Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Please login or register to view your wish list! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Please login or register to view your wish list! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! All blue text is linked. Click for a definition or other information. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ HistoryView Options:  |  |  |     

Collecting History through Ancient Coins

Holding an ancient coin is holding history in your hands. Some coins actually depict historical events. Many include the image of a historic king or emperor. Every ancient coin relates to the people and events of the time and place it was struck. Every ancient coin relates to an interesting historical story. The stories on this page are a primary source of our ancient coin obsession. We hope you enjoy them.


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

Click for a larger photo
Aelia Flaccilla was a fervent supporter of the Nicene Creed. Sozomen reports her preventing a conference between Theodosius and Eunomius of Cyzicus who served as figurehead of Anomoeanism, a sect of Arians. Ambrose and Gregory of Nyssa praise her Christian virtue and comment on her role as "a leader of justice" and "pillar of the Church." She is commemorated as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church; her feast day is 14 September.
RL70543. Bronze AE 4, RIC IX Siscia 35, VF, excellent centering, weight 0.926 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, BSIS• in exergue; scarce (R2); $225.00 (€195.75)


Otacilia Severa, Augusta February or March 244 - September or October 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pudicitia was the personification of modesty and chastity.
RB30704. Orichalcum sestertius, SRCV III 9169, RIC IV 209a, Cohen V 55, Hunter III - (p. cxi), VF, weight 16.513 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG, diademed draped bust right; reverse PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia seated left, drawing veil from face with right hand, long transverse scepter in left, S C in exergue; $200.00 (€174.00)


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

Click for a larger photo
Faustina I was the wife of Antoninus Pius. Little is known of her, except that she was regarded as vain and frivolous, though this may have just been malicious gossip. Antoninus Pius loved her greatly, and upon her death in 141 A.D. she was deified and a temple was built in her honor.
SH65151. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1118, BMCRE IV 1514, Cohen 88, SRCV II 4614, Nice VF, green patina, small patina edge chip on rev, weight 27.399 g, maximum diameter 32.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, pearls in hair and hair in elaborate bun on top; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing facing, veiled head left, torch raised in right hand, stalks of grain downward in left, S - C flanking across field; $200.00 (€174.00)


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III, 238 - 244 A.D., Alexander and Bucephalus

Click for a larger photo
Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 B.C. Philonicus the Thessalian, a horse dealer, offered a massive wild stallion to Alexander's father, King Philip II. Since no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. Alexander, however, seeing that the horse was afraid of his own shadow, promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was given a chance and surprised all by subduing it. Alexander spoke soothingly to the horse and turned it towards the sun so that it could no longer see its shadow. Eventually Bucephalus allowed Alexander to ride him. Embarrassed, Philip commented "O my son, look thee out a kingdom equal to and worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee." Alexander named the horse Bucephalus because the horse's head seemed "as broad as a bull's." Bucephalus died of battle wounds in 326 B.C., in Alexander's last battle. Alexander founded the city of Bucephala (thought to be the modern town of Jhelum, Pakistan) in memory of his wonderful horse.
SH65202. Bronze AE 26, AMNG III 724; cf BMC Macedonia p. 22, 102 (one neokorie); SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Bar -; SNG Saroglos -; Lindgren -, F, weight 10.822 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Beroea(?) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOINON MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ, Alexander galloping left on his horse Bucephalus, about to spear a lion leaping left below; rare; $200.00 (€174.00)


Plautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Wife of Caracalla

Click for a larger photo
Although this coin suggests Caracalla and Plautilla desired an heir, it would have been difficult because their mutual hatred was so strong they even refused to dine together. Their marriage was likely never consummated. After the fall and execution of her father, Caracalla's Praetorian Prefect, she was exiled to the Lipari islands and executed in 212 A.D.
RS68921. Silver denarius, RIC IV 367, RSC III 16, BMCRE V 422, SRCV II 7072, VF, excellent centering, weight 2.582 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 203 A.D.; obverse PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse PIETAS AVGG, Pietas standing facing, head right, long scepter in right, child in left; scarce; $200.00 (€174.00)


Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal

Click for a larger photo
Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB72290. Bronze AE 17, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646; SNG Cop 613 var (divided ethnic); BMC Italy p. 131, 12 var (same), VF, green patina, weight 3.570 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 225o, Arpi mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse APΠANOY (upward on left), bunch of grapes; rare; $200.00 (€174.00)


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

Click for a larger photo
Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
SL73983. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III M1728; BMCRE IV p. 575, 1194; Cohen III 2; Hunter II 47; MIR Szaivert 24; SRCV II 5496, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (3761245-013), weight 26.30 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 2nd issue, c. 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waved and fastened in a chignon; reverse CERES, Ceres seated left on a basket (cista mystica) from which a snake is emerging, two stalks of grain in right hand, torch in left, S - C flanking across field; ex Johnathan K. Kern; $185.00 (€160.95)


Carthaginians in Italy, Second Punic War, 215 - 205 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Head of Tanit / horse head types were likely struck at many different mints in the Punic realm. The style of this particular type, which was struck in Italy during the Second Punic War, is very atypical. Robinson suggested Locri as the possible mint, noting similarity between the style of Tanit on this type and Persephone on Locri bronzes.
GB72269. Bronze AE 19, cf. SNG Cop VIII 373; Robinson NC 1964, p. 53, 5(c) and pl. VII, 5 (Locri), F, green patina, scratches, weight 6.491 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 315o, Bruttium, Lokri Epizephrioi(?) mint, under Hannibal, c. 215 - 205 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wearing wreath of grain; reverse horse head right, no letters or symbols; rare; $180.00 (€156.60)


Plautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Wife of Caracalla

Click for a larger photo
Concordia, the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony, did not favor Plautilla and Caracalla. Plautilla and Caracalla hated each other, lived separately, and the marriage was likely never consummated. After the fall and execution of her father, Caracalla's Praetorian Prefect, she was exiled to the Lipari islands and executed in 212 A.D.
RS73191. Silver denarius, SRCV II 7065, RIC IV 363, RSC III 1, BMCRE V 411, VF, perfect centering, nice style, frosty surfaces, weight 3.620 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 202 - 22 January 205 A.D.; obverse PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG, Concordia standing half left, patera in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; scarce; $180.00 (€156.60)


Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal

Click for a larger photo
Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB73614. Bronze AE 20, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646; SNG Cop 613; BMC Italy p. 131, 12, F, weight 3.792 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 270o, Arpi mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse APΠANOY, bunch of grapes; rare; $170.00 (€147.90)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Although many coin reference books classify Fecunditas as a personification of fertility rather than as an actual deity, Fecunditas was recognized as a Roman divinity by Nero, who erected a statue to her. Tacitus notes that upon the birth of Claudia Neronis, the senate decreed the construction of a temple of Fertility to be built at Antium. Fecunditas is always portrayed as a female figure holding a child, or children and often a scepter, cornucopia, palm branch or caduceus. Sometimes the children are depicted standing at her feet. Coins portraying her usually advertise the fertility of the imperial family.
RB73634. Copper as, RIC IV SA669, BMCRE VI 924, Cohen IV 9, SRCV II 8241, aVF, green patina, light roughness, weight 9.921 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 15th emission, c. 232 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right; reverse FECVNDITAS AVGVSTAE, Fecunditas standing left, extending right hand over child standing before her with arms raised, cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking very low in field; ex CNG e-auction 243 (27 Oct 2010), lot 385; ex J.S. Wagner Collection; $165.00 (€143.55)


Herennia Etruscilla, Augusta July 249 - April/August 253 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pudicitia was the personification of modesty and chastity.
RS69200. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 59b, RSC IV 19, Hunter III 10, SRCV III 9495, aEF, attractive portrait, weight 3.927 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 250 A.D.; obverse HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, on crescent; reverse PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia (modesty) seated left, drawing veil from face with right hand, scepter in left hand; $160.00 (€139.20)


