<Please login or register to view your wish list!

MAIN MENU    RECENT ADDITIONS    PRICE REDUCTIONS
ROMAN    GREEK    JUDEAN & BIBLICAL    BYZANTINE
BOOKS & SUPPLIES    COLLECTING THEMES    ANTIQUITIES   

 

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Roman Coins
Roman Coins Showcase

Roman Gold (2)
Roman Rarities (227)
Roman Republic (153)
The Imperators (18)
The Twelve Caesars (125)
The Adoptive Emperors (155)
The Year of 5 Emperors (1)
The Severan Period (145)
Crisis and Decline (210)
The Secessionist Empires (14)
Recovery of the Empire (112)
The Tetrarchy (79)
Constantinian Era (167)
The Late Empire (99)
Roman Mints (807)
Roman Provincial (383)
Unofficial & Barbaric (12)
Roman Tesserae (1)
Roman Countermarked (1)
Roman Antiquities (65)
Roman Unattributed (25)
Roman Bulk Lots (23)
Roman Uncleaned (4)
Roman Coin Books (74)

Catalog Search
View Shopping Cart
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Contact Us
FAQ

Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheTwelveCaesars>Vespasian

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

After a successful campaign in Judaea (which he left to his son Titus to finish), Flavius Vespasianus was declared emperor by his troops at Alexandria in 69 A.D. Upon the defeat of Vitellius by the Danubian legions, Vespasian went to Rome and consolidated his power. He built the Colosseum and other important public works. Vespasian was popular, being both down to earth and possessed of great wit. He was responsible for the economic and military recovery of Rome, and is justly regarded as one of the greatest Roman emperors.


Judaean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa II, 55 - 95 A.D., Struck for Vespasian
Click for a larger photo Julius Marcus Agrippa was a teenager studying in Rome when his father died. He was too young to rule and his father's kingdom was made a Roman province. About 6 years later, he was given the kingdom of his uncle Herod of Chalcis. Later more was added. It was before Herod Agrippa II that Saint Paul was tried. Agrippa sided with the Romans during the Jewish rebellion. Though he continued to rule until at least 95 A.D., the temple was destroyed and in the end his assigned territories were in Syria, not Judaea.
SH90326. Bronze AE 30, RPC II 2283; Meshorer 166; Hendin 1288; AJC II 38, F, weight 15.554 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Panaeas mint, 75 - 76 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Vespasian right; reverse Tyche-Demeter standing left, kalathos on head, two grain ears in extended right, cornucopia in left, star upper left, ETOY − KZ BA / AΓPI−ΠΠA (year 27, King Agrippa) flanking in two lines across field; ex CNG auction 233 (26 May 2010), lot 292 and auction 75 (23 May 2007), lot 863.; $450.00 (337.50)

Click for a larger photo "Judaea Capta" issue. The reverse depicts Vespasian riding in the Judaea Capta triumph of 71 A.D. The Jewish historian Josephus was present at the festivities and noted, "It is impossible to do justice in the description of the number of things to be seen and to the magnificence of everything that met the eye...The greatest amazement was caused by the floats. Their size gave grounds for alarm about their stability, for many were three or four stories high..On one float the army could be seen pouring inside the walls, on another was a palace running with blood. Others showed defenseless men raising their hands in entreaty, firebrands being hurled at temples or buildings falling on their owners. On yet others were depicted rivers, which, after the destruction and desolation, flowed no longer through tilled fields providing water for men and cattle, but through a land on fire from end to end. It was to such miseries that the Jews doomed themselves by the war..Standing on his individual float was the commander of each of the captured cities showing the way he had been taken prisoner...Spoil in abundance was carried past. None of it compared with that taken from the Temple in Jerusalem...The procession was completed by Vespasian, and, behind him, Titus."
SH90666. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1559; RPC II 1931; RSC II 643; BMCRE II 512; BnF III 320; Hendin 1491; SRCV I 2279, VF, superb portrait, well centered but tight flan cuts off head on reverse, weight 3.457 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Vespasian driving triumphal quadriga right, branch and reins in right, scepter in left; $400.00 (300.00)

