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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ MilitaryView Options:  |  |  |   

Military, Combat & Arms on Ancient Coins

Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

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Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered.
GS84619. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 1781.3a, Cohen DCA 118, HGC 9 875a, EF, excellent Hellenistic style, lightly toned, slightly off center, some die wear, light marks, light deposits on obverse, weight 16.950 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch on the Orontes (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 152 - 146 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY ΘEOΠATOPOΣ EYEPΓETOY, Zeus Nikephoros enthroned left, chest bare, himation around hips and legs and over left shoulder, Nike offering him wreath in his right hand, scepter in his left hand, cornucopia (control symbol) outer left, ΓΞP (Seleukid Era year 163) and monogram (control symbol) in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 386 (9 Nov 2016), lot 328; $540.00 (480.60)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VII

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This LEG VII was probably raised by Antony and disbanded by Octavian. It may have been the XV Apollinaris, a legion later was reconstituted by Octavian. The VII Claudia, an old legion of Caesar's, fought for Octavian.
SH85430. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/20, Sydenham 1224, BMCRR II East 198, RSC I 34, Sear CRI 357, VF, attractive coin, toned, two banker's marks in obverse field, some marks and scratches, obverse slightly off center, weight 3.529 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, autumn 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANT?AVG / III VIR?R?P?C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - VII, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex CNG auction 397, lot 450; $490.00 (436.10)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Issued to commemorate victory in Britain. Between 208 and 210 A.D., Septimius Severus and his son Caracalla campaigned into Scotland (then Caledonia) and also restored Hadrian's Wall. The victories in the north pacified the island for the remainder of the century, but the aged Septimius died at Eburacum (York) in 211 A.D.
SH83529. Silver denarius, RIC IV 332 (S); RSC III 727; BMCRE V p. 366, 51; Hunter III 108; SRCV II 6382, Choice gVF, some luster, perfect centering, nice portrait, light toning, small edge cracks, weight 3.369 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 210 - 211 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIAE BRIT (victories over the British), Victory advancing right, raising wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; scarce; $450.00 (400.50)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XI

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This may have been a legion raised by Antony and disbanded by Augustus. The XI Claudia, an old legion of Caesar's, fought for Octavian (and won the title Actiaca at the battle of Actium).
SL79267. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/25, Sydenham 1229, BMCRR II East 203, RSC I 39, NGC F, strike 3/5, surface 2/5, banker's marks (2400602-008), toned, weight 3.48 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; NGC certified (slabbed); $400.00 (356.00)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG V

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This may have been the famous V Alaudae ('the larks'), a Caesarean legion which remained loyal to Antony but was later retained by Augustus. There are other possibilities, however: V Macedonica, a Caesarean legion about which little is known; V Urbana, disbanded after Actium (and therefore quite likely an Antonian legion); and V Gallica, a Caesarean legion that was probably the one that under Lollius lost its eagle to German raiders in Gaul in 17 B.C.
RS79795. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/18, Sydenham 1221, BMCRR II East 196, RSC I 32, Sear CRI 354, SRCV I 1479, VF, obverse slightly off-center, banker's mark on obverse, weight 3.714 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT AVG III. VIR. R. P. C., galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - V, legionary aquila between two standards; $280.00 (249.20)


Parthian Empire, Vonones I, c. 8 - 12 A.D.

