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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ MilitaryView Options:  |  |  |   

Military, Combat & Arms on Ancient Coins

Roman Civil Wars, Revolt of Galba, Governor of Spain, April - June 68 A.D.

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Galba lived in Tarraco for eight years. This coin was issued by Galba as governor of Spain in revolt against Nero. The obverse is copied from Republican denarii struck in 62 B.C. by the moneyer L. Scribonius Libo.
SH63560. Silver denarius, RIC I 9 (R4), RSC II 396, BMCRE I 9, SRCV I 2072, F, toned, weight 3.515 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 225o, Tarraco(?) mint, Apr - Jun 68 A.D.; obverse BON EVENT, young female head (Bonus Eventus) right, fillet around forehead; reverse ROM RENASC, Roma standing right in military garb, Victory on globe in right hand, eagle-tipped scepter over left shoulder in left; bargain priced for this interesting R4 rarity implying the restoration of the Republic!, from the Jyrki Muona Collection; very rare (R4); $1170.00 (1041.30)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Ephesus peaked during the 1st and 2nd century A.D. when it was second in importance and size only to Rome, with a population estimated at 400,000 to 500,000 in 100 A.D. The city was famous for the Temple of Artemis, the Library of Celsus, and its theater, seating 25,000 spectators. Ephesus also had several large bath complexes and one of the most advanced aqueduct systems in the ancient world. Water powered numerous mills, one of which has been identified as a sawmill for marble. The city and temple were destroyed by the Goths in 263 A.D., marking the decline of the city's splendor.
RS77202. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1457; BMCRE II 475; RSC II 277; RPC II 853, gVF, excellent portrait, toned, some luster in recesses, tight flan, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.275 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, Ephesus mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P, laureate head right; reverse PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory advancing right, filleted wreath raised in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; star lower right, annulet below; very rare; $1000.00 (890.00)


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D.

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This Victory type was likely struck in anticipation of the upcoming war with Vitellius. One of Galba's latest reverse types is identical except for the legend: VICTORIA P R instead of VICTORIA OTHONIS. Several Otho coins struck with what appear to be re-cut Galba reverse dies are known.
SH72953. Silver denarius, RIC I 17, RSC II 24a, BMCRE I 25, BnF III -, SRCV I -, aVF, nice portrait, toned, light scrape on obverse, weight 3.282 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 15 Jan - Feb 69 A.D.; obverse IMP M OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P, bare head right; reverse VICTORIA OTHONIS, Victory standing left on globe, wreath extended in right, palm frond in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Angel Fernandez; 17/1000 coins of this type in Jyrki Muona' Otho die-study; very rare; $900.00 (801.00)


Balbinus, 22 April - 29 July 238 A.D.

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Balbinus was elected along with Pupienus to end the reign of the brutal Maximinus. A military stalemate ensued, until Maximinus was murdered by his own troops. The population and the Praetorian guard held little respect for the two ex-senators, however, and they were murdered after a reign of only 99 days.
SH77281. Silver denarius, RIC IV 8, RSC III 27, BMCRE VI 37, SRCV III 8491, VF, excellent portrait, toned, weight 3.036 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 1st emission; obverse IMP C D CAEL BALBINVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGG, Victory standing facing, head left, raising wreath in right, palm frond in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Harlan J. Berk; scarce; $900.00 (801.00)


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D.

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This Victory type was likely struck in anticipation of the upcoming war with Vitellius.
SH72952. Silver denarius, RIC I 16, RSC II 24, BMCRE I 24, BnF III 21, SRCV I 2165, F, nice style portrait and reverse, attractive toning, porous, weight 3.038 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 15 Jan - Feb 69 A.D.; obverse IMP M OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P, bare head right; reverse VICTORIA OTHONIS, Victory walking left, wreath extended in right, palm frond in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, 23/1000 coins of this type in Jyrki Muona' Otho die-study; very rare (RIC R3); $800.00 (712.00)


Taras, Calabria, Italy, c. 272 - 240 B.C.