Herennia Etruscilla, Augusta July 249 - April/August 253 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pudicitia was the personification of modesty and chastity.
RS70595. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 59b, RSC IV 19, Hunter III 10, SRCV III 9495, gVF, well centered, weight 4.296 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 250 A.D.; obverse HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, on crescent; reverse PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia (modesty) seated left, drawing veil from face with right hand, scepter in left hand; $160.00 (€139.20)


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

Click for a larger photo
Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
RS71603. Silver denarius, RIC III Pius 358, RSC II 93, BMCRE IV Pius 389, SRCV II 4581, VF, centered, nice reverse detail, scratch, weight 3.218 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 141 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing slightly right, long scepter vertical behind in right, two heads of grain in left; $160.00 (€139.20)


Herennia Etruscilla, Augusta July 249 - April/August 253 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pudicitia was the personification of modesty and chastity.
RS74470. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 59b, RSC IV 19, Hunter III 10, SRCV III 9495, Choice EF, weight 4.389 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 250 A.D.; obverse HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, on crescent; reverse PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia (modesty) seated left on throne, drawing veil from face with right hand, scepter in left hand; $160.00 (€139.20)


Siculo-Punic, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The head on this type is often identified as the female goddess Tanit. It is apparently a male head (Carthaginian men wore earrings). The style of the type varies, perhaps indicating different mints, and some of the heads do look feminine.
GB68302. Bronze AE 16, Viola CNP 126, SNG Cop VIII 96 ff. (=SNG Cop I 1022 ff.), SNG München 1626 ff., SNG Morcom 897, Alexandropoulos 15, Choice gVF, nice green patina, weight 4.058 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 135.0o, Carthage or Sicilian mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; obverse male head left, wreathed in grain, wearing hoop earring; reverse free horse prancing right, short exergual line below rear hooves, linear border; $150.00 (€130.50)


Otacilia Severa, Augusta, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Zeugma, Commagene, Syria

Click for a larger photo
A tetrastyle temple is a temple with four columns. A peribolos is a court enclosed by a wall, especially one surrounding an ancient Greek or Roman temple.
GB90700. Bronze AE 29, BMC Galatia p. 128, 34; Butcher 31b; SNG München 435 var (capricorn right); SGICV 4056 var (same); SNG Cop -, Choice VF, perfect centering, weight 18.168 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 180o, Zeugma mint, Feb 244 - end Sep 249 A.D.; obverse MAP ΩTAKIΛ CEOYHPAN CEB, draped bust right, wearing stephane, crescent behind shoulders; reverse ZEYΓM−ATEΩN, tetrastyle temple with peribolos enclosing the sacred grove of trees, statue of seated Zeus within temple, capricorn left in exergue; $150.00 (€130.50)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Lucifer means lightbringer, from the Latin lux light and ferre to bear or bring. The word Lucifer is found in only one place in the Bible -- Isaiah 14:12 -- but only in the King James and related versions: How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! The King James Version is based on the Vulgate, the Latin translation of Jerome. Jerome translated the Hebrew helel (bright or brilliant one) as lucifer, which was a reasonable Latin equivalent. And yet it is this lucifer, the bright one or lightbearer, that came to be understood by so many as the name for Satan, Lord of Darkness.
RS73648. Silver denarius, RIC IV C373a; RSC III 32; BMCRE V p. 430, 1; Hunter III 1; SRCV II 7100, Choice gVF, excellent portrait, full circle centering, some reverse die wear, weight 3.070 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, under Caracalla, c. 214 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, ornate hairstyle with horizontal ridges, flat coil at back of head, and plait on neck; reverse DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing facing, head left, holding flaming long torch transverse left with both hands; $150.00 (€130.50)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Struck in the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Colophon struck this commemorative in the name of Alexander the Great under the rule of Lysimachus. The city also issued the same type with the same symbols in the name of King Lysimachus (examples are listed in Forum's catalog). Colophon was about 15 miles (24 km) northwest of Ephesus.
GS71735. Silver drachm, Price 1842, Müller Alexander 358, SNG Cop 909, VF, toned, porous, weight 4.067 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kolophon mint, c. 301 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, right leg drawn back, lion-forepart over crescent left, pentagram under throne; $145.00 (€126.15)