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The reverse legend commemorates Vonones' temporary victory over Artabanos, the king who would in time defeat him. Unlike most Parthian coins, the reverse type is not the usual seated archer and the king's personal name appears in the Greek legend.
GS85455. Silver drachm, Sellwood 60.5, Sunrise 407, Shore 329, SNG Cop 146 - 147, gVF, light toning, reverse slightly off center on a broad flan, weight 4.052 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Ecbatana (Hamedan, Iran) mint, c. 8 - 12 A.D.; obverse BACIΛEYC ONWNHC, diademed head left, medium tapering square cut beard, ear visible, wearing earring, diadem with four bands, loop behind, three diadem ends, torque without visible end; reverse BACIΛEYC ONWNHC NEIKHCAC APTABANON (King Vonones, conqueror of Artabanos, squared legend around), Nike standing right, extending palm frond in right hand, wreath in left hand, Ekbatana mint TA dot monogram below palm; from the Robert L3 Collection, ex CNG e-auction 155 (3 Jan 2007), lot 118; $255.00 (226.95)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RA76334. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 904 (S); Cohen VI 69; Pink VI-1, p. 43; Hunter IV 311 var. (1st officina); cf. SRCV III 11195 (Rome mint, etc.), gVF, green patina with some silvering remaining, weight 4.393 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, 2nd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 2nd emission, end 276 - beginning 277 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), radiate, helmeted, and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over right shoulder, oval shield decorated with charging horseman on left arm; reverse ADVENTVS PROBI AVG (the arrival of Emperor Probus), Probus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left hand, horses' right foreleg raised over bound captive seated left, B in exergue; scarce; $250.00 (222.50)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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This type is apparently unpublished and this is the only example of the type known to Forum. This reverse was used for very rare (both R5) issues of Licinius I and Licinius II Caesar. CNG e-auction 368, lot 496, is Constantine II with this same reverse, also 5th officina, but with Constantine II on the obverse left holding a Victory on globe and mappa.
RL76392. Billon centenionalis, apparently unpublished, cf. RIC VII Siscia 116 - 117 (for obv. type) and 138 - 139 (for rev. type, issues of the Licinii), EF, excellent portrait, both sides slightly off-center, left side of reverse legend weak, some porosity, a few light marks, weight 2.773 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, as caesar, 320 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left; reverse VIRTVS EXERCIT (courage of the army), vexillum inscribed VOT / XX in two lines, two seated barbarian captives back-to-back flanking base, Christogram (Chi-Rho monogram) left, ESIS star in exergue; ex Scott Collection; extremely rare; $240.00 (213.60)


Lokris Opuntia, Lokris, Greece, c. 340 - 330 B.C.

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Lokrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. Locrians are mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as following Ajax, the son of Oleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships, and as inhabiting the towns of Kynos, Opus, Calliarus, Besa, Scarphe, Augeiae, Tarphe, and Thronium. Lokrian Ajax was called the "lesser" or "Lokrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
GS83462. Silver triobol, BCD Lokris 98; BMC Central p. 2, 9; SNG Cop 50; SNG Lockett 1700; de Luynes 1958; Pozzi 1339; SGCV I 2330; HGC 4 997, aVF, attractive style, tight flan, etched surfaces, weight 2.385 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lokris Opuntia mint, c. 340 - 330 B.C.; obverse head of Persephone right, wearing wreath of grain, single-pendant earring, and pearl necklace; reverse OΠONTIΩN, Ajax son of Oileus, advancing right in fighting attitude, nude but for crested Corinthian helmet, short sword in right hand, shield on left arm ornamented inside with coiled snake (control symbol), kantharos (control symbol) below; scarce; $240.00 (213.60)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 278, Probus defeated the Alamanni, expelled the Franks from Gaul, reorganized the defenses on the Rhine, resettled the Germanic tribes in the devastated provinces of the Roman Empire, and adopted the titles of Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus.
RA76279. Silvered antoninianus, Pink VI-1, p. 63; RIC, part 2, V 376 (S) var. (cuirass); Cohen VI 283 var. (same); Hunter IV 131 var. (same, and obv legend); SRCV III 11984 (same), Choice aEF, some mint luster, most silvering remains, fantastic heroic bust, light corrosion, weight 3.341 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 4 emission, 278 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), radiate bust left from behind, spear left in right hand, back bare but for balteus over right shoulder and rectangular Aegis shield with square corner in on left shoulder; reverse HERCVLI PACIF (to Hercules the pacifier), Hercules standing left, raising branch in extended right, club and Nemean Lion skin in left, VXXT in exergue; very rare; $235.00 (209.15)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XII

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This old Caesarean legion was known at different times as Victrix, Antiquae, Paterna and finally XII Fulminata ('the thunderers'). Its veterans settled (among other places) in Patras in Greece. After fighting without great distinction in the First Jewish Revolt, the legion was transferred to Melitene in Cappadocia, where it remained for several hundred years.
RR85202. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/26, Sydenham 1230, BMCRR II East 204, RSC I 41, Sear CRI 365, F, toned, off center, scratches, weight 3.216 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 225o, Patrae(?) mint, autumn 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XII, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $220.00 (195.80)


