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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Republic ▸ 99-50 B.C.View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Republic, 99 - 50 B.C.

Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., c. 80 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter. Among her many attributes was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. This statue may the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
RR75236. Silver denarius, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1, aEF, obverse off center but only slightly detracting, uneven toning, marks, scratches, die wear, weight 3.695 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 135o, Italian mint, 80 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita (protector of women) standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake before her, L.PROCILI. / F downward in two rows behind; $180.00 (156.60)


Roman Republic, Ti. Claudius Ti. f. Ap.n. Nero, 79 B.C.

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The S C on the obverse stands for Senatus Consulto. This issue was authorized by Senate decree, most likely to pay for the extensive military operations during the dictator ship of Sulla. The obverse refers to the Sabine origin of the Claudius Gens. The control numbers run all the way to CLXX.
RR75237. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 310, Crawford 383/1, Sydenham 770a, RSC I Claudia 6, EF, light toning, a couple dark spots, scratch on cheek, reverse strike flat on highest points, weight 3.924 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 79 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Diana, bow and quiver over shoulder, SC before; reverse Victory in a biga right, raising wreath in right, palm and reins in left, AII (control number) below, TICLAVDTIF / AP N (VD and AP in monogram) in two lines in exergue; $290.00 (252.30)


Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., 80 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter. Among her many attributes was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. This statue may the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
RR75235. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 307, Sydenham 772, Crawford 379/2, RSC I Procilia 2, VF, weight 3.905 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Italian mint, 80 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita clad in goat skin right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita in a biga right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake below, L.PROCILI.F in exergue; $150.00 (130.50)


Click for a larger photo
In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter. Among her many attributes was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. This statue may the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
RR75304. Silver denarius, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1, EF, good reverse detail, light marks and scratches, some shallow pitting, tiny edge chip, weight 3.701 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 90o, Italian mint, 80 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita (protector of women) standing right, wearing goatskin with horns on her head, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake before her, L.PROCILI. / F downward in two rows behind; $180.00 (156.60)


Roman Republic, P. Furius Crassipes, 84 B.C.

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The clubfoot, crassipes in Latin, in a perfect example of typical Roman humor, replaces the moneyer's name in the obverse inscription. The chair refers to the moneyer's position as Aedile Curule. The turreted head probably indicates this special issue was authorized to finance a building project. Publius Fourius Crassipes is only known from his coins but he was probably the father of Fourius Crassipes who married Cicero's daughter, who became proquaestor in Sicily, and who struck bronze coins bearing his name at Panormus.
RR74525. Silver denarius, RSC I Furia 20, Sydenham 735, Crawford 356/1a, BMCRE I Rome 2604, SRCV I 275, VF, toned, obverse die wear, weight 4.155 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 84 B.C.; obverse AED CVR (downward on left), turreted head of Cybele right, clubfoot pointed upwards behind; reverse curule chair inscribed P FOVRIVS, CRASSIPES in exergue; $200.00 (174.00)


Roman Republic, C. Marius C.f. Capito, 81 B.C.

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Plowing with a yoke of oxen usually symbolized colonization. The ceremonial founding of a colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city. For this issue, the control numbers are always the same on both sides.
RR74529. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 300, Crawford 378/1c, Sydenham 744b, RSC I Maria 9, gVF, well centered, nicely toned, weight 3.921 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 81 B.C.; obverse CAPIT ┴XXXX (90, control number), draped bust of Ceres right, wreathed with grain, scorpion below chin; reverse plowman (priest?) conducting yoke of two oxen left, control number ┴XXXX (90, control number) above, CMARICF / SC in exergue; $250.00 (217.50)


Roman Republic, L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, 62 B.C.

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At the end of the Third Macedonian War (171 - 168 B.C.), King Perseus of Macedonia was decisively defeated by Rome at the Battle of Pydna. He surrendered to general Lucius Aemilius Paullus and was imprisoned in Rome with his half-brother Philippus and his son Alexander. The Antigonid kingdom was replaced with four republics, which were later dissolved and became the Roman province of Macedonia.
SH74531. Silver denarius, SRCV I 366, RSC I Aemilia 10, Crawford 415/1, Nice gVF, attractive coin, nice toning, some minor scratches and marks, small edge test cut, weight 3.901 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 150o, Rome mint, 62 B.C.; obverse PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, veiled and diademed head of Concordia right; reverse TER PAVLLVS, Paullus on right, standing left, togate, touching trophy in center; on the left, three standing bound captives: King Perseus of Macedonia, his half-brother, and his son; $300.00 (261.00)


Roman Republic, A. Postumius A.f. Sp. n. Albinus, c. 81 B.C.

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Refers to the praetorship of L. Postumius Albinus over Spain and his successful expeditions against the Vaccaei and Lusitani, and the levying of troops for this campaign.
RR74532. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 297, Sydenham 746, Crawford 372/2, RSC I Postumia 8, Nice VF, attractive style and toning, weight 3.757 g, maximum diameter 19.42 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 81 B.C.; obverse HISPAN behind veiled head of Hispania right with disheveled hair; reverse togate figure standing left extending hand toward legionary eagle before him, fasces and ax behind, A / ALBIN / NS vertical downward in fields from left to right, POST AF in exergue; $200.00 (174.00)


Roman Republic, M. Porcius Cato, 89 B.C.

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The seated figure on the reverse is presumably Victoria Virgo, whose shrine was built by Cato Censorious. This type was copied by Cato Uticensis in 47 - 46 B.C. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
RR74536. Silver denarius, SRCV I 247, Sydenham 596a, Crawford 343/1b, RSC I Porcia 5, Nice VF, attractive style and toning, weight 3.903 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 89 B.C.; obverse diademed female bust right, ROMA (MA ligate) behind, MCATO (AT ligate) below; reverse Victory seated right holding patera, VICTRIX (TR ligate) in exergue; $350.00 (304.50)


Roman Republic, Ti. Claudius Ti. f. Ap.n. Nero, 79 B.C.

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The S C on the obverse stands for Senatus Consulto. This issue was authorized by Senate decree, most likely to pay for the extensive military operations during the dictator ship of Sulla. The obverse refers to the Sabine origin of the Claudius Gens. The control numbers run all the way to CLXX.
RR74538. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 310, Crawford 383/1, Sydenham 770a, RSC I Claudia 6, gVF, toned, light marks, closed flan crack, weight 4.027 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 79 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Diana, bow and quiver over shoulder, SC before; reverse Victory in a biga right, raising wreath in right, palm and reins in left, AXXX (control number) below, TICLAVDTIF / AP N (VD and AP in monogram) in ex; $170.00 (147.90)










REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Thursday, September 03, 2015.
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Roman Republic Coins of 99-50 B.C.