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Home>Catalog>Themes>Gods,Olympians>AresorMarsPAGE 1/212
Ares or Mars

God of war and bloodshed. Symbols include the boar and the spear. Son of Zeus and Hera.


Roman Republic, L. Valerius Flaccus, 108 - 107 B.C.

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Mars and the apex recall that the moneyer's father held the office of Flamen Martialis. Crawford concludes the office of moneyer may have been consider a career substitute for aedileship and the grain on the reverse advertises the moneyer would have distributed grain had he been elected Aedile. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
RR90734. Silver denarius, SRCV I 183, Sydenham 565, Crawford 306/1, RSC I Valeria 11, VF, centered, toned, weak centers, weight 3.834 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 108 - 107 B.C.; obverse winged and draped bust of Victory right, X below chin; reverse LVALERI / FLACCI (downward on left), Mars walking left, spear in right hand, trophy in left over shoulder, apex left, head of grain behind; $150.00 (130.50)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

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On some coins of this type but with the normal MARTI VICTORI reverse legend, the final I is cramped. On at least one reverse die the final letter(s) of the reverse legend were erased and re-engraved to RI. Apparently a number of dies for this type were originally engraved ending in R, like our coin, but few coins were struck with them prior to discovery and correction.
RS68974. Silver denarius, Unlisted legend variant; cf. RSC III 76a (VICTORI), RIC IV 103 (same, draped only), BMCRE V 742 (same, but pl. coin clearly draped & cuirassed), VF, well centered, weight 3.131 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare mint, 202 A.D.; obverse P SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse MARTI VICTOR (sic), Mars advancing right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left; rare variant; $140.00 (121.80)


The Mamertini, Sicily, c. 288 - 278 B.C.

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Mamertini or "children of Mars," was the name taken by a band of Campanian (or Samnite) freebooters who about 289 B.C. seized the Greek colony of Messana at the north-east corner of Sicily, after having been hired by Agathocles to defend it (Polyb. 1. 7. 2). - 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica
GB67344. Bronze pentonkion, Calciati I p. 93, 3/1; SNG ANS 402; BMC Sicily p. 109, 3; SNG Cop 434 var (on reverse Φ left), gF, some corrosion and pitting, weight 16.288 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 270o, Messana mint, c. 288 - 278 B.C.; obverse APEΣ, laureate head of Ares right, Macedonian helmet behind; reverse MAMEPTINΩN, eagle standing left on a thunderbolt, head left, wings open; $135.00 (117.45)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars represented military power as a way to secure peace, and was a father (pater) of the Roman people. The stalk of grain may refer to Mars' roll as an agricultural guardian.
RS90448. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 939 (R); RSC II 129; BnF III 179; BMCRE II 203, SRCV I -, VF, luster, well centered, weight 3.354 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS VIII, Mars standing left, nude but for helmet and chlamys, spear in right hand, trophy in left, grain ear on right; ex Heritage CICF World and Ancients Signature Auction 3032, part of lot 30530; rare; $135.00 (117.45)


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

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Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS70207. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Vespasian 948 (C); RSC II 65; BMCRE II Vespasian 221; BnF III Vespasian 195; SRCV I -, F, toned, nice portrait, weight 3.118 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate head right; reverse COS VI, Mars standing left, nude but for crested helmet and cloak behind in belt at waist, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of captured arms in left; $125.00 (108.75)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.; EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, I, QXXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click "EQVITI" to read the NumisWiki article, "Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark." The letter "I" in the reverse field is the fourth letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter "Q" in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the fourth officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA62615. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 509, EF, weight 3.910 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 281 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left; reverse MARTI PACIF, Mars advancing left, holding olive-branch, shield and spear, I left, QXXI in ex; sharp strike with full silvering, some hoard patina remaining; $120.00 (104.40)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 278 A.D., Probus defeated the Alamanni, expelled the Franks from Gaul, reorganized the Roman defenses on the Rhine and resettled the Germanic tribes in the devastated provinces. He adopted the titles Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus.
RB47015. Silvered antoninianus, Alfldi Siscia V type 96, n 79; RIC V 811 var (bust type), Choice EF, weight 3.844 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 278 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, Mars walking right, nude but for cloak flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, XXIS in ex; full silvering and centering, slightly flat reverse; $115.00 (100.05)


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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RB46815. Bronze antoninianus, BnF XII 2391, Venra Hoard 1727, RIC V -, gVF, weight 3.022 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, 275 - 276 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate, bare chest bust with slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse CONSERVAT MILIT, Emperor standing left, holding scepter, receiving globe from Mars standing right holding spear, B in center, KA in ex; unusual, rare bust type for the era; rare; $110.00 (95.70)


Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 100 - 85 B.C.

