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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Olympians ▸ Hera or JunoView Options:  |  |  |     

Hera or Juno

Queen of the Gods, and the goddess of marriage and motherhood. Symbols are the peacock and the cow. Daughter of Kronus and Rhea. Wife and sister of Zeus.


Pontos, Amisos, 300 - 125 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
SH71627. Silver drachm, SNG BM 1110 (same obverse die, reduced siglos), HGC 7 233 (R1), SNG Cop -, SNG Stancomb -, VF, coppery spots, weight 4.106 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, 300 - 125 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Hera-Tyche right, wearing a turreted stephanos; reverse owl standing facing on shield, wings open, C - Ξ / monogram (TAI?) - P flanking under wings; rare; $300.00 (261.00)


Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., c. 80 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter. Among her many attributes was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. This statue may the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
SH73137. Silver denarius, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1, EF, some die wear, weight 3.937 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Italian mint, 80 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita (protector of women) standing right, wearing goatskin with horns on her head, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake before her, L.PROCILI. / F downward in two rows behind; $270.00 (234.90)


Severina, Augusta Spring 274 - November 275 A.D.

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This type is sometimes attributed as an as, but it is more likely a reduced sesterius.
SH65365. Bronze sestertius, RIC V 7, Cohen 9, SRCV III 11711, VF, weight 8.682 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 274 A.D.; obverse SEVERINA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse IVNO REGINA, Juno standing slightly left, head left, patera in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, peacock left at feet on left; $225.00 (195.75)


Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., c. 80 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter. Among her many attributes was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. This statue may the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
RR75236. Silver denarius, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1, aEF, obverse off center but only slightly detracting, uneven toning, marks, scratches, die wear, weight 3.695 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 135o, Italian mint, 80 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita (protector of women) standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake before her, L.PROCILI. / F downward in two rows behind; $180.00 (156.60)


Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., c. 80 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter. Among her many attributes was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. This statue may the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
RR75304. Silver denarius, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1, EF, good reverse detail, light marks and scratches, some shallow pitting, tiny edge chip, weight 3.701 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 90o, Italian mint, 80 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita (protector of women) standing right, wearing goatskin with horns on her head, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake before her, L.PROCILI. / F downward in two rows behind; $180.00 (156.60)


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

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Juno was the patron deity of Trebonianus Gallus. The epithet Martialis literally means "of or belonging to Mars" or "warlike," but the depictions of Juno Martialis on the coins are not warlike. The epithet may refer to Juno as the mother of Mars. Or perhaps she is Juno of March - her festival was on 7 March. Perhaps the title refers to her temple in the Campus Martius, the old "Field of Mars" down by the Tiber. She is sometimes equated with Juno Perusina, as Perugia was where Trebonianus Gallus came from, and as such is sometimes called Juno Martialis Perusina by modern scholars.
SH66386. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 110a corr. (peacock), Banti 14 corr. (same), Cohen V 50, SRCV III 9670, Hunter - (p. cv), VF, nice patina, attractive style, weight 13.008 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES C VIBIVS TREBONIANVS GALLVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse IVNONI MARTIALIS, Shrine of Juno Martialis: domed, distyle rotunda with Corinthian columns, garlands hanging below dome; statue of Juno seated facing within holding two stalks of grain in extended right; ex Triskeles Auction, lot 164, auction 2 (25 Apr 2013); $170.00 (147.90)


Roman Republic, L. Roscius Fabatus, 64 B.C.

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The reverse depicts the scene that occurred early at Lanuvium at the festival in honor of Juno Sospita, when a virgin descended into the grotto under the temple with food for the serpent who dwelt there. If the girl was chaste, she returned safely to her home, where there was much rejoicing.
RS74399. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 363, RSC I Roscia 3, Crawford 412/1, Sydenham 915, VF, well centered, some die wear, a little rough, weight 3.426 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 195o, Rome mint, 64 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita clad in goat skin, L ROSCI below, uncertain symbol behind; reverse maiden feeding erect snake before her, uncertain symbol behind, FABATI in exergue; $170.00 (147.90)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
RB73707. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 1028, Cohen II 38, BMCRE III 1869, SRCV II 3934, Hunter II -, gF, spots of patina flaking, small areas of corrosion, cleaning scratches, weight 24.517 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 132 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA HADRAINI AVG P P, diademed and draped bust right; reverse IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left, patera extended in right, scepter in left, S - C flanking across field below center; ex Forum (2009); scarce; $165.00 (143.55)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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In 213, Caracalla summoned Abgar IX Severus, the king of Edessa, to Rome and had him murdered. A year later the Kingdom of Edessa was incorporated into the empire as a Roman province.
RS72358. Silver denarius, RIC IV 236; RSC III 166; BMCRE V p. 441, 62; cf. SRCV II 6821 (obv legend); Hunter III 15 (same), Choice VF, excellent centering, light toning, die break behind Caracalla's eye, weight 3.094 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, late 213 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate bearded head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex Timeline Auctions; $150.00 (130.50)


Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., 80 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Juno was the daughter of Saturn and the wife of Jupiter. Among her many attributes was Juno Sospita, who offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. This statue may the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
RR75235. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 307, Sydenham 772, Crawford 379/2, RSC I Procilia 2, VF, weight 3.905 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Italian mint, 80 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita clad in goat skin right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita in a biga right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake below, L.PROCILI.F in exergue; $150.00 (130.50)




    



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Hera or Juno