 75 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left, extending olive-branch in right hand, left hand at side; ex Heritage CICF Worlrd and Ancient Coins Signature Auction 3032, lot 30513; $165.00 (123.75)

Click for a larger photo This coin may have been struck to appeal to Pax to deliver peace at the time the First Jewish Revolt was coming to its end. On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av morns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
RS90452. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 41; SRCV I 2313; BMCRE II 61; RSC II 566, gVF, superb portrait, some luster, tight flan, reverse not fully struck, weight 3.605 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, Jan - Jun 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse TRI POT II COS III P P, Pax seated left, olive-branch in right hand, caduceus in left; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancient Coins Signature Auction 3032, part of lot 30513; $165.00 (123.75)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 75 A.D., the Temple of Peace was built in Rome to celebrate the conquest of Jerusalem in 70 and house the Menorah and other sacred objects from Herod's Temple. A representation of the menorah is depicted in a frieze on the Arch of Titus. According to the Torah, the menorah was hammered from pure gold following the design God revealed to Moses. The menorah was looted by the Vandals in the sacking of Rome in 455, and taken to their capital, Carthage. According to Procopius, the Byzantine General Belisarius recovered it when he defeated the Vandals in 533 and it was carried through the streets of Constantinople during his triumph. Procopius adds that it was later sent back to Jerusalem, after which there is no further record of it. The Torah might have been destroyed when the Persians pillaged Jerusalem in 614.
RS90456. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 772; RSC II 366; BMCRE II 161; BnF III 139; SRCV I 2301, gVF, excellent portrait and centering, struck with a worn reverse die, weight 3.535 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 75 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left, extending olive-branch in right hand, left hand at side; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancient Coins Signature Auction 3032, lot 30527; $165.00 (123.75)

Click for a larger photo The yoke of oxen symbolize colonization. The ceremonial founding of a colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city. Although no legions were disbanded after the Jewish revolt, there were many retiring veterans that needed to be settled. Vespasian founded a colony at Caesarea Maritima, the first in the province.
RS70159. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Vespasian 951 (R); RSC II 67; BMCRE II 225; BnF III 201; SRCV I 2440, gF, toned, weight 3.330 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate head right; reverse yoke of two oxen left, COS VI in exergue; scarce; $160.00 (120.00)

Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.
Click for a larger photo
Sometime between 77 and 79 A.D. Pliny the Elder published Naturalis Historia (The Natural History). An early encyclopedia, it is one of the largest single works to have survived from the Roman Empire to the modern day and purports to cover all ancient knowledge. The work's subject area is thus not limited to what is today understood by natural history; Pliny himself defines his scope as "the natural world, or life." The work is divided into 37 books, organized into ten volumes. These cover topics including astronomy, mathematics, geography, ethnography, anthropology, human physiology, zoology, botany, agriculture, horticulture, pharmacology, mining, mineralogy, sculpture, painting, and precious stones. The Natural History became a model for later encyclopedias and scholarly works as a result of its breadth of subject matter, it's referencing of original authors, and its index. The work is dedicated to the emperor Titus, son of Pliny's close friend, the emperor Vespasian, in the first year of Titus's reign. It is the only work by Pliny to have survived and the last that he published, lacking a final revision at the time of his death during the A.D. 79 eruption of Vesuvius. Naturalis Historia

RS90648. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Vespasian 921 (C2); RSC II 47; BMCRE II Vespasian 193; BnF Vespasian III 169; SRCV I 2637, VF, nice portrait, tight and slightly ragged flan, weight 3.389 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, early 76 - early 77 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right; reverse COS IIII, Pegasus standing right, curved pointed wings, both showing, raising left foreleg; $160.00 (120.00)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Vespasian, in 70 A.D., and Titus, in the following year, had both safely returned to Rome by sea voyage. In thanks, this reverse type, copied from Octavian, was struck on coins of both Vespasian and Titus honoring Neptune under the name Redux.
RS90674. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1555 (C); BMCRE II 506; RPC II 1928; RSC II 274; BnF III 54; Hunter I 28; SRCV I 2276, VF, dark toning, upper reverse not fully struck, weight 3.402 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse NEP RED, Neptune standing left, nude, foot on globe, acrostolium in right, long scepter vertical in left; $160.00 (120.00)

