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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Republic ▸ 99-50 B.C.View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Republic, 99 - 50 B.C.

Roman Republic, C. Poblicius Q.f., 80 B.C.

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The control letters on this type are invariably the same on the obverse and reverse and several pairs of dies exist for each letter. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
RR74851. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 308, Sydenham 768, Crawford 380/1, RSC I Poblicia 9, F, rough, weight 3.201 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 80 B.C.; obverse ROMA, bust of Roma right, draped, wearing Phrygian helmet with side-feathers, O above; reverse C·POBLICI·Q·F, Hercules naked standing left, strangling the Nemean lion, club at feet, O (control letter) and bow with arrows in case on left; $17.50 (€15.23)


Roman Republic, C. Piso L.f. Frugi, 67 - 60 B.C.

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Gaius was married to Cicero's daughter, Tullia, in 63 B.C. and he was questor in 58 B.C. This type copies an issue of his father, Lucius Piso Frugi, c. 90 B.C. Crawford dates this type to 67 B.C. Sydenham and Grueber date it 64 B.C. Sear notes that hoard evidence indicates a date closer to 60 B.C.
RR74703. Silver denarius, RSC I Calpurnia 24, Sydenham 851, Crawford 408/1b, SRCV I 348, F, rough, weight 3.427 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 61 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo right, hair tied with band, uncertain control mark behind; reverse nude horseman galloping right, palm over shoulder in left, C PISO LF FRVGI below; $16.00 (€13.92)


Roman Republic, C. Norbanus, 83 B.C.

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In 83 B.C., Sulla returned from Greece and defeated the popular forces led by the consul Norbanus (probably the father of this moneyer). The reverse type alludes to the elder Norbanus' activity during the Social War, when he raised troops, organized a fleet, and provisioned the town of Rhegium.
RR74438. Silver denarius, RSC I Norbana 2, Sydenham 739, Crawford 357/1b, BMCRR I Rome 2810, SRCV I 278, F, weight 3.510 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 83 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Venus right, wearing single drop earring and pearl necklace, CXIIII (114, control number) behind, C•NORBANVS below; reverse fasces between grain ear on left and caduceus on right; $85.00 (€73.95)


Roman Republic, L. Farsuleius Mensor, 75 B.C.

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RSC notes, " The type may allude to the Lex Julia (B.C. 90) by which the rights of citizenship was granted to all Italians." Sydenham and Crawford both indicate the historical allusion is uncertain.
RR74091. Silver denarius, SRCV 328, RSC I Farsuleia 1, Sydenham 789a, Crawford 392/1a, F, holed and plugged, light scrape, weight 3.500 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 75 B.C.; obverse draped and diademed bust of Libertas right, S•C below chin, xxx[...] (control number) above pileus behind, MENSOR before; reverse helmeted warrior standing facing in biga right, head left, extending right hand to assist citizen into biga, reins and spear in left, scorpion below horse's forelegs, L•FARSVLEI in exergue; $90.00 (€78.30)


Roman Republic, Mn Fonteius C.f., c. 85 B.C.

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Vejovis is a little-known Italian deity. He was worshiped in a temple on the Capitol in Rome. The reverse most likely depicts a statue that was beside the statue of Vejovis in the temple. This statue may refer to the infancy of Jupiter who was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
RR73675. Silver denarius, RSC I Fonteia 9, Sydenham 724, BMCRR 2476, Crawford 353/1a, SRCV I 271, aVF, well centered, spotty toning, weight 3.939 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, c. 85 B.C.; obverse MN FONTEI C F (MN and NT in monogram), laureate head of Vejovis right, thunderbolt below, Roma monogram below chin; reverse Cupid seated on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus of Bacchus in ex, all within laurel wreath; $105.00 (€91.35)


Roman Republic, L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus, 89 B.C.

