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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Olympians ▸ Ares or MarsView Options:  |  |  | 

Ares or Mars

God of war and bloodshed. Symbols include the boar and the spear. Son of Zeus and Hera.


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.; EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, I, QXXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click "EQVITI" to read the NumisWiki article, "Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark." The letter "I" in the reverse field is the fourth letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter "Q" in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the fourth officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA62615. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 509, EF, weight 3.910 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 281 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left; reverse MARTI PACIF (to Mars the peacemaker), Mars advancing left, holding olive-branch, shield and spear, I left, QXXI in exergue; sharp strike with full silvering, some hoard patina remaining; $85.00 (72.25)


Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 100 - 85 B.C.

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We have been unable to find another example with this flower(?) or palm(?) control symbol on the reverse.
GB63160. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 311 var., BMC Pontus p. 100, 49 var.; SNG BM 1528 ff. var.; SNG Stancomb 795 var.; SNGvA 227 var. (no refs. with this symbol left), VF, weight 8.575 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, 100 - 85 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Ares right; reverse ΣINΩ−ΠHΣ, sword in scabbard, flower(?) or palm(?) lower left; rare, unpublished(?); $85.00 (72.25)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 278 A.D., Probus defeated the Alamanni, expelled the Franks from Gaul, reorganized the Roman defenses on the Rhine and resettled the Germanic tribes in the devastated provinces. He adopted the titles Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus.
RA47015. Silvered antoninianus, Alfldi Siscia V type 96, n 79; RIC V, part 2, 811 var. (bust type), Choice EF, weight 3.844 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 278 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), Mars walking right, nude but for cloak flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, XXIS in exergue; full silvering and centering, slightly flat reverse; $80.00 (68.00)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

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The Battle of Antioch. After Macrinus unwisely cut legionary pay, Legio III Gallica hailed Elagabalus as emperor on 16 May 218. Macrinus sent cavalry but they too joined Elagabalus. He finally abandoned his pay cut and paid a bonus, but it was too late. Legion II Parthica defected. General Gannys, the commander of Elagabalus' forces, decisively defeated Macrinus was just outside Antioch on 8 June 218. Macrinus shaved off his hair and beard and fled, disguised as a member of the military police. He was recognized by a centurion at Chalcedon on the Bosporus, taken back to Antioch and executed.
RS73663. Silver denarius, RSC III 113a; BMCRE V p. 533, 21; RIC IV 123c (S); SRCV II 7523; Hunter III 11 var. (no cuirass), VF, well centered on a tight flan, toned frosty surfaces, weight 2.579 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 218 - 219 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse MARS VICTOR (Mars the Victor), Mars advancing right, helmeted, nude but for cloak flying behind at waist, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of captured arms over shoulder in left hand; $80.00 (68.00)


Syracuse, Sicily, Roman Rule, c. 130 - 70 B.C.

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GI85339. Bronze AE 22, Calciati p. 431, 233; SNG Cop 910; SNG ANS 1087; HGC 2 1475 (R1), aF, uneven green patina, weight 5.350 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, c. 130 - 70 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Ares right; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, Nike standing facing, wings spread, preparing to sacrifice bull prostate below; rare; $70.00 (59.50)


Quintillus, August or September - October or November 270 A.D.