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

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Sulla in a dream first saw Venus with the weapons of Mars as Venus Victrix and made her his personal patroness. In the night before the battle of Pharsalus 48 B.C. Pompey dreamed of Venus Victrix - seemingly a lucky sign. Caesar sacrificed to Venus Genetrix, but issued as watchword 'Venus Victrix', and defeated Pompey!
RS85213. Silver denarius, RIC III 786, RSC II 89, BMCRE IV 353, Hunter II 18, SRCV II 5492, Choice EF, well centered and struck, edge cracks, weight 3.282 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse VENVS VICTRIX (victorious Venus), Venus standing half left, right breast bare, Victory in right hand, left hand on grounded shield; $220.00 (195.80)


Pharsalos, Thessaly, Greece, 3rd Century B.C.

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Pharsalos, built on a hillside of the Narthacius Mountains, was one of the main cities in Thessaly. In the Persian Wars, Pharsalos sided with the Athenians. In the early 4th century B.C., the city was a part of the Thessalian League. Later, it joined the Macedonian Kingdom under Philip II. The area became a theater of war where the Aetolians and the Thessalians clashed with the Macedonians, especially during the Second and the Third Macedonian Wars. After the defeat of the Macedonian Kingdom, Pharsalos and the whole area became a part of the Roman Republic. Pharsalos is famous for being the scene of the final battle between Caesar and Pompey.
GB73546. Bronze tetrachalkon, Lavva 326 (V170/R234), cf. BCD Thessaly 1299, BCD Thessaly II 674.6, HGC 4 649 (S), Rogers 505 (none with full reverse inscription), gF, green patina, strike a little weak in centers, weight 7.518 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pharsalos (Farsala, Greece) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse head of Athena Parthenos turned slightly to the left, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet, shield over her left shoulder, spear over her right shoulder; dot within Π left, dot border; reverse armored Thessalian horseman riding right, wielding flail overhead in right hand, reins in left hand; on far side at rear of horse, attendant walking right with spare flail in right hand over right shoulder, ΦAP-[ΣA?] above left, AΛN (sic) below; scarce; $200.00 (178.00)


Termessos Major, Pisidia, 3rd Century A.D.

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Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36-25 BC). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
GB83542. Bronze AE 38, SNGvA 5364; BMC Lycia p. 273, 41; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNG PfPs -; SNG Righetti -; SNG Tub -, aVF, green patina, rough, pitting, corrosion, smoothing, edge chip, centration dimples, weight 28.152 g, maximum diameter 37.8 mm, die axis 0o, Termessos Major mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 238 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMHCCEΩN AVTONOMΩN, laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse TΩN MEIZONΩN, Athena standing slightly left, head left, wearing helmet, long chiton, and peplos, holding Nike offering wreath in right hand, spear in left hand, shield at feet on far side of right leg, trophy of captured arms behind, Θ left; about twice the weight of the similar smaller and less rare coin with the same types (SNG BnF 2189, AE33, 14.06g); very rare; $200.00 (178.00)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

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In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL90446. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 286 (S), LRBC II 1173, Voetter 51, SRCV V 18203, VF, well centered, slightly rough green patina, coppery high-points, weight 4.749 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star before; reverse HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, Constantius standing facing head left, holding labarum (Chi Rho Christogram standard) and spear, Victory right crowning him, A left, ASIS in exergue (A's often appear as H in this period); scarce; $190.00 (169.10)


Carinus, First Half 283 - Spring 285 A.D.