Herennia Etruscilla, Augusta July 249 - April/August 253 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 250 the Plague of Cyprian, a pandemic probably smallpox, began. It was still raging in 270, when it claimed the life of emperor Claudius II Gothicus. At the height of the outbreak, 5,000 people a day were said to be dying in Rome. The plague caused widespread manpower shortages in agriculture and the Roman army.
RB68394. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 136b, Cohen V 22, VF, light scratches, weight 16.030 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse HERENNIA ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed draped bust right; reverse PVDICITIA AVG S C, Pudicitia (modesty) seated left, drawing veil with right, transverse scepter in left; $140.00 (€121.80)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

Click for a larger photo
Faustina II died in late 175 A.D. in Cappadocia during the imperial trip to the East caused by Cassius' revolt. Although by some sources she can be suspected of infidelity and even participation in that revolt, Marcus deified her and issued commemorative coins such as this one.
RS71383. Silver denarius, RIC III M746, RSC II 75, BMCRE III M725, Szaivert MIR 61, SRCV II 5217, Choice gVF, weight 3.459 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, posthumous, 176 - 180 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right; reverse CONSECRATIO, altar enclosure, door on front; ex Solidus Numismatik e. K.; $140.00 (€121.80)


Domitia, Wife of Domitian, 81 - 96 A.D., Philadelphia, Lydia

Click for a larger photo
Philadelphia, located south-east of Sardeis, was founded by Attalos II Philadelphos, King of Pergamon. It was an important and wealthy trade center that retained its importance until late Byzantine times. Saint Paul and Saint John the Theologian, visited, and established the first Christian churches. St. Ignatius of Antioch visited on his trip to his martyrdom in Rome. Philadelphia is among the Seven Churches named in John's Book of Revelation.
GB71756. Bronze AE 15, RPC II 1336; BMC Lydia, p. 198, 64 - 65; SNG Cop 379; SNG München -, VF, centered, green patina, encrustations, weight 3.350 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 180o, Philadelphia (Amman, Jordan) mint, 81 - 96 A.D.; obverse ∆OMITIA AYΓOYCTA, draped bust right; reverse EΠI ΛAΓETA ΦIΛA∆EΛΦE, bunch of grapes; scarce; $140.00 (€121.80)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Temple of Mercury stood on the northern slopes of the Aventine, near the Circus Maximus. Its depiction on this type likely refers to the "miracle of the Thundering Legion." In 173 A.D., the Legio XII Fulminata, exhausted by thirst, was near defeat in battle with the Quadi. A sudden storm restored the Romans while the thunder and lightning put the enemy to flight. The miracle was officially credited to Mercury. Christian soldiers in the legion, however, claimed it was their prayers and their God who delivered the storm.
RB72337. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1075 (R), MIR 18 258-6/30; Cohen III 535; BMCRE IV 1441; SRCV II 4996, F, corrosion, weight 23.352 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 173 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVIII, laureate head right; reverse IMP VI COS III, tetrastyle temple with herm columns (telamones); statue of Mercury on pedestal within, standing front, head left, wearing petasus and short robe, holding purse in right and caduceus in left; tortoise, cockerel, ram, caduceus, winged helmet, and purse on semicircular pediment; S - C flanking sides, RELIG AVG in exergue; rare; $140.00 (€121.80)


Otacilia Severa, Augusta February or March 244 - September or October 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS73597. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 130, RSC IV 43, Hunter III 8, SRCV III 9158, Choice VF, excellent portrait, centered, toned, weight 3.923 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 247 A.D.; obverse OTACIL SEVERA AVG, draped bust right set on crescent; reverse PIETAS AVGVSTAE, Pietas standing left, veiled, extending right hand, box of incense in left; $140.00 (€121.80)