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Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta). These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer needed, their citizenship was retroactively nullified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon. This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.
SH75331. Silver nomos, SNG Cop 927, Vlasto 890, HN Italy 1037, gVF, fine style, well centered on a tight flan, toned, some marks, scratches, and light corrosion, weight 6.332 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, Taras (Taranto, Italy) mint, c. 272 - 240 BC; obverse |−HPAK/ΛHTOΣ below, helmeted and cuirassed warrior on horseback right, shield on his back, transverse spear downward in right hand; reverse TAPAΣ, Phalanthos on dolphin left, flower in extended right, cornucopia in left hand, EΓ monogram and thymiaterion (incense burner) behind; $670.00 (596.30)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG II

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This may have been II Sabina, disbanded by Augustus. The well-known II Augusta, which took part in the conquest of Britain and was later stationed in South Wales, was one of Octavian's legions, and so not likely to be the Second Legion referred to on this coin. Other Second Legions (Adiutrix, Italica, Parthica and Traiana) were raised much later in imperial times.
SH76924. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27, Sear CRI 349, gVF, well struck, toned, crowded flan, marks and scratches, weight 3.521 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - II, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Germania Inferior Numismatics; $550.00 (489.50)


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 140 - 175 A.D.

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King Minos demanded that, every ninth year, Athens send seven boys and seven girls to Crete to be devoured by the Minotaur, a half-man, half-bull monster that lived in the Labyrinth. Theseus, son of Aigeus, the king of Athens, volunteered to take the place of one of the youths and slay the monster to stop this horror. Upon his arrival to Crete, Ariadne, King Minos' daughter, fell in love with him and gave him a ball of thread to help him find his way out of the Labyrinth. Theseus promised Ariadne that if he escaped he would take her with him. Using the string to mark his path, he made his way to the heart of the Labyrinth, slew the Minotaur, followed the string out, and then rescued the Athenian boys and girls. Athena told Theseus to leave Ariadne and Phaedra behind on the beach. Distressed by his broken heart, Theseus forgot to put up the white sails that were to signal his success. Upon seeing black sails, his father committed suicide, throwing himself off a cliff into the sea, causing this body of water to be named the Aegean.
GB77873. Bronze drachm, BMC Attica p. 105, 764; SNG Cop 341; Svoronos Athens, pl. 96, 1; Kroll 276, aF, corrosion, weight 7.132 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Athens mint, pseudo-autonomous under Rome, c. 140 - 175 A.D.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse AΘHNAIΩN, Theseus right, preparing to slay the Minotaur, nude, planting knee on the back of Minotaur, raising club in his right hand, a horn of the Minotaur in his left hand, the Minotaur falling right on left knee; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren (Antioch Associates); very rare; $500.00 (445.00)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XI

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This may have been a legion raised by Antony and disbanded by Augustus. The XI Claudia, an old legion of Caesar's, fought for Octavian (and won the title Actiaca at the battle of Actium).
SL79267. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/25, Sydenham 1229, BMCRR II East 203, RSC I 39, NGC F, strike 3/5, surface 2/5, banker's marks (2400602-008), toned, weight 3.48 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; NGC certified (slabbed); $500.00 (445.00)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XII

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This old Caesarean legion was known at different times as Victrix, Antiquae, Paterna and finally XII Fulminata ('the thunderers'). Its veterans settled (among other places) in Patras in Greece. After fighting without great distinction in the First Jewish Revolt, the legion was transferred to Melitene in Cappadocia, where it remained for several hundred years.
RR76782. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/20, Sydenham 1224, BMCRR II East 198, RSC I 34, VF, toned, contact marks, graffiti, weight 3.561 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XII, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $450.00 (400.50)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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The RomanParthian War of 161 - 166 was fought between the Roman and Parthian Empires over Armenia and Upper Mesopotamia. In 166, the Romans made successful campaigns into lower Mesopotamia and Media, and sacked Ctesiphon, the Parthian capital. The Romans were be victorious but the returning army brought back a pandemic known as the Antonine Plague. The plague significantly depopulated the entire Roman Empire.
SH76376. Silver denarius, RIC III 163a, RSC II 878, BMCRE IV 406, Hunter II 33, SRCV II 4933, Choice VF, excellent centering and bold strike, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.079 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, summer - Dec 166 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right; reverse TR P XX IMP IIII COS III, Victory standing slightly left, head right, palm frond vertical in right hand, shield inscribed VIC PAR set on palm tree in left hand; from the Scott Collection; $450.00 (400.50)


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.

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In the spring of 68, Galba was informed of Nero's intention to put him to death. On 2 April 68, at Carthago Nova, Galba declared himself the "representative of the Roman people" and received salutation by the troops as Imperator. This was not quite a claim to the throne, but was clearly rebellion. This rare denarius is from a small issue struck in Gaul during the period after Galba's salutation as imperator, but before his recognition as Augustus in mid-June. On the reverse Galba claims he will achieve Victory for the Roman people.
BB76887. Silver denarius, RIC I 111 (R2), BMCRE I 227, RSC II 322, BnF III -, Hunter I -, SRCV I -, aVF, toned, scratch, light corrosion, weight 3.352 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Gaul (Narbo?) mint, c. 10 April - mid Jun 68 A.D.; obverse SER GALBA IMPERATOR (counter-clockwise from lower right), laureate and draped bust right; reverse VICTORIA P R (counter-clockwise from upper left), Victory standing left on globe, wreath in right hand, palm frond in her left; rare; $400.00 (356.00)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