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This moneyer traced his descent from the Sabines and perhaps from King Tatius himself. Tarpeia was daughter of the commander of the citadel in Rome. She offered to open the gates for the besieging Sabines, if they would give her what they wore on their left arms, meaning their gold bracelets. The Sabines were unable to enter the citadel; its open gates were miraculously protected by boiling jets of water created by Janus. Keeping their promise, the Sabines threw the shields they worn on their left arms upon Tarpeia, crushing her to death, and then they kicked her off a cliff. This myth was likely used to explain the Tarpeian Rock, a cliff on the Capitoline Hill from which murderers and traitors were thrown.
RR72957. Silver denarius, Crawford 344/2b, RSC I Tituria 4, Sydenham 699, BMCRR I Rome 2328, SRCV I 251, VF, toned, weight 3.799 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 89 B.C.; obverse bare head of Sabine King Tatius right, palm frond below chin, SABIN behind; reverse Tarpeia buried to her waist in shields, trying to repel soldiers who are about to cast shields upon her, star over and within crescent with horns up above, left TITVRI in exergue; $150.00 (€130.50)


Roman Republic, T. Vettius Sabinus, 70 B.C.

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The moneyer's name and head of King Tatius on this denarius indicate the Sabine origins of the moneyer's family.
RR73527. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 339, Sydenham 905, Crawford 404/1, RSC I Vettia 2, BMCRR Rome 3370, gVF, attractive coin, weight 3.890 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 70 B.C.; obverse bare head of Sabine King Tatius right, TA monogram (Tatius) below, SABINVS behind, S C (Senatus Consulto) before; reverse magistrate in slow biga left holding staff, stalk of grain behind, IVDEX above, T•VETTIVS in ex; scarce; $360.00 (€313.20)


Roman Republic, Mn Fonteius C.f., c. 85 B.C.

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Vejovis is a little-known Italian deity. He was worshiped in a temple on the Capitol in Rome. The reverse most likely depicts a statue that was beside the statue of Vejovis in the temple. This statue may refer to the infancy of Jupiter who was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
RR73465. Silver denarius, RSC I Fonteia 9, Sydenham 724, BMCRR 2476, Crawford 353/1a, SRCV I 271, gVF, broad flan, porosity, minor encrustations and marks, weight 3.494 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 85 B.C.; obverse MN FONTEI C F (MN and NT in monogram), laureate head of Vejovis right, thunderbolt below, Roma monogram below chin; reverse Cupid seated on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus of Bacchus in ex, all within laurel wreath; $165.00 (€143.55)


Roman Republic, L. Marcius Censorinus, 82 B.C.

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The moneyer selected the design to play on his name, Marsyas sounds like Marcius.

Marsyas found Athena's flute. Inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully. Foolishly he challenged Apollo to a musical contest. Apollo won by singing to the music of his lyre. As a just punishment for his presumption, Apollo flayed Marsyas alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and his skin was hung like a wine bag in the cave out of which that river flows.
SH73011. Silver denarius, SRCV 281, Sydenham 737, Crawford 363/1, RSC I Marcia 24, VF, nice style, attractive iridescent toning, weight 3.650 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 82 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse the satyr Marsyas standing left with wine skin over shoulder, L·CENSOR before, a column topped with Victory behind; scarce; $380.00 (€330.60)


Athens, Attica, Greece, New Style Tetradrachm, c. 86 - 84 B.C., Issued by Sulla

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After 1 March 86 B.C., Sulla was the master of Athens. He recovered from the Pontic king Mithradates, who had taken it by force. This issue was struck for Sulla, either at Athens or outside Athens during the siege, to pay his legions and expenses during the war against Mithradates. The silver was collected from Greeks who supported the Romans against Mithradates and requisitioned from the sacred temple treasuries at Epidaurus, Olympia and Delphi. The ancients admired these Roman-Athenian coins and called them "flats of Lucullan." The MARKOY monogram may refer to Marcus the brother of the Roman general and politician Lucullus.
SH70948. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Thompson Athens 1293; Svoronos Athens pl. 78, 11; Dewing 1653; Boehringer AMUGS V, pp. 28-31 and pl. 9, 10; Kraay-Hirmer pl. 120, 366, gVF, attractive style, well struck, nicely toned, centered on a crowded slightly irregular shape flan, weight 16.581 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Athens mint, c. 86 - 84 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena Parthenos right, triple-crested helmet decorated with a griffin right above the raised earpiece, and protomes of horses above visor; reverse owl standing right on amphora on its side right, head facing, MARKOY monogram left, TAMIOY monogram right, A on amphora, all within olive wreath; ex John Jencek; rare; $2500.00 (€2175.00)







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REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, July 07, 2015.
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Roman Republic Coins of 99-50 B.C.