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When this coin was struck in 282, Carinus was still the Prince of Youth, full of promise. Later he would be remembered as one of the worst Roman emperors. This infamy is, however, likely part fiction, supported by Diocletian himself. For example, the (unreliable) Historia Augusta has Carinus marrying nine wives, while neglecting to mention his only real wife, Magnia Urbica, by whom he had a son, Nigrinianus. After his death, Carinus' memory was officially condemned in the Roman proceeding known as Damnatio Memoriae. His name, along with that of his wife, was erased from inscriptions.
RS71588. Billon antoninianus, Venra IV 390 (LV 4227); RIC V, part 2, 182; Cohen VI 97; Hunter III 71; Pink VI-2, p. 28; SRCV III 12302, Choice EF, most silvering remains, well centered and struck, nice portrait, some porosity, weight 4.627 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 2nd issue as caesar, 282 - 283 A.D.; obverse M AVR CARINVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVT (to the Prince of Youth), Carinus standing left, globe in extended right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, bound captive seated left at feet on left, QXXI in exergue; $180.00 (160.20)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 85 - 65 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB76954. Bronze AE 20, BMC Pontus p. 20, 72; SNG BM 1187 var. (different monogram right); SNG Stancomb 688 ff. var. (different monograms); SNG Cop 167 ff. var. (same), VF, well centered on usual tight flan, nice green patina, minor flan adjustment marks, weight 8.426 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse aegis with facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) in center; reverse AMI−ΣOY, Nike advancing right, holding palm frond across shoulders behind, A∆T monogram lower left, AMTE monogram lower right; $180.00 (160.20)


Himera, Sicily, c. 470 - 450 B.C.

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In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were put to death by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C.
GS84998. Silver obol, SNG Cop 312; SNG Munchen 355; SNG Lloyd 1028; BMC Sicily p. 81, 47; HGC 2 447 (R1); SNG ANS -; Klein -; Winterthur I -, F/VF, well centered and struck, etched surfaces, weight 0.650 g, maximum diameter 10.6 mm, die axis 270o, Himera (Termini, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 470 - 450 B.C.; obverse bearded male (Kronos?) head right, wearing tainia (hair band); reverse HIMEPA (clockwise starting below, retrograde), Corinthian helmet right, no crest, within shallow incuse; rare; $180.00 (160.20)


Termessos Major, Pisidia, 3rd Century A.D.

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Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36-25 BC). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
RP85008. Bronze AE 34, SNG BnF 2189 var. (Θ rev. center); SNGvA 5362 var. (same); BMC Lycia p. 273, 41 var. (Θ rev. l.); SNG Cop -; SNG PfPs -; SNG Tub -, aVF, well centered, some legend weak, light corrosion, weight 18.257 g, maximum diameter 33.9 mm, die axis 0o, Termessos Major mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 238 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMHCCEΩN AVTONOMΩN, laureate and bearded head of Zeus right, Θ below; reverse TΩN MEIZONΩN, Athena standing slightly left, head left, wearing helmet, long chiton, and peplos, holding Nike offering wreath in right hand, spear in left hand, shield at feet on far side of right leg, trophy of captured arms behind; big 34 mm bronze; rare; $170.00 (151.30)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

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The Battle of Antioch. After Macrinus foolishly cut legionary pay, Legio III Gallica hailed Elagabalus as emperor on 16 May 218. Macrinus sent cavalry but they too joined Elagabalus. Macrinus finally abandoned his pay cut and paid a bonus, but it was too late. Legion II Parthica defected. General Gannys, the commander of Elagabalus' forces, decisively defeated Macrinus was just outside Antioch on 8 June 218. Macrinus shaved off his hair and beard and fled, disguised as a member of the military police. He was recognized by a centurion at Chalcedon on the Bosporus, taken back to Antioch and executed.
RS84623. Silver denarius, RIC IV 187, BMCRE V 275, RSC III 15, Hunter III 111, SRCV II 7505, VF, lustrous fields, excellent portrait, toned, tight flan, weight 2.093 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 16 May 218 - 219 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse CONCORDIA MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), two military standards between two legionary eagles; ex Numismatik Naumman (Vienna), auction 47, part of lot 873; scarce; $165.00 (146.85)


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

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Aelia Flaccilla was a fervent supporter of the Nicene Creed. Sozomen reports her preventing a conference between Theodosius and Eunomius of Cyzicus who served as figurehead of Anomoeanism, a sect of Arians. Ambrose and Gregory of Nyssa praise her Christian virtue and comment on her role as "a leader of justice" and "pillar of the Church." She is commemorated as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church; her feast day is 14 September.
RL70543. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 35.2 (R2), LRBC II 1566, SRCV V 20623, Cohen VIII 5, VF, excellent centering, weight 0.926 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 25 Aug 383 - autumn 384 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, BSIS in exergue; rare; $160.00 (142.40)


Valens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D.