Click for a larger photo This type may refer to a victory on the Sea of Galilee during the recapture of Judaea.
RB68879. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 335; BMCRE II 617; Cohen 632; SRCV I -, F, well centered, nice green patina, small areas of corrosion on obv, weight 12.620 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, radiate head right; reverse VICTORIA NAVALIS, Victory standing right on a prow, wreath in right, palm frond over should in left, S C in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $350.00 (262.50)

Click for a larger photo On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av morns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
SH68916. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 2; Hendin 1479; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; SRCV I 2296, VF, weight 2.890 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse IVDAEA, Jewess seated right, mourning, veiled, supporting chin with left hand, trophy of captured arms behind her; $350.00 (262.50)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta
Click for a larger photo "Judaea Capta" issue. The reverse depicts Vespasian riding in the Judaea Capta triumph of 71 A.D. The Jewish historian Josephus was present at the festivities and noted, "It is impossible to do justice in the description of the number of things to be seen and to the magnificence of everything that met the eye...The greatest amazement was caused by the floats. Their size gave grounds for alarm about their stability, for many were three or four stories high..On one float the army could be seen pouring inside the walls, on another was a palace running with blood. Others showed defenseless men raising their hands in entreaty, firebrands being hurled at temples or buildings falling on their owners. On yet others were depicted rivers, which, after the destruction and desolation, flowed no longer through tilled fields providing water for men and cattle, but through a land on fire from end to end. It was to such miseries that the Jews doomed themselves by the war..Standing on his individual float was the commander of each of the captured cities showing the way he had been taken prisoner...Spoil in abundance was carried past. None of it compared with that taken from the Temple in Jerusalem...The procession was completed by Vespasian, and, behind him, Titus."
SH90665. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1559; RPC II 1931; RSC II 643; BMCRE II 512; BnF III 320; Hendin 1491; SRCV I 2279, VF, grainy surfaces (typical for the type), die crack at temple, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Vespasian driving triumphal quadriga right, branch and reins in right, scepter in left; ex Pecunem Gitbud & Naumann auction 2, lot 211; $350.00 (262.50)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta
Click for a larger photo This type celebrates the success of Vespasian and Titus in quelling the First Jewish Revolt. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
SH70113. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 2; Hendin 1479; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; SRCV I 2296, F, weight 2.673 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse IVDAEA, Jewess seated right, mourning, veiled, supporting chin with left hand, trophy of captured arms behind her; $250.00 (187.50)

Click for a larger photo The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"
RS90667. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 42 (R); BMCRE II 48; BnF III 35; RSC II 42; SRCV I 2281; Hunter I -, VF, weight 3.503 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, Jul - Dec 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse AVGVR (above) PON MAX (below), simpulum, sprinkler, jug and lituus; only one specimen in Reka Devnia hoard; rare; $250.00 (187.50)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Vespasian, in 70 A.D., and Titus, in the following year, had both safely returned to Rome by sea voyage. In thanks, this reverse type, copied from Octavian, was struck on coins of both Vespasian and Titus honoring Neptune under the name Redux.
RS90674. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1555 (C); BMCRE II 506; RPC II 1928; RSC II 274; BnF III 54; Hunter I 28; SRCV I 2276, VF, dark toning, upper reverse not fully struck, weight 3.402 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse NEP RED, Neptune standing left, nude, foot on globe, acrostolium in right, long scepter vertical in left; $200.00 (150.00)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta
Click for a larger photo On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av morns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
RB69590. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 1233; Hendin 1561; BMCRE II 845; BnF III 844; Giard Lyon 91; Cohen 240, Fair, over-cleaned and porous, weight 9.171 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS . . ., laureate head right; reverse IVDAEA CAPTA, Judaea seated right on cuirass, palm tree behind her, resting head on hand in mourning, pile of arms on left, S C in exergue; $150.00 (112.50)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo
In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales
RB90810. Copper quadrans, RIC II, part 1, 826 (R2); Cohen 347; SRCV I -, aVF, weight 2.447 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 75 A.D.; obverse IMP VESPASIAN AVG, rudder superimposed on globe; reverse P M TR P P P COS VIII S C, winged caduceus; ex CNG auction 236, part of lot 713; rare; $100.00 (75.00)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo
In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales
RB66470. Copper quadrans, RIC II, part 1, 1015 (R); Cohen 348; BMCRE II 740; SRCV I -, aF, weight 2.685 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMP VESPASIAN AVG, rudder on globe; reverse P M TR P P P COS VIII S C, winged caduceus; rare; $80.00 (60.00)