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We have been unable to find another example with this flower(?) or palm(?) control symbol on the reverse.
BB63160. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 311 var, BMC Pontus p. 100, 49 var; SNG BM 1528 ff. var; SNG Stancomb 795 var; SNGvA 227 var (none with this symbol left), VF, weight 8.575 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sinope mint, 100 - 85 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Ares right; reverse ΣINΩ−ΠHΣ, sword in scabbard, flower(?) or palm(?) lower left; rare, unpublished(?); $110.00 (95.70)


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

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Aurelian probably joined the army in 235, a year that began an era of crisis, imperial assassinations, invasions, civil wars, plagues, and economic depression, which severely damaged the army. He distinguished himself in battle and successes as a cavalry commander eventually made him a member of emperor Gallienus' entourage. Claudius gave him command of the elite Dalmatian cavalry, and then promoted him to Master of Horse (second in command of the army after the Emperor). As emperor, Aurelian's successful restoration of the Army enabled him to defeat the Alamanni, Goths, Vandals, Juthungi, Sarmatians, and the Palmyrene Empire effectively ending the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century.
RB66589. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 366, Cohen VI 206, EF, perfect centering, weight 4.087 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 135o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse RESTITVTOR EXERCITI (restorer of the army), Aurelian standing left holding scepter and presenting globe to Mars, also holding scepter, helmeted, standing right, A in center, XXI in ex; scarce; $95.00 (82.65)


The Mamertini, Sicily, c. 275 - 264 B.C.

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Mamertini or "children of Mars," was the name taken by a band of Campanian (or Samnite) freebooters who about 289 B.C. seized the Greek colony of Messana at the north-east corner of Sicily, after having been hired by Agathocles to defend it (Polyb. 1. 7. 2). - 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica
GB69014. Bronze pentonkion, HGC 2 865 (lists A control symbol); cf. Calciati I p. 93, 4; SNG Cop 434; SNG ANS 403; BMC Sicily p. 109, 4 (all Φ vice A), VF, rough, weight 16.666 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 225o, Messana mint, c. 275 - 264 B.C.; obverse APEΣ, laureate head of Ares right, Macedonian helmet (control symbol) behind; reverse MAMEPTINΩN, eagle standing left on a thunderbolt, head left, wings open, A (control symbol) left; $80.00 (69.60)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS73366. Silver denarius, RSC III 76, RIC IV 103, BMCRE V 742, SRCV II 7179, VF, small flan, weight 1.830 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 202 A.D.; obverse P SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES, draped bust right, from behind; reverse MARTI VICTORI, Mars advancing right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left; scarce; $70.00 (60.90)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

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In 226 A.D., the Parthian Empire fell. King Ardashir I, ruler of the Sassanid dynasty, defeated Artabanus V and was crowned "King of Kings" of the Persian Empire, beginning the 400 year-reign of the Sassanid Empire.
RB71791. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 440, BMCRE VI 357, Cohen IV 282, F, nice portrait, well centered on a tight flan, weight 21.870 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M AVR SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P V COS II P P, Mars advancing right, nude but for helmet and cloak waving behind, transverse spear in right, trophy over shoulder in left, S - C flanking at knees; $65.00 (56.55)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 100 - 85 B.C.

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The grooves in this coin are not scratches made in circulation. They are "adjustment marks" made at the mint during manufacture of the flan, prior to striking.
GB56855. Bronze AE 20, SNG BM 1148, SNG Stancomb 676, SNGvA 64, SGCV II 3643, aVF, flan adjustment marks, weight 7.946 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 85 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Ares right; reverse AMI−ΣOY, sword in sheath with strap; $60.00 (52.20)


Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D., Struck by Aureolus

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Struck by Aureolus in the name of Postumus during his hold of Milan against Gallienus. Gallienus died during the siege but the new emperor Claudius brought the rebellion to an end.
RB60402. Bronze antoninianus, RIC V 388, Cunetio 2485 - 2488, VF, small flan, weight 3.303 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 315o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, obverse IMP POSTVMVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS EQVIT, Mars or Virtus, in military dress, advancing right, transverse spear in right hand, shield in left, T in ex; $60.00 (52.20)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Gallienus paid particular adoration to Mars. He raised a temple to the worship of Mars in the Circus Flaminus and called the god Propugnator (champion or defender). "Mars the Pacifier" may be seen as ironic today, but the Romans knew that victory in war (hopefully including the total destruction of your enemy) is an effective way to achieve peace.
RA64612. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 889i, Cunetio 0714, Elmer 85, SRCV III 10195, RIC V J10 var (bust, Lugdunum), RSC IV 150 var (same), F, struck with worn dies, weight 3.754 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) mint, 259 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse DEO MARTI, Mars standing left within hexastyle temple, helmeted, nude, resting right hand on grounded shield, inverted spear vertical behind in left; rare with this bust; $60.00 (52.20)


The Mamertini, Sicily, c. 220 - 200 B.C.