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This type refers to military campaign successes in northern Britain. Geta and Caracalla accompanied their father to Britain and when Geta was promoted to Augustus, it was the first time ever three emperors had ruled. Geta primarily remained in Eburacum (York) and London serving in an administrative role.
RS76963. Silver denarius, RIC IV 91 (S); BMCRE V p. 369, 67; RSC III 220; SRCV II 7255; Hunter III -, Choice EF, superb portrait, well centered, slight die wear, weight 3.135 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, Rome mint, 210 A.D.; obverse P SEPT GETA PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate and bearded head right; reverse VICTORIAE BRIT, Victory advancing right, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; $400.00 (356.00)


Johannes, 20 November 423 - May 425 A.D.

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Johannes was primicerius notariorum (senior civil servant) for Honorius and seized the throne of the Western Roman Empire upon Honorius' death. Johannes issued coins for Theodosius II and attempted to negociate his position. Theodosius II refused to recognize him, elevated Valentinian III to Augustus, and marched into Italy at the head of a formidable army. Johannes was captured at Ravenna in early summer 425 A.D., tortured, mutilated, exhibited in the circus mounted on an ass and executed.
RL77210. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X 1923 (R3), LRBC II 838, SRCV V 21122, Hunter V -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, weight 0.89 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, 2nd officina, Rome mint, obverse D N IOHANNES P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory walking left, trophy over right shoulder in right, dragging captive with left, staurogram (P) in left field, RMS in exergue; very rare; $400.00 (356.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

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This type celebrates the success of Vespasian and Titus in quelling the First Jewish Revolt. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
RS79260. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 2; Hendin 1479; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; Hunter I 18; SRCV I 2296, F, excellent centering, toned, weight 3.044 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse IVDAEA, Jewess seated right, mourning, veiled, supporting chin with left hand, trophy of captured arms behind her; $400.00 (356.00)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG V

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Struck by Antony and Cleopatra at Patrae while preparing for the struggle with Octavian. Twenty-three different legions are named on coins of this issue. This may have been the famous V Alaudae ('the larks'), a Caesarean legion which remained loyal to Antony but was later retained by Augustus. There are other possibilities, however: V Macedonica, a Caesarean legion about which little is known; V Urbana, disbanded after Actium (and therefore quite likely an Antonian legion); and V Gallica, a Caesarean legion that was probably the one that under Lollius lost its eagle to German raiders in Gaul in 17 B.C.
SH77472. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/18, Sydenham 1221, BMCRR II East 196, RSC I 32, Sear CRI 354, VF, toned, minor flan flaw on obverse, light scratches, weight 3.401 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, Patrae mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT AVG III. VIR. R. P. C., galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - V, legionary aquila between two standards; $375.00 (333.75)


Thebes, Boiotia, Greece, 405 - 395 B.C.

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The largest city in Boeotia, leader of the Boeotian confederacy, and rival of Athens, Thebes sided with Persia during Xerxes' invasion in 480 B.C. Thebes ended Sparta's power of at the Battle of Leuctra in 371. The Sacred Band of Thebes famously fell to Philip II at Chaeronea in 338. After a revolt in 335, Alexander the Great destroyed the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.
GS74435. Silver tetartemorion, BCD Boiotia 466; BMC Central p. 77, 87; SNG Cop 294; Brend Fractions 35; Head Boeotia 37, Choice VF, toned, weight 0.163 g, maximum diameter 6.4 mm, Thebes mint, 405 - 395 B.C.; obverse Boiotian ox hide shield; reverse bunch of grapes on stem, Θ−E flanking above; ex BCD Collection; $360.00 (320.40)