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Valens was the younger brother of Valentinian I, and he was declared Augustus in 364 A.D. He was given command of the Eastern provinces, where he spent much of his time campaigning against the Goths and Persians. In 376 A.D., Valens allowed Gothic tribes, who were being driven forward by the Huns to settle in the Danube provinces. The Goths were so badly treated by the Romans that they rebelled. Valens was defeated by the Goths at the catastrophic battle of Hadrianople, where he lost his life and two-thirds of the Roman army was killed.
RS84407. Silver siliqua, RIC IX Trier 27(e)1, RSC V 109a, Hunter V 7, SRCV V 19675, VF, well centered, toned, flan cracks, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 1.963 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 28 Mar 364 - 24 Aug 367 A.D.; obverse D N VALEN-S P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse VRBS ROMA (City of Rome), Roma seated left on throne, Victory on globe in Roma's right hand, scepter or spear without point vertical in her left hand, Victory extends wreath in right hand and holds palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, TRPS in exergue; scarce; $160.00 (142.40)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RP84963. Bronze AE 27, RPC IV 8302, Touratsoglou 38 ff., Varbanov 4338 (R5) var. (crescent and star right), SNG Hunterian -, BMC Macedonia -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, VF, nice portrait, die wear, slight corrosion, tiny edge cracks, weight 12.628 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 184 - 188 A.D.; obverse AVTOK M AVP KOMM ANTΩNEINON (clockwise from upper right), laureate head right; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN (clockwise from upper right), Nike advancing right, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, crescent right; rare; $160.00 (142.40)


Aigai, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aegae, Aeolis was located at the mid-point between the modern cities of zmir, Manisa, Bergama and Aliaa.
GB90401. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 12 var. (different monograms); SNGvA 1598 var. (same); SNG Munchen 368 var. (same); BMC Troas p. 96, 14 (no monograms); SGCV II 4169, gVF, weight 4.601 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aigai mint, 2nd - 1st Centuries B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse AIΓAEΩN, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, palm in left, monogram left, monogram right; $155.00 (137.95)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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Constantine II was about eight years old when this coin was minted. Here he is draped and cuirassed as a powerful child Caesar with the world in his hands!
SH63721. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 382 (R3) corr. (no cuirass), SRCV V 17155, Cohen VII 23, gVF, well centered on a tight flan, nice green patina, weight 2.868 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, mappa in left, head of Medusa on cuirass; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR in exergue; rare; $150.00 (133.50)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D., EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, Q, SXXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click EQVITI to read the NumisWiki article, Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark. The letter Q in the reverse field is the second letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter S in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the second officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA77126. Billon antoninianus, Cohen VI 488 (also with helmet); RIC V, part 2, 492 (R); Pink VI-1, p. 67/9; Hunter IV -, SRCV III -, Choice gVF, well centered and struck, much silvering, unusual obverse legend, weight 3.366 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, emission 9, 281 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI INVICTI AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over right shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse PROVIDENT AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left holding globe in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, Q in left field, SXXI in exergue; rare; $150.00 (133.50)


Termessos Major, Pisidia, Late 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