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"Mars the Pacifier" may be seen as ironic today, but the Romans knew that victory in war (hopefully including the total destruction of your enemy) is an effective way to achieve peace.
RL74565. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1190, RIC V 24, Normanby 1194, Cunetio 2351, SRCV III 11448, aF, weight 1.936 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, 10th officina, Rome mint, 1st issue, end 270; obverse IMP C M AVR CL QVINTILLVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse MARTI PACI (to Mars the peacemaker), Mars standing left, wearing military garb, olive branch raised in right hand, spear and shield in left hand, X in exergue; $60.00 (51.00)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS64642. Silver antoninianus, RIC V 57, RSC 273a, Schulzki AGK 64, Elmer 332, Cunetio 2406, Hunter IV 4, SRCV III 10974, VF, excellent centering, toned, nice style, slight porosity, edge cracks, weight 3.442 g, maximum diameter 21.618 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 263 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Mars walking right, helmeted, nude but for cloak tied at waist and flying behind, spear transverse in right hand, trophy over left shoulder in left hand; $50.00 (42.50)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS64657. Silver antoninianus, RIC V 57, RSC 273a, Schulzki AGK 64, Elmer 332, Cunetio 2406, Hunter IV 4, SRCV III 10974, VF, well centered, toned, edge cracks, weight 2.512 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 45o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 263 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Mars walking right, helmeted, nude but for cloak tied at waist and flying behind, spear transverse in right hand, trophy over left shoulder in left hand; $45.00 (38.25)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS73366. Silver denarius, RSC III 76, RIC IV 103, BMCRE V 742, SRCV II 7179, VF, small flan, weight 1.830 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 202 A.D.; obverse P SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES, draped bust right, from behind; reverse MARTI VICTORI, Mars advancing right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left; scarce; $45.00 (38.25)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RB64658. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 419; RIC V, part 2, 93; Mairat 56; Schulzki AGK 102; Elmer 190; Cunetio 2400; SRCV III -, VF, well centered and struck, flan cracks, weight 3.351 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 45o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 262 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Mars standing right, helmeted, nude but for paludamentum on shoulders, vertical spear in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield at side; $38.00 (32.30)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RS76509. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 93; RSC IV 419a; Mairat 56; Schulzki AGK 102; Elmer 190; Cunetio 2400; SRCV III -, VF, white metal, nice portrait, struck with a worn reverse die, porous, ragged flan with edge cracks, weight 3.036 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 45o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 262 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Mars standing right, helmeted, nude but for paludamentum on shoulders, vertical spear in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield at side; $38.00 (32.30)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 277 Probus began his campaign in Gaul, clearing the Goths and Germanic tribes from the province.
RA46831. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 816, Choice VF, weight 4.683 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 277 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle-tipped scepter in right; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), Mars walking right, nude but for helmet and cloak flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, P lower right, XXI in exergue; extensive silvering, full circles centering, nicer than photo suggest; $36.00 (30.60)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 100 - 85 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB72621. Brass AE 19, SNG BM 1148; SNG Stancomb 676; SNG Cop 148; SNGvA 64; BMC Pontus p. 17, 40; SGCV II 3643; HGC 7 241, aVF, weight 7.414 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 85 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Ares right; reverse AMI−ΣOY, sword in sheath with strap; $36.00 (30.60)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Gallienus paid particular adoration to Mars. He raised a temple to the worship of Mars in the Circus Flaminius and called the god Propugnator (champion or defender). "Mars the Pacifier or Peacemaker" may be seen as ironic today, but the Romans knew that victory in war (hopefully including the total destruction of your enemy) is an effective way to achieve peace.
RA84388. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 68 (also with A appearing like N), Gbl MIR 570a, RIC V S236, RSC IV 617a, SRCV III 10288, VF, well centered, dark patina, weak centers, slightest porosity, weight 3.497 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 8th emission, c. 263 - 266 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right, one tie over shoulder; reverse MARTI PACIFERO (to Mars the peacemaker), Mars standing left in military garb, raising olive branch in right hand, left resting on grounded shield behind, spear vertical behind with point up resting against shield and left arm, A (top open, appearing like N) left; $34.00 (28.90)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Siscia, a chief town and colony of Pannonia, was located at the confluence of the Colapis and the Savus, and is now called Sisak, Croatia. The Roman imperial mint operated from 260 to c. 390 A.D. The mint master was called procurator monetae Siscianae.
RA46821. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 810; Alfldi, Siscia V 96, 178; Pink VI-1, p. 50; Hunter IV 12071; SRCV III 12071; Cohen VI 900, gVF, full circles strike, extensive silvering, weight 3.778 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 4th emission, 277 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle-tipped scepter in right; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), Mars walking right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, XXIS in exergue; $32.00 (27.20)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 100 - 85 B.C.

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The grooves in this coin are not scratches made in circulation. They are "adjustment marks" made at the mint during manufacture of the flan, prior to striking.
GB56855. Bronze AE 20, SNG BM 1148; SNG Stancomb 676; SNG Cop 148; SNGvA 64; BMC Pontus p. 17, 40; SGCV II 3643; HGC 7 241, aVF, flan adjustment marks, weight 7.946 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 85 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Ares right; reverse AMI−ΣOY, sword in sheath with strap; $32.00 (27.20)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RS64667. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 419a; RIC V, part 2, 93; Mairat 56; Schulzki AGK 102; Elmer 190; Cunetio 2400; SRCV III -, VF, well centered, die wear, weak center, edge cracks, weight 3.485 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 45o, Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) mint, 262 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Mars standing right, helmeted, nude but for paludamentum on shoulders, vertical spear in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield at side; $29.00 (24.65)







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Ares or Mars