Vespasian, 25 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Koinon of Macedonia
Click for a larger photo The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and responsible for issuing coinage. Member cities sent representatives to participate in the popular assembly. The Koinon held celebrations and games annually at Beroea (modern Verria) in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor.
RP56116. Bronze AE 24, RPC II 334; Varbanov 3021; AMNG III 249; SGCV I 6; BMC Macedonia p. 27, 149 var (obv legend); SNG Cop 1334 var (same); Lindgren II 1358 var (same), F, weight 6.381 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, Thessalonica(?) mint, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPATΩP OYEΣΠAΣIANOΣ KAIΣAP, laureate head left; reverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ MAKE∆ONΩN, Macedonian shield; scarce; $60.00 (45.00)

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Click for a larger photo
In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales
RB67841. Copper quadrans, RIC II, part 1, 826 (R2); Cohen 347; SRCV I -, F, weight 2.861 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 75 A.D.; obverse IMP VESPASIAN AVG, rudder on globe; reverse P M TR P P P COS VIII S C, winged caduceus; rare; $50.00 (37.50)

Antioch, Roman Syria, 77 - 78 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 76 - 77, Trajan's father, M. Ulpius Traianus, was Governor of Syria (Legatus pro praetore Syriae). Trajan was also in Syria as Tribunus legionis.
RP62981. Bronze trichalkon, McAlee 118, RPC I 2020, SNG Cop 112, BMC Galatia 97, Fine, weight 5.394 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEΩN, turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right; reverse burning, garlanded altar, ET RKP (Caesarean Era year 126 ) in ex; scarce; $36.00 (27.00)


ITEMS PER PAGE 13510203050



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


Obverse legends:

CAESARVESPASIANVSAVG
DIVVSAVGVSTVSVESPASIANVS
DIVOAVGVESPSPQR
DIVOVESPASIANO
IMPCAESARAVGVESPASIANVS
IMPCAESARVESPASAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSII
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSIIITRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVGCOSIIITRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSVTRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASIAN
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVS
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSTRP
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVGCOSIII
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVGCOSIIII
IMPCAESARVESPAVG
IMPCAESARVESPAVGCOSVCENS
IMPCAESARVESPAVGVST
IMPCAESVESPASAVG
IMPCAESVESPASAVGPMTRPPPCSIII
IMPCAESVESPASAVGTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSIIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSVIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSVIIIPP
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGPMTRPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGPMTRPPPCOSVCENS
IMPCAESARVESPASCOSIIICENS
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVGPMTPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGCEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGCENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSIIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSVCENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSIIIICEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSVCEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTPCOSIIIICENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTRPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTRPIIIIPPCOSIIII
IMPVESPASAVGPMTRIPPPCOSIIII
IMPVESPASIANAVG
IMPVESPAVG
IMPVESPCAESAVGPONTMAXTRIBPOTCOSIIPP
IMPVESPCAESAVGPONTMAXTRIBPOTCOSIIIIPP
TCAESVESPASIANIMPPTRPCOSII




Average well preserved denarius weight 3.30 grams.
Catalog current as of Friday, October 31, 2014.
Page created in 2.574 seconds
Roman Coins of Vespasian