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Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36-25 BC). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
RP84971. Bronze AE 30, SNG BnF 2188 var. (same obv. die, no rev. Θ), SNG Cop 330; SNGvA 5355 var. (no Θ's); BMC Lycia p. 274, 51 var. (same), VF, uneven strike with weak areas, bumps and marks, corrosion, weight 12.799 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 180o, Termessos Major mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMH-CCEΩN, laureate and bearded bust of Zeus right, Θ below; reverse TΩN MEI-ZO-NΩN, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left, Nike flying left behind her, crowning Tyche with wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, Θ low center; rare; $150.00 (133.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RT85189. Billon follis, RIC VII Siscia 15 (R2), SRCV IV15940, Cohen VII 289 corr. (rev. misdescribed), Hunter V 244 var. (1st officina),, Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, sharp detail, attractive style, nice green patina, areas of slightest porosity, weight 3.569 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 315 - 316 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CON-SERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for paludamentum on left shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand presenting wreath, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle at feet on left facing left with head turned back right and wreath in beak, Γ right, SIS in exergue; scarce; $150.00 (133.50)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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Did you read the description and wonder, what is a vexillum and what is a staurogram? If so, note the terms are in blue text. Click on any blue text in our website catalog to open a page or website where you will find a definition, explanation or related information. This type was issued with various Christian symbols on the banner.
RL85552. Billon light maiorina, RIC VIII Antioch 127 (S), LRBC II 2616, Voetter 22, SRCV V 18234, Cohen VII 41, Choice VF, well centered bold full-circles strike, weight 3.909 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), emperor standing left, vexillum with staurogram on flag in right, resting left on grounded shield behind, two kneeling bound captives at feet before him, star left, ANB in exergue; scarce; $150.00 (133.50)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RA76277. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 166 (S); Cohen VI 69; Hunter IV 6; Pink VI-1, pp. 55; SRCV III 11953 var. (obv leg), aEF, magnificent armed bust, most silvering remaining, perfect centering, some corrosion, weight 4.183 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, emission 2, 277 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), radiate, helmeted, and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over right shoulder, oval shield on left shoulder; reverse ADVENTVS PROBI AVG (the arrival of Emperor Probus), Probus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left hand, horses' right foreleg raised over bound captive seated left, R in exergue; scarce; $145.00 (129.05)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RB79951. Bronze AE 29, Touratsoglou p. 186, 7 (V5/R9); RPC Online III 618; Varbanov III 4295 (R4); SNG ANS 849 var. (no crescent), SNG Cop 412 var. (same); BMC Macedonia -, F, excellent portrait, dark green patina, flan adjustment marks, centration dimples, weight 16.494 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, emission 1, phase 1, 25 Jan 98 - 103 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, laureate head right; reverse ΘECAΛΛONIKEWN, Victory flying right, raising wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left hand, small crescent with horns up in right field; $145.00 (129.05)


Himera, Sicily, c. 472-413 B.C.

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In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were put to death by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C.
GA76588. Silver obol, cf. SNG Cop 312; SNG Munchen 355; SNG Lloyd 1027; BMC Sicily p. 81, 47; SNG ANS -; Klein -, VF, obverse off-center, reverse legend weak, uneven toning, a little rough, weight 0.586 g, maximum diameter 10.6 mm, Himera (Termini, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 472-413 B.C.; obverse bearded male (Kronos?) head right, wearing fillet (hair band); reverse HIMEPA (or similar), Corinthian helmet right, no crest, within shallow incuse; rare; $140.00 (124.60)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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The reverse legend abbreviates, Victoriae Laetae Principium Perpertua, which translates, "Joyous victory to the eternal Prince." VOT P R on the shield abbreviates, Vota Populi Romani, which translates, "Vows (prayers) of the Roman people."
RL77186. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 209 (R1), SRCV IV 16297, Cohen VII 640, Hunter V -, Choice EF, much silvering, some luster, areas of mild porosity, weight 3.096 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 318 - 319 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laureate, helmeted and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP (joyous eternal victories of the prince), two Victories holding shield inscribed VOT / P R over altar, STR in exergue; $140.00 (124.60)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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In 331 A.D., Constantine I vigorously promoted Christianity, confiscating the property and valuables of a number of pagan temples throughout the Empire.
RL79178. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 527, LRBC I 56, SRCV V 17313, Cohen VIII 122, Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, nice dark green patina, slight die wear, areas of light porosity, weight 2.245 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 195o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, as caesar, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRS in exergue; $140.00 (124.60)


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP84961. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1651, Varbanov III 3229, SGICV 32, SNG Cop 305, AMNG III 14, BMC Macedonia 23, VF, dark patina, some light corrosion, weight 5.683 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder, VIC - AVG divided across field; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; $140.00 (124.60)


Termessos Major, Pisidia, Late 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

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Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36-25 BC). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
RP84974. Bronze AE 28, cf. SNG BnF 2188; SNG Cop 332; SNGvA 5355; SNG Righetti 1445; BMC Lycia p. 274, 51; McClean 9036, VF, centered on a tight flan, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 15.217 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 180o, Termessos Major mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMHC-CEΩN, laureate and bearded bust of Zeus right; reverse TΩN M-EI-ZONΩN, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left, Nike flying left behind her, crowning Tyche with wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; rare; $140.00 (124.60)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA85002. Billon antoninianus, RIC V 435 corr. (also cuirassed), Hunter IV 112 corr. (same), Cohen VI 819, Pink VI/1 p. 61, Choice VF, nice portrait, much silvering on reverse, some light corrosion, weight 3.724 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 278 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Virtus standing facing, helmeted head left, Victory in right hand, resting left hand on grounded spear and shield, QXXT in exergue; $140.00 (124.60)