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
SH79745. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 130, HGC 9 18a, F, toned, grainy, scratches, weight 15.041 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukia on the Tigris II mint, c. 296 - 280 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Athena fighting in a biga of horned elephants right, wearing helmet, javelin in her right hand, shield on her left arm, BAΣIΛEΩΣ curved upward on left, ΣEΛEYKOY in exergue, obscure control symbols above elephants and perhaps in exergue; $360.00 (320.40)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 278, Probus defeated the Alamanni, expelled the Franks from Gaul, reorganized the defenses on the Rhine, resettled the Germanic tribes in the devastated provinces of the Roman Empire, and adopted the titles of Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus.
RA76279. Silvered antoninianus, Pink VI-1, p. 63; RIC, part 2, V 376 (S) var. (cuirass); Cohen VI 283 var. (same); Hunter IV 131 var. (same, and obv legend); SRCV III 11984 (same), Choice aEF, some mint luster, most silvering remains, fantastic heroic bust, light corrosion, weight 3.341 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 4 emission, 278 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, radiate bust left from behind, spear left in right hand, back bare but for balteus over right shoulder and rectangular Aegis shield with square corner in on left shoulder; reverse HERCVLI PACIF, Hercules standing left, raising branch in extended right, club and Nemean Lion skin in left, VXXT in exergue; very rare; $315.00 (280.35)


Roman Republic, M. Porcius Cato, 89 B.C.

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The seated figure on the reverse is presumably Victoria Virgo, whose shrine was built by Cato Censorious. This type was copied by Cato Uticensis in 47 - 46 B.C. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
RR74536. Silver denarius, SRCV I 247, Sydenham 596a, Crawford 343/1b, RSC I Porcia 5, Nice VF, attractive style and toning, weight 3.903 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 89 B.C.; obverse diademed female bust right, ROMA (MA ligate) behind, MCATO (AT ligate) below; reverse Victory seated right holding patera, VICTRIX (TR ligate) in exergue; $315.00 (280.35)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta Issue

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This type celebrates the success of Vespasian and Titus in quelling the First Jewish Revolt. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues. RIC lists this type as common; we think in error. This is the first example of the type handled by Forum.
RS77388. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1120; RSC II 243; Hendin 1488; BMCRE II 388; BnF III 297; Hunter I 161; SRCV I 2262, aF, toned, light scratches, weight 3.179 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG TR P, laureate head right; reverse IVDAEA DEVICTA (Judaea Defeated), Jewess standing left, draped, head slightly bowed, hands tied in front of her, date palm tree behind her; ex Pecunem Numismatik Naumann auction 36, lot 622; rare; $310.00 (275.90)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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This type is apparently unpublished and this is the only example of the type known to Forum. This reverse was used for very rare (both R5) issues of Licinius I and Licinius II Caesar. CNG e-auction 368, lot 496, is Constantine II with this same reverse, also 5th officina, but with Constantine II on on the obverse left holding a Victory on globe and mappa.
RL76392. Billon centenionalis, apparently unpublished, cf. RIC VII 116 - 117 (for obv. type) and 138 - 139 (for rev. type, issues of the Licinii), EF, excellent portrait, both sides slightly off center, left side of reverse legend weak, some porosity, a few light marks, weight 2.773 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, as caesar, 320 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left; reverse VIRTVS EXERCIT, vexillum inscribed VOT / XX in two lines, two seated barbarian captives back-to-back flanking base, Christogram (Chi Rho monogram) left, ESIS star in exergue; ex Scott Collection; extremely rare; $300.00 (267.00)


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

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On 28 September 351, at the Battle of Mursa Major, Constantius II defeated the usurper Magnentius. The battle was one of the bloodiest in Roman military history. During the fighting Marcellinus, a general of Magnentius was killed, but Magnentius himself survived.
RL77938. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Amiens 23 (S), LRBC II 13, Bastien Lyon 125 (8 spec.), SRCV V 18817, Cohen VII 69, aEF, weight 4.031 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 45o, Ambianum (Amiens, France) mint, Spring 351 - 18 Aug 353 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE, two Victories standing confronted, together holding wreath containing VOT V MVLT X in four lines, staurogram (rho-cross) above, AMB and crescent in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren, ex Frank S. Robinson; scarce; $300.00 (267.00)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign, or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RA76334. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 904 (S); Cohen VI 69; Pink VI-1, p. 43; Hunter IV 311 var. (1st officina); cf. SRCV III 11195 (Rome mint, etc.), gVF, green patina with some silvering remaining, weight 4.393 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, 2nd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 2nd emission, end 276 - beginning 277 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, radiate, helmeted, and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over right shoulder, oval shield decorated with charging horseman on left arm; reverse ADVENTVS PROBI AVG, Probus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left hand, horses' right foreleg raised over bound captive seated left, B in exergue; scarce; $280.00 (249.20)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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In Greek mythology, the Amazons were a nation of all-female warriors. Herodotus placed them in a region bordering Scythia in Sarmatia (in modern Ukraine). Other historiographers placed them in Anatolia or in Libya.
RS77244. Silver denarius, RIC II 76a, RSC II 1108, BMCRE II 147, Strack II 122, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, VF, nice portrait, light bumps and marks, edge cracks, weight 3.271 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse P M TR P COS III, Roma standing slightly left, head left, wearing crested helmet, dressed as Amazon in short tunic, Victory in right hand, vertical spear in left hand; $280.00 (249.20)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG III