Click for a larger photo In 77 A.D., Pliny the Elder published the first ten books of Naturalis Historia.
RS70132. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 937; RSC II 125; BMCRE II 200; BnF III 177; SRCV I 2288, aVF, superb portrait, toned, weight 3.379 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180-o, Rome mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS VIII, Mars standing left, nude but for helmet and chlamys, spear in right hand, trophy in left; $155.00 (116.25)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Commemorative Issued by Titus
Click for a larger photo One 23 June 79 A.D. Vespasian died from fever and diarrhea. Known for his humor, his last words on his deathbed were, "I think I'm turning into a god." Titus succeeded his father as Roman emperor and issued this coin to commemorate his father's consecration.
SH70122. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Titus 357; RSC II 497; BMCRE II 129; BnF III 101; SRCV I 2569, aVF, toned, weight 3.393 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right; reverse two Capricorns back-to-back supporting shield inscribed S C, globe below; $150.00 (112.50)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars represented military power as a way to secure peace, and was a father (pater) of the Roman people. The stalk of grain may refer to Mars' roll as an agricultural guardian.
RS90448. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 939 (R); RSC II 129; BnF III 179; BMCRE II 203, SRCV I -, VF, luster, well centered, weight 3.354 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS VIII, Mars standing left, nude but for helmet and chlamys, spear in right hand, trophy in left, grain ear on right; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancients Signature Auction 3032, part of lot 30530; rare; $150.00 (112.50)

Click for a larger photo Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RS90454. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 849; BMCRE III 276; RSC II 222; BnF III 249; SRCV I 2295, VF, excellent portrait and centering, small areas flatly struck, weight 3.458 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 75 - 76 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVIS CVSTOS (Jupiter the Preserver), Jupiter standing half-left, sacrificing from patera in right over small lit altar at feet on left, long scepter grounded behind in left; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancient Coins Signature Auction 3032, part of lot 30530; $145.00 (108.75)

Click for a larger photo The caduceus, the traditional symbol of Hermes featuring two snakes around an often winged staff, is often mistakenly used as a symbol of medicine, instead of the Rod of Asclepius. The caduceus appeared on the chevrons of U.S. Army hospital stewards as early as 1856 and was formally adopted by the Medical Department of the United States Army in 1902 and added to the uniforms of medical officers. Even the American Medical Association used the symbol for a time. In 1912, after considerable discussion, the caduceus was abandoned by the AMA and the rod of Asclepius was adopted instead. The U.S. military medical corps all now also use the more appropriate rod of Asclepius.
RS70156. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 703; RSC II 362; BMCRE II 138; BnF III 113; SRCV I 2299, F, excellent portrait, toned, weight 3.078 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TR P COS V PON MAX, winged caduceus; $140.00 (105.00)

Click for a larger photo The curule chair was for senior magistrates including dictators, masters of the horse, consuls, praetors, censors, and the curule aediles. As a form of throne, it might be given as an honor to foreign kings recognized formally as friend (amicus) by the Roman people or senate. Designed for use by commanders in the field, the curule chair could be folded for easy transport. It had no back, low arms, curved legs forming an X, and was traditionally made of or veneered with ivory.
RS90453. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 685; RSC II 386; BnF III 119; BMCRE -; SRCV I -, VF, weight 3.361 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESP AVG, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM, Vespasian seated right on curule chair, feet on footstool, long scepter behind in right, branch in left; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancient Coins Signature Auction 3032, part of lot 30520; rare; $135.00 (101.25)