Termessos Major, Pisidia, Late 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

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Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36-25 BC). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
RP85004. Bronze AE 28, BMC Lycia p. 274, 51 var. (leg. also ends in ex.); McClean 9036; SNGvA 5355; SNG Cop 332; SNG Righetti 1445; SNG BnF 2188 var. (Θ below bust), F, centered on a tight flan, light marks, light corrosion, weight 16.613 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 180o, Termessos Major mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEP-MHCCEΩ-N, laureate and bearded bust of Zeus right; reverse TΩ-N M-EIZO-NΩN, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left, Nike flying left behind her, crowning Tyche with wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; rare; $140.00 (124.60)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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This coin is a small module quadrans struck on orichalcum (brass). The same type was also struck on a normal size copper quadrans flan.
RB85334. Orichalcum quadrans (small module), BMCRE I 291 (also small module), Cohen I 180, RIC I 317, SRCV I 1987 var. (CLAVD), BnF I -, gVF, green patina, scratches, small patina chip and rough spot on obverse, weight 1.568 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 65 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAV CAE AVG GER, crested Corinthian helmet right on top of cippus, oval shield leaning on the column to right, spear diagonal pointing upper right on far side of column leaning on shield; reverse P M TR P - IMP P P, upright branch, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across lower half of field; rare; $140.00 (124.60)


Tisna, Aeolis, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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GB68074. Bronze AE 10, Trait II 2074, pl. CLVII, 22; Klein 345 var. (head right); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, SNG Munchen -, BMC Troas -, Lindgren -, VF, weight 1.214 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 225o, Tisna mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse youthful head of river-god Tisnaios left; reverse sword in scabbard with strap, TIΣNA/ON (in two lines, one above, one below); very rare; $135.00 (120.15)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The obverse depicts Trajan as a military victor and probably copies an imperial statue. The reverse may depict a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
GB90707. Bronze AE 20, Lindgren II 978 (same dies), Varbanov 7179 (R7), AMNG III 79, Hunterian I 37, Moushmov 6068, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tub -, BMC Macedonia -, F, weight 6.620 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, emperor on horseback galloping right, brandishing spear to strike a prostrate foe below; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; rare; $135.00 (120.15)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

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In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL73908. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 286 (S), LRBC II 1173, Voetter 51, SRCV V 18203, VF, well centered and struck, nice green patina, spots of corrosion on the obverse, small edge cracks, weight 4.277 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star before; reverse HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, Constantius standing facing head left, holding labarum (Chi Rho Christogram standard) and spear, Victory right crowning him, A left, ΓSIS in exergue; scarce; $135.00 (120.15)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