Otacilia Severa, Augusta, February or March 244 - September or October 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS74472. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 130, RSC IV 43, Hunter III 8, SRCV III 9158, Choice aEF, nice portrait, frosty surfaces, weight 4.829 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 247 A.D.; obverse OTACIL SEVERA AVG, draped bust right set on crescent; reverse PIETAS AVGVSTAE, Pietas, veiled, standing left, extending right, box of incense in left; $140.00 (€121.80)


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

Click for a larger photo
Aelia Flaccilla was a fervent supporter of the Nicene Creed. Sozomen reports her preventing a conference between Theodosius and Eunomius of Cyzicus who served as figurehead of Anomoeanism, a sect of Arians. Ambrose and Gregory of Nyssa praise her Christian virtue and comment on her role as "a leader of justice" and "pillar of the Church." She is commemorated as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church; her feast day is 14 September.
RL65425. Bronze AE 4, RIC IX Siscia 35, Choice EF, weight 1.168 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 45o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, BSIS• in exergue; scarce (R2); $135.00 (€117.45)


Fausta, Augusta 324 - 326 A.D., Second Wife of Constantine the Great

Click for a larger photo
Fausta is depicted as Spes, the Roman personification of hope. She holds her infant children, Constantine II and Constantius II, her hopeful promise for the future of the "Republic."
RL70607. Bronze AE 3, RIC Heraclea VII 80, aEF, green patina, well centered, slight porosity, weight 3.379 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 315o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 325 - 326 A.D.; obverse FLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG, draped bust right, hair waived, bun at back, wearing pearl necklace; reverse SPES REIP-VBLICAE, Fausta standing facing, looking left, holding infants Constantine II and Constantius II, SMH∆ in ex; rare; $135.00 (€117.45)


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

Click for a larger photo
Ceres' known mythology is indistinguishable from Demeter's. Her virgin daughter Proserpina (Persephone) was abducted by Hades to be his wife in the underworld. Ceres searched for her endlessly lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Ceres (Demeter) searched, she was preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse on the world that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Proserpina back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Ceres grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Proserpina's return brings the spring.
SL73986. Silver denarius, RIC III 362, BMCRE IV 421, RSC II 104, SRCV II 4584, NGC Ch VF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5, (4162520-008), weight 3.00 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing facing, head left, long torch in right hand, raising drapery with left; $135.00 (€117.45)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

Click for a larger photo
Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
SL73988. Silver denarius, RIC III M728; RSC II 249; BMCRE p. 406, M166; Hunter II p. 353, 24; cf. SRCV II 5266 (dove vice apple), NGC Ch VF, strike 5/5, surface 4/5, (4161256-012), weight 3.35 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse VENVS, Venus standing slightly left, head left, apple in extended right hand, long scepter near vertical in left; $135.00 (€117.45)


Otacilia Severa, Augusta February or March 244 - September or October 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Juno (Hera) was the wife and older sister of Jupiter (Zeus). She was a goddess of women and marriage. The cow and the peacock were sacred to her.
RS90441. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 127 (S), RSC IV 20, Hunter III 6, SRCV III 9152, gVF, weight 2.877 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 245 - 247 A.D.; obverse M OTACIL SEVERA AVG, draped bust right set on crescent; reverse IVNO CONSERVAT, Juno standing left, patera in right, long scepter vertical in left; scarce; $130.00 (€113.10)


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

Click for a larger photo
Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RB71296. Copper sestertius, RIC III 1081, Cohen 282, Strack III 1224, SRCV II -, F, some pitting and corrosion, weight 25.927 g, maximum diameter 33.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 138 - 141 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII P P, draped bust right; reverse VENERI AVGVSTAE, Venus standing right, raising drapery on shoulder with right, apple raised in extended left, S - C flanking across field; $130.00 (€113.10)