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Mamertini or "children of Mars," was the name taken by a band of Campanian (or Samnite) freebooters who about 289 B.C. seized the Greek colony of Messana at the north-east corner of Sicily, after having been hired by Agathocles to defend it (Polyb. 1. 7. 2). - 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica
GB66277. Bronze pentonkion, cf. Calciati I p. 101, 25; BMC Sicily p. 112, 32; SNG ANS 423; SNG Cop 446, F, green patina, weight 10.481 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Messana mint, c. 220 - 200 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Ares left; reverse MAMEPTINΩN, warrior walking left, with right holding head and leading horse behind, transverse spear in left, Π left; $60.00 (52.20)


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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RB46795. Silvered antoninianus, Bastien IX 100; RIC V 30, VF, weight 3.574 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 1 Jan - Jun 276 A.D.; obverse IMP CL TACITVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse MARS VICTOR, Mars walking right, nude but for cloak flying behind, spear in right and trophy in left across shoulder, B left, * right; scarce; $55.00 (47.85)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 277 Probus began his campaign in Gaul, clearing the Goths and Germanic tribes from the province.
RB46831. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 816, Choice VF, weight 4.683 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 277 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle tipped scepter in right; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, Mars walking right, nude but for helmet and cloak flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, P lower right, XXI in ex; extensive silvering, full circles centering, nicer than photo suggest; $55.00 (47.85)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 120 - 63 B.C.

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The grooves in this coin are not scratches made in circulation. They are "adjustment marks" made at the mint during manufacture of the flan, prior to striking.
GB90170. Bronze AE 21, BMC Pontus p. 17, 48; SNG BM 1161; SNG Stancomb 679 var (another monogram right); SGCV II 3643, F, some corrosion, flan adjustment marks, weight 8.152 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 120 - 63 B.C.; obverse head of Ares right in crested helmet; reverse AMI−ΣOY, sword in sheath with strap, star in crescent upper left, monogram lower left, IB upper right; $50.00 (43.50)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 100 - 85 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB72621. Brass AE 19, SNG BM 1148, SNG Stancomb 676, SNGvA 64, SGCV II 3643, aVF, weight 7.414 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 85 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Ares right; reverse AMI−ΣOY, sword in sheath with strap; $50.00 (43.50)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Siscia, a chief town and colony of Pannonia, was located at confluence of the Colapis and Savus, and is now called Sisak, Croatia. The Roman imperial mint operated from 260 to c. 390 A.D. The mint master was called procurator monetae Siscianae.
RB46821. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 810, gVF, weight 3.778 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle tipped scepter in right; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, Mars walking right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, XXIS in ex; full circles strike, extensive silvering; $45.00 (39.15)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Marking coins with numbers in ink was once a common practice for museums and collectors. It has been out of fashion for many decades. Unfortunately the origin of the number is not known.
RA41941. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 570a, RIC V S236, RSC IV 617a, SRCV III 10288 (264 - 266), VF, weight 3.751 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 8th emission, 256 - 257 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse MARTI PACIFERO, Mars standing half left, olive branch raised in right hand, resting left on grounded shield, spear behind, A in left field, old ink museum number (34) lower left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $40.00 (34.80)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RB90365. Orichalcum dupondius, cf. RIC II, part 1, 293; BMCRE II 308; Cohen I 427; BnF III 330; cf. SRCV I 2789 (COS X), aF, weight 10.169 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 85 - 86 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI, radiate head right, wearing aegis; reverse Mars advancing left, wearing military garb, parazonium on left side, Victory in extended right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, S - C flanking low across field; $40.00 (34.80)


Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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RS57881. Silver antoninianus, RIC V 57, VF, weight 3.589 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 45o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 262 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Mars walking right, spear transverse in right, trophy over shoulder in left; $36.00 (31.32)




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Catalog current as of Saturday, April 25, 2015.
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Ares or Mars