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This legion was probably Caesar's old III Gallica, which fought for Antony. Another possibility is III Cyrenaica, which was perhaps taken over from Lepidus. The III Augusta was probably an Octavian legion.
RR73643. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/15, Sydenham 1217, BMCRR II East 193, RSC I 28, Sear CRI 350, aVF, weight 3.378 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis ,180o, Patrae(?) mint, fall 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - III, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $270.00 (240.30)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Most people expect the crests on ancient helmets to strictly run from front to back. Officer's helmets, however, frequently had a crest running from ear to ear, as on the helmet used as a control symbol on the reverse of this coin. The two ear flaps dangle below the bowl and visor of the helmet.
SH75314. Silver tetradrachm, Meydancikkale 618 (same obv. die); Mathisen, Administrative VI.1, obv. die A1; Price 629; Mller Alexander 233; SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, centered, golden toning, test cut, light scratches and marks, lamination defect on reverse, weight 16.793 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 90o, Pella (or Amphipolis?) mint, c. 275 - 270 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Atophoros enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing on left, ΠAP monogram under seat strut, KE monogram in exergue; ex CNG auction 349, lot 35; $250.00 (222.50)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Ephesus, Ionia is the church that had forsaken its first love (Revelation 2:1-7).
RS76092. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1412 (R); RSC II 278a; RPC II 820, VF, fantastic portrait, dark toning, well centered on a tight flan, tiny flan cracks, weight 3.099 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesus mint, 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P, laureate head right; reverse PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory walking left, wreath in extended right, palm frond in left, Φ lower left (unstruck); rare; $250.00 (222.50)


Decentius, Caesar, July or August 350 - 18 August 353 A.D.

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Bastien recorded only a single specimen, RIC VIII notes another in the British Museum. We know of a few more examples.
RL77937. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Trier 313 (R), Bastien 65 (1 spec.), LRBC II 59, SRCV V 18886, Cohen VIII 37, gVF, well centered, nice portrait, edge cracks, spots of light corrosion, light marks, weight 4.810 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, 1sto officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, Jan 351 - Aug 352 A.D.; obverse D N DECENTIVS FORT CAES, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from front, A behind; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, two Victories standing confronted, holding between them a wreath inscribed VOT X MVLT X in four lines within, TRP in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren, ex Frank S. Robinson; very rare; $250.00 (222.50)


Sextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet, executed 35 B.C.

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Struck in Sicily by Sextus Pompey, the younger son of Pompey the Great. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus on 3 September 36 B.C. and executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.
SH79738. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1391, RSC I 1a ( Pompeia 21), BMC Sicily 15, Sydenham 1347, Crawford 511/2b, S 1391, F, toned, weight 3.344 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 90o, Sicilian mint, 42 B.C.; obverse MAG PIVS IMP ITER, diademed head of Neptune right, trident behind; reverse PRF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C, naval trophy of captured arms placed on anchor, trophy made of trident, cuirass, helmet, stem of prow, apluster, and heads of Scylla and Charybdis; $250.00 (222.50)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

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In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL90446. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 286 (S), LRBC II 1173, Voetter 51, SRCV V 18203, VF, well centered, slightly rough green patina, coppery high-points, weight 4.749 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star before; reverse HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, Constantius standing facing head left, holding labarum (Chi Rho Christogram standard) and spear, Victory right crowning him, A left, ASIS in exergue (A's often appear as H in this period); scarce; $240.00 (213.60)


Macrinus and Diadumenian, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

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Renamed by Trajan after his sister, Ulpia Marciana, Marcianopolis was an important strategic center for centuries. The city was repeatedly destroyed by barbarian raids (Goths, Huns, Avars and others) but also was repeatedly rebuilt and prospered. During Valens' conflict with the Goths, Marcianopolis was a temporary capital of the empire and the largest city in Thrace. An Avar raid destroyed the city in 614 or 615.
RP70334. Bronze pentassarion, H-J Marcianopolis 6.24.34.2, AMNG I/I 778, Varbanov I 1290, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, attractive green patina, a few minor scratches, flan crack, centration dimples, weight 10.894 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Pontianus, 217 - 218 A.D.; obverse AYT K OΠEΛ CEYH MAKPEINOC K M OΠEΛ ANTΩNEINOC, laureate head of Macrinus right confronted with bare-head of Diadumenian left; reverse YΠ ΠONTIANOY MAPKIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Macrinus standing left, laureate, wearing military garb, right foot on helmet, Victory on globe offering wreath in his right hand, reversed spear vertical in left hand, two oval shields at feet on left, E in left field; ex CNG e-auction 278, lot 179; $240.00 (213.60)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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This type may commemorate a victory on the Sea of Galilee during the recapture of Judaea.
RB68879. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 335; BMCRE II 617; Cohen I 632; Hunter I 119 var. (S - C, low across field); SRCV I -, F, well centered, nice green patina, small areas of corrosion on obv, weight 12.620 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, radiate head right; reverse VICTORIA NAVALIS, Victory standing right on a prow, wreath in right, palm frond over should in left, S C in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $225.00 (200.25)