Roman Republic, L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus, 89 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This moneyer traced his descent from the Sabines and perhaps from King Tatius himself. Tarpeia was daughter of the commander of the citadel in Rome. She offered to open the gates for the besieging Sabines, if they would give her what they wore on their left arms, meaning their gold bracelets. The Sabines were unable to enter the citadel; its open gates were miraculously protected by boiling jets of water created by Janus. Keeping their promise, the Sabines threw the shields they worn on their left arms upon Tarpeia, crushing her to death, and then they kicked her off a cliff. This myth was likely used to explain the Tarpeian Rock, a cliff on the Capitoline Hill from which murderers and traitors were thrown.
RR71940. Silver denarius, Crawford 344/2c, Sydenham 699a, RSC I Tituria 5, BMCRR I Rome 2326, SRCV I 252, aVF, toned, weight 3.332 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 89 B.C.; obverse bare head of Sabine King Tatius right, palm frond below chin, SABIN behind, A.PV (argento publico) before; reverse Tarpeia buried to her waist in shields, trying to repel soldiers who are about to cast shields upon her, star over and within crescent with horns up above, left TITVRI in exergue; from the Andrew McCabe collection, ex Roma Numismatics e-auctions 10, lot 578; $130.00 (€113.10)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS71657. Silver drachm, Price 1406, Müller Alexander 821, SNG Cop 988, SNG Alpha Bank 586, VF, toned, porous, weight 3.922 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, right leg drawn back, eagle in right, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left, KI left, ME under throne; $130.00 (€113.10)


St. Helena, Augusta 8 November 324 - 328 to 330 A.D., Mother of Constantine the Great

Click for a larger photo
 
RL72016. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Nicomedia 129 (R2), SRCV IV 16620, LRBC I 1100, Cohen VII 12, Choice gVF, weight 3.792 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 325 - 326 A.D.; obverse FL HELENA AVGVSTA, pearl diademed and draped bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas standing half left, branch pointed down in right, raising pallium with left, MN∆ in ex; rare; $130.00 (€113.10)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
SH51524. Copper as, SRCV II 6641, RIC IV S877, Choice aVF, weight 8.881 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 198 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse HILARITAS S C, Hilaritas standing half left, grounded palm frond in right, cornucopia in left; beautiful green patina; $125.00 (€108.75)


Carthage, Zeugitana, 221 - 210 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siege-craft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and, in Iberia, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.Hannibal's route of invasion
GB90106. Bronze AE 21, Viola CNP 106e; Alexandropoulos pl. 4, 90; SNG Cop 309 ff. var (different Punic letter); SGCV II 6518 var (same), gF, weight 6.816 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, 221 - 210 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain; reverse horse standing right, head turned back, right foreleg raised, Punic letter gimel below; During the period this coin was struck Rome fought two major wars simultaneously: the First Macedonian War against Philip V and the Second Punic War against Hannibal. Rome would later be victorious in both conflicts and emerge as the sole superpower in the Mediterranean.; $125.00 (€108.75)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS74151. Silver denarius, SRCV II 6600, RIC IV S572, BMCRE V S165, RSC III 150, gVF, well centered and struck, toned (reverse a little darker), a few small marks, small flan cracks, weight 3.353 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 204 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse PIETAS AVGG, Pietas standing half left, veiled, dropping incense on altar with right hand, box in left hand; $125.00 (€108.75)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This type refers to Severus' victories over Parthia. Severus assumed the title "Parthicus Maximus," greatest of Parthian conquerors.
RS75004. Silver denarius, RIC IV 176, RSC III 370, BMCRE V 256, cf. SRCV II 6323 (TR P X COS III, 202 A.D.), gVF, nice portrait, attractive toning, excellent centering, some reverse die wear, weight 3.404 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, Rome mint, 201 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PART MAX P M TR P VIIII, trophy of captured arms, flanked by two captives seated facing outward and wearing pointed caps; $125.00 (€108.75)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
When Severus died in 211, Julia became the mediator between their two quarreling sons, Caracalla and Geta, who were to rule as joint emperors. Caracalla convinced his mother to call Geta for a reconciliation meeting in her residence. It was a trick. In his mother's house, Caracalla's soldiers attacked and Geta died in their mother's arms. afterward, Julia's relationship with Caracalla was understandably difficult. Nevertheless, she accompanied him on his Parthian campaign in 217. During this trip, Caracalla was assassinated, after which Julia committed suicide. Her body was brought to Rome and she was later deified.
RB90932. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC IV Caracalla C603, Cohen IV 179, SRCV II 7133, VF, nice patina, weight 11.382 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, reign of Caracalla, 216 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped and diademed bust right; reverse SAECVLI FELICITAS, Felicitas standing left, sacrificing from patera in right, cornucopia in left, altar at left, S - C across field; $120.00 (€104.40)