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A temple of Mn has been excavated at Antioch, Pisidia. Luna, the Greek moon goddess, was female, which seems natural because the female menstrual cycle follows the lunar month. But Mn was a male moon-god, probably originally of the indigenous non-Greek Karian people. By Roman times, Mn was worshiped across Anatolia and in Attica. He was associated with fertility, healing, and punishment. Mn is usually depicted with a crescent moon behind his shoulders, wearing a Phrygian cap, and holding a lance or sword in one hand and a pine-cone or patera in the other. His other attributes include the bucranium and cock.
RP79565. Bronze AE 24, Krzyzanowska -, BMC Lycia -, SNG BnF -, SNG PfPs -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Righetti -, SNG Hunterian -, Lindgren -, VF, attractive unusual bust with aegis, dark patina with coppery high points, weight 5.635 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis; reverse ANTIOCH FORTVNA COE, Mn standing facing, head right, wearing Phrygian cap, crescent with horns up rising behind shoulders, left foot on bucranium, leaning with left elbow on cippus, long scepter vertical in right hand, Nike in left hand, cock standing left at feet on left; $135.00 (120.15)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS79983. Silver denarius, RIC IV 23; RSC III 206; BMCRE V p. 200, 247; Hunter III 14; SRCV II 7205, EF, cute boy portrait, well struck, toned, surfaces a little frosty, light marks, edge cracks, weight 3.482 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, c. 200 - 202 A.D.; obverse P SEPT GETA CAES PONT, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VICT AETERN, Victory flying left, holding open wreath in both hands over shield set on low base; ex Forum (2006) ex CNG electronic auction 121 (Sep 2005), lot 242; $135.00 (120.15)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RP79950. Bronze AE 27, Touratsoglou p. 246, 5 (V6/-, unlisted rev. die); SNG Cop 422; Varbanov III 4471 (R3); BMC Macedonia p. 123, 109; SNG ANS 873 var. (bust from behind), VF, well centered and struck, nice green patina, small edge split, flan crack, light marks, weight 11.341 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AV K M AV CEV AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, Kabeiros in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; scarce; $135.00 (120.15)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 280 - 281, Probus put down three usurpers, Julius Saturninus, Proculus and Bonosus. The extent of these revolts is not clear, but there are clues that they were not just local problems (an inscription with the name of Probus erased has been found as far as Spain). In 281, the emperor was in Rome, where he celebrated his triumph.
RA79969. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 223; Cohen VI 766; Pink VI-1, pp. 57-58/6; Hunter IV -; SRCV III -, Choice EF, perfect centering, bold obverse, excellent portrait, much silvering, reverse die wear, weight 4.205 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Rome mint, emission 6, 281 A.D.; obverse PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA GERM (victory over the Germans), trophy of captured arms, flanked on each side at the base by a seated bound captive facing outward, R thunderbolt A in exergue; $135.00 (120.15)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RP83478. Bronze AE 24, Touratsoglou 158 (V25/R55), McClean 3793, Varbanov 4416 (R6), Moushmov 6753, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, BMC Macedonia -, F, green patina, a few minor scratches, edge bump, weight 6.654 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 90o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, obverse AV K M AVP ANTΩNINOC, laureate head right; reverse ΘECCAΛONKEΩN, Nike standing right, left foot on helmet, shield held with both hands and resting on left knee; $135.00 (120.15)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP83493. Bronze AE 26, Touratsoglou p. 262, 25 (V2/R20), Varbanov III 4545 (R3), SNG Hunterian 714, SNG Cop 426, SNG Evelpidis 1348, BMC Macedonia p. 124, 116, aVF, excellent portrait, green patina, large centration dimple on obverse, bumps and marks, some light corrosion, weight 9.207 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AV K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, Kabeiros holding hammer in her right hand, palm frond in her left hand; $135.00 (120.15)


Roman Republic, L. Flaminius Chilo, 109 - 108 B.C.

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Spartacus, the Roman slave and rebel leader was born in 109 B.C. He died in 71 B.C.
RR85331. Silver denarius, Crawford 302/1, Sydenham 540, BMCRR Rome 537, RSC I Flaminia 1, RBW Collection 1144, SRCV I 179, VF, toned, bumps marks, weight 3.858 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 109 - 108 B.C.; obverse ROMA, helmeted head of Roma right, X (mark of value) below chin; reverse Victory in biga right, wreath in right hand, reigns in left hand, L FLAMINI below, CILO in exergue; $135.00 (120.15)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was home to an imperial cult, worshiping the living emperor, and to a cult dedicated to Artemis Tauropolos. The obverse depicts Trajan as a military victor and probably copies an imperial statue. The reverse may depict a local statue of Artemis Tauropolos.
GB90406. Bronze AE 20, Lindgren II 978 (same dies), Varbanov 7179 (R7), AMNG III 79, Hunterian I 37, Moushmov 6068, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tub -, BMC Macedonia -, gF, centered, some porosity, weight 5.099 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 25 Jan 98 - 8/9 Aug 117 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, emperor on horseback galloping right, brandishing spear to strike a prostrate foe below; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Artemis Tauropolos standing left, kalathos on head, long torch before her in right hand, small branch in left hand downward at side, grounded shield behind; rare; $130.00 (115.70)




  



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Catalog current as of Thursday, September 21, 2017.
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Military