Kingdom of Thrace, Rhoemetalkes I, c. 11 B.C. - 12 A.D.

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When the Cotys VII, King of Thrace, died about 48 B.C. Rhoemetalces I became the guardian of his nephew Rhescuporis I, his brother's young son and heir. In 13 B.C., Rhescuporis I was defeated and slain in battle by Vologases, chief of the Thracian Bessi, who was leading a revolt against Rome. As Rhescuporis I had left no heir, Rhoemetalces became king. An ally of Augustus, the Roman Historian Tacitus described Rhoemetalces as attractive and civilized. After his death, Augustus divided his realm, half for his son Cotys VIII and the other half for Rhoemetalces' brother Rhescuporis II. Tacitus states that Cotys received the cultivated parts, most towns and most Greek cities of Thrace, while Rhescuporis received the wild and savage portion with enemies on its frontier.
RP72883. Bronze AE 15, Youroukova 159, RPC I 1707, BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, SNG Stancomb -, VF, weight 1.999 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 225o, c. 11 B.C. - 12 A.D.; obverse K ΣEBAΣTOY, capricorn right, globe upper right between legs; reverse POIMH, Nike advancing right, raising wreath in extended right, grounded palm frond before her in left; rare; $225.00 (200.25)


Carinus, First Half 283 - Spring 285 A.D.

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When this coin was struck in 282, Carinus was still the Prince of Youth, full of promise. Later he would be remembered as one of the worst Roman emperors. This infamy is, however, likely part fiction, supported by Diocletian himself. For example, the (unreliable) Historia Augusta has Carinus marrying nine wives, while neglecting to mention his only real wife, Magnia Urbica, by whom he had a son, Nigrinianus. After his death, Carinus' memory was officially condemned in the Roman proceeding known as Damnatio Memoriae. His name, along with that of his wife, was erased from inscriptions.
RS71588. Silvered antoninianus, Venra Hoard IV 390 (LV 4227); RIC V, part 2, 182; Cohen VI 97; Hunter III 71; Pink VI-2, p. 28; SRCV III 12302, Choice EF, most silvering remains, well centered and struck, nice portrait, some porosity, weight 4.627 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 2nd issue as caesar, 282 - 283 A.D.; obverse M AVR CARINVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVT, Carinus standing left, globe in extended right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, bound captive seated left at feet on left, QXXI in exergue; $225.00 (200.25)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 85 - 65 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB76954. Bronze AE 20, BMC Pontus p. 20, 72; SNG BM 1187 var. (different monogram right); SNG Stancomb 688 ff. var. (different monograms); SNG Cop 167 ff. var. (same), VF, well centered on usual tight flan, nice green patina, minor flan adjustment marks, weight 8.426 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse aegis with facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) in center; reverse AMI−ΣOY, Nike advancing right, holding palm frond across shoulders behind, A∆T monogram lower left, AMTE monogram lower right; $225.00 (200.25)


Aitna, Sicily, The Kampanoi Mercenaries, c. 392 - 358 B.C.

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In 475 B.C. Hieron moved ten thousand settlers from Syracuse and Peloponnesus to Katane and renamed it Aetna. In 461, after Hieron's death, the new settlers were expelled. They moved to the southern slope of the volcano and founded a new Aetna. In 403 B.C., Dionysius the Elder made himself master of Aetna, where he settled his discharged Campanian mercenaries, the Kampanoi. The Kampanoi retained possession of Aitna until 339 B.C., when Timoleon took the city and put them to the sword. Under Rome, Aitna became a municipal town of considerable importance; its territory being one of the most fertile of all Sicily. The site of the city and time of its destruction are unknown today.
GI76936. Bronze AE 14, Calciati III, p. 327, 2 (Mercenaries at Aitna); HGC 2 1608 (R1, mercenaries at Tauromenion); SNG Morcom 877, VF, green patina, weight 2.744 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 60o, Aitna or Tauromenion mint, c. 344 - 339 B.C.; obverse Phrygian helmet with cheek guards, ornamented with a griffin, linear border; reverse KAM (Kampanoi?), AIT (Aitna?), or TA (Tauromenion?) monogram in laurel wreath; $220.00 (195.80)


Boiotia, Greece, Boiotian League, c. 225 - 171 B.C.