Otacilia Severa, Augusta February or March 244 - September or October 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In Roman religion, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. The cult of Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was of special importance to the imperial household. She is usually depicted wearing a long cloak and holding a patera (sacrificial bowl), a cornucopia (symbol of prosperity), or a caduceus (symbol of peace).
RS74471. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 9149, RIC IV 126, RSC IV 17, Hunter III - (p. xci), Choice VF, weight 3.345 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 246 - 248 A.D.; obverse M OTACIL SEVERA AVG, draped bust right set on crescent; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG, Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, single cornucopia in left, altar at feet on left; $120.00 (€104.40)


Crispina, Augusta 178 - 182 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pudicitia was the personification of modesty and chastity.
RB75894. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 670 (Commodus); Szaivert MIR 18, 16-6a; BMCRE IV 419 (Commodus); Cohen III 30; SRCV II, F, weight 22.695 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 178 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair knotted in a bun in back; reverse PVDICITIA, Pudicitia seated left, right hand on breast, left hand at side, S - C across field; scarce; $120.00 (€104.40)


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

Click for a larger photo
The Christogram, a ligature of Chi and Rho, the first two letters of Christ in Greek, was an early symbol for Christianity. The crucifix was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because most people then had personally witnessed its gruesome use for public execution.
RL63886. Bronze AE 4, RIC IX Constantinople 61, SRCV 4194, aEF, weight 1.464 g, maximum diameter 12.1 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, CONE in ex; scarce; $110.00 (€95.70)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Perinthos, Thrace

Click for a larger photo
Perinthos, later called Heraclea and Marmara Eregli today, is 90 km west of Istanbul near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea. It is said to have been a Samian colony, founded about 599 B.C. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself.
GB71343. Bronze AE 19, Varbanov III 100 (R6), Schönert Perinthos 379, BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, F, crude, uneven strike, tight flan, weight 3.514 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, obverse CABINA CEBACTH, draped bust right, wearing stephane; reverse ΠEPINΘIWN, Demeter standing left, two stalks of grain in right, long torch vertical behind in left; rare; $110.00 (€95.70)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Berenice II and Ptolemy III, 244 - 221 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In "The Ptolemaic mint of Ras Ibn Hani," INR 2, pp. 63 - 75, Catherine Lorber identifies the mint as Ras Ibn Hani "a Ptolemaic stronghold on the Syrian coast near Lattaqiyah (ancient Laodicea ad Mare)."
GP71897. Bronze dichalkon, Svoronos 1056 (Gaza or Joppa), Noeske 131 (Gaza), Cox Curium 83 (Uncertain mint), Paphos II 57, SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, Weiser -, Hosking -, F, glossy dark patina with earthen highlighting, tiny pitting, weight 3.754 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Phoenician mint, 244 - 221 B.C.; obverse BASILISSWS BEPENIKHΣ, diademed and draped bust of Berenice II right, hair in melon coiffure; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, EY left, two oval countermarks; $105.00 (€91.35)


Domitia, Wife of Domitian, who reigned 81-96 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Domitia married Domitian in 70 A.D. She died in the reign of Trajan or Antoninus Pius.
RS73443. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RIC II, part 1, Domitian, 156; BMCRE II 65