Click for a larger photo The curule chair was for senior magistrates including dictators, masters of the horse, consuls, praetors, censors, and the curule aediles. As a form of throne, it might be given as an honor to foreign kings recognized formally as friend (amicus) by the Roman people or senate. Designed for use by commanders in the field, the curule chair could be folded for easy transport. It had no back, low arms, curved legs forming an X, and was traditionally made of or veneered with ivory.
RS70125. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 702; RSC II 364; BMCRE II 136; BnF III 110; SRCV I 2300 var (VESP AVG), aVF, toned, weight 2.952 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PON MAX TR P COS V, Vespasian seated right on curule chair, feet on footstool, branch in left, scepter in right; $125.00 (93.75)

Click for a larger photo The curule chair was for senior magistrates including dictators, masters of the horse, consuls, praetors, censors, and the curule aediles. As a form of throne, it might be given as an honor to foreign kings recognized formally as friend (amicus) by the Roman people or senate. Designed for use by commanders in the field, the curule chair could be folded for easy transport. It had no back, low arms, curved legs forming an X, and was traditionally made of or veneered with ivory.
RS70135. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 702; RSC II 364; BMCRE II 136; BnF III 110; SRCV I 2300 var (VESP AVG), aVF/F, superb portrait, toned, weight 3.335 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PON MAX TR P COS V, Vespasian seated right on curule chair, feet on footstool, branch in left, scepter in right; $125.00 (93.75)

Click for a larger photo The curule chair was for senior magistrates including dictators, masters of the horse, consuls, praetors, censors, and the curule aediles. As a form of throne, it might be given as an honor to foreign kings recognized formally as friend (amicus) by the Roman people or senate. Designed for use by commanders in the field, the curule chair could be folded for easy transport. It had no back, low arms, curved legs forming an X, and was traditionally made of or veneered with ivory.
RS70145. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 545: RSC II 387a: BnF III 97: BMCRE II 98 var (CENS, noted variety); SRCV I 2305 var (CENS), F, dark toning, weight 3.246 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM, Vespasian seated right on curule chair, feet on footstool, scepter vertical behind in right, branch in left; $125.00 (93.75)

Click for a larger photo Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars represented military power as a way to secure peace, and was a father (pater) of the Roman people.
RS70158. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 937; RSC II 125; BMCRE II 200; BnF III 177; SRCV I 2288, F, nice portrait, iridescent obverse toning, weight 3.318 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS VIII, Mars standing left, nude but for helmet and chlamys, transverse spear in right hand, trophy in left; $125.00 (93.75)



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Obverse legends:

CAESARVESPASIANVSAVG
DIVVSAVGVSTVSVESPASIANVS
DIVOAVGVESPSPQR
DIVOVESPASIANO
IMPCAESARAVGVESPASIANVS
IMPCAESARVESPASAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSII
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSIIITRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVGCOSIIITRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSVTRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASIAN
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVS
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSTRP
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVGCOSIII
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVGCOSIIII
IMPCAESARVESPAVG
IMPCAESARVESPAVGCOSVCENS
IMPCAESARVESPAVGVST
IMPCAESVESPASAVG
IMPCAESVESPASAVGPMTRPPPCSIII
IMPCAESVESPASAVGTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSIIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSVIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSVIIIPP
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGPMTRPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGPMTRPPPCOSVCENS
IMPCAESARVESPASCOSIIICENS
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVGPMTPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGCEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGCENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSIIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSVCENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSIIIICEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSVCEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTPCOSIIIICENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTRPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTRPIIIIPPCOSIIII
IMPVESPASAVGPMTRIPPPCOSIIII
IMPVESPASIANAVG
IMPVESPAVG
IMPVESPCAESAVGPONTMAXTRIBPOTCOSIIPP
IMPVESPCAESAVGPONTMAXTRIBPOTCOSIIIIPP
TCAESVESPASIANIMPPTRPCOSII




Average well preserved denarius weight 3.30 grams.
Catalog current as of Thursday, December 18, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Vespasian