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After the destruction of Thebes by Alexander in 335 B.C., the Boeotians never again pursued independent policy, but followed protecting powers. Unable to defend its frontiers, the land became more than ever the "dancing-ground of Ares." Boeotia was generally loyal to Macedon, and supported its kings against Rome. Devastation during the First Mithridatic War was a death-blow to the country's prosperity. Rome dissolved the league, but it was revived under Augustus, and merged with the other central Greek federations in the Achaean synod. - Wikipedia
SH79751. Silver drachm, BCD Boiotia 127; Cop 387 var. (ΓAN monogram); BMC Central p. 42, 99 var. (same); Weber 3306 var. (different monogram), VF, nice style, light toning, some die wear, light marks, tiny punch or flan flaw inner right on reverse, weight 4.902 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 45o, Thebes(?) mint, c. 225 - 171 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Poseidon right; reverse Nike standing left, raising wreath in right, trident vertical behind in left, BOIΩTΩN downward on left, AN monogram inner left; rare variant; $220.00 (195.80)


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

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Aelia Flaccilla was a fervent supporter of the Nicene Creed. Sozomen reports her preventing a conference between Theodosius and Eunomius of Cyzicus who served as figurehead of Anomoeanism, a sect of Arians. Ambrose and Gregory of Nyssa praise her Christian virtue and comment on her role as "a leader of justice" and "pillar of the Church." She is commemorated as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church; her feast day is 14 September.
RL70543. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 35.2 (R2), LRBC II 1566, SRCV V 20623, Cohen VIII 5, VF, excellent centering, weight 0.926 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 25 Aug 383 - autumn 384 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, BSIS in exergue; rare; $200.00 (178.00)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The reverse legend translates, "Happy Times Restored." Happy times would not last for Constans. This coinage was among his last issues before his general Magnentius rebelled and had him killed.
RL90437. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 244, LRBC II 1136, Voetter 31, SRCV V 18730, Cohen VII 10, Choice gVF, light encrustations, weight 4.945 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 45o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Constans standing left in Galley left, labarum in left hand, Phoenix on globe in right hand, Victory steering at stern, AQS in exergue; $200.00 (178.00)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Judaea Capta, Caesarea Maritima, Samaria

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Judaea Capta issue minted at Caesarea, Judaea. After Herod's death, Caesarea was the seat of the Roman procurator and capital of Roman Palestine for about 500 years. A riot in 66 A.D. between Syrians and Jews in the city led to the First Jewish Revolt. Paul was delivered to Caesarea when his life was threatened in Jerusalem (Acts 9:30). From Caesarea, Paul departed to Tarsus, his birthplace. Paul met the church in Caesarea (Acts 18:22; 21:8,16). Finally, Paul was taken prisoner (Acts 23:23,33) and returned to Caesarea where he was tried before Festus and King Agrippa (Acts 25:1-4; 24:6-13)
JD75361. Bronze AE 26, Hendin 1454, Meshorer TJC 391, RPC II 2304, F, red earthen encrustation, some corrosion, weight 10.803 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima mint, c. 83 A.D.; obverse IMP DOMITIANVS CAES AVG GERMANICVS, laureate head left; reverse Minerva standing right on galley with owl on prow, shield in left, spear downward in right, trophy behind, palm frond right, no legend; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection (a surface find from an agricultural field near Caesarea Paneas in 1972); $200.00 (178.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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It is no wonder this type is rare. Nicomedia belonged to Licinius. In 321, Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging territory in his realm, across the Danube into Licinius' territory. When he repeated this chasing Goths who had pillaged in Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken their treaty. Soon after this issue began, the co-emperors were at war. In 324, this same type was struck for Martinian, who Licinius, after being defeated by Constantine at Adrianople, had appointed as his co-emperor and Constantine's nominal replacement in the west.

The XIIΓ probably indicates that the follis was retariffed to 12 1/2 denarii communes.
RT76372. Billon follis, RIC VII Nicomedia p. 607, 43 (R4); SRCV IV 15950, Cohen VII 292; Hunter V -, VF, excellent centering, cleaning scratches, light corrosion, weight 2.870 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 321 - 324 A.D.; obverse IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing facing, head left, nude but for chlamys over left shoulder, Victory on globe offering wreath in his right hand, eagle topped scepter vertical in left, eagle with wreath in beak standing left on left, XII/Γ on right above bearded captive at feet seated right with head turned looking back at Jupiter, SMNB in exergue; very rare; $200.00 (178.00)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG III

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This legion was probably Caesar's old III Gallica, which fought for Antony. Another possibility is III Cyrenaica, which was perhaps taken over from Lepidus. The III Augusta was probably an Octavian legion.
RR77566. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/15, Sydenham 1217, BMCRR II East 193, RSC I 28, Sear CRI 350, F, weight 3.121 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, fall 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - III, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $200.00 (178.00)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XX

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Antony's XX must have been disbanded by Augustus. The well-known XX Valeria Victrix (which later took part in the conquest of Britain) was probably constituted by Octavian, perhaps after Actium.
RR77568. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/36, Sydenham 1243, BMCRR II East 215, RSC I 57, F, obverse off center, light marks and scratches, weight 3.117 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 135o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XX, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $200.00 (178.00)


Katane, Sicily, c. 461 - 413 B.C., Dies Engraved by Euanotos

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Catania, on the east coast of Sicily facing the Ionian Sea, has had a long and eventful history, having been founded in the 8th century B.C. As observed by Strabo, the location of Catania at the foot of Mount Etna has been both a curse and a blessing. On the one hand, violent outbursts of the volcano throughout history have destroyed large parts of the city, on the other hand the volcanic ashes yield fertile soil, especially suited for the growth of vines. (Strab. vi. p. 269)
GS77854. Silver drachm, Rizzo pl. 14, 7; SNG Mnchen 439; SNG ANS 1263; Franke-Hirmer 38; unsigned dies by the master engraver Euainetos, aF, rough, weight 3.738 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Katane (Catania, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 410 B.C.; obverse Female charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving galloping quadriga to right; above, Nike flying to left crowning charioteer with wreath held in outstretched arms; KATANAIΩN in exergue; reverse AMENANOΣ, youthful head of river-god Amenanos left, diadem in hair, small bull's horn above forehead; fish above shrimp before, second fish behind; very rare; $200.00 (178.00)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

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The star in the field, a symbol of the sun-god, stands for the mint of Rome.
RS79250. Silver denarius, RSC III 194, RIC IV 45, SRCV II 7535, Choice EF, superb portrait, perfect centering and bold strike, sharp detail, a few small edge cracks, some light marks, weight 3.038 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 221 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Victory flying left holding open laurel diadem in both hands, at each side a small shield, star right; $200.00 (178.00)


Aigai, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aegae, Aeolis was located at the mid-point between the modern cities of zmir, Manisa, Bergama and Aliaa.
GB90401. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 12 var. (different monograms); SNGvA 1598 var. (same); SNG Mnchen 368 var. (same); BMC Troas p. 96, 14 (no monograms); SGCV II 4169, gVF, weight 4.601 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aigai mint, 2nd - 1st Centuries B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse AIΓAEΩN, Nike standing left, wreath in righ, palm in left, monogram left, monogram right; $195.00 (173.55)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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On 3 July 324, at Adrianople, Constantine defeated Licinius forcing him to retreat to Byzantium. Crispus destroyed Licinius' fleet at the Battle of Hellespont in the Dardanelles, allowing his father to cross over the Bosporus and besiege Licinius. On 18 September, Constantine I decisively defeated Licinius at the Battle of Chrysopolis and became sole emperor.
RL90682. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII London 281, Cohen VII 28, SRCV IV 16726, Choice EF, green patina, perfect centering, small die break on reverse at 8:00, weight 4.026 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOBIL C, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield; reverse BEAT TRANQLITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLON in exergue; scarce; $195.00 (173.55)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The obverse depicts Trajan as a military victor and probably copies an imperial statue. The reverse may depict a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
GB90707. Bronze AE 20, Lindgren II 978 (same dies), Varbanov 7179 (R7), AMNG III 79, Hunterian I 37, Moushmov 6068, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tb, BMC Macedonia -, F, weight 6.620 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, emperor on horseback galloping right, brandishing spear to strike a prostrate foe below; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; rare; $195.00 (173.55)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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Constantine II was about eight years old when this coin was minted. Here he is draped and cuirassed as a powerful child Caesar with the world in his hands!
SH63721. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 382 (R3) corr. (no cuirass), SRCV IV 17155, Cohen VII 23, gVF, well centered on a tight flan, nice green patina, weight 2.868 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, mappa in left, head of Medusa on cuirass; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR in exergue; rare; $190.00 (169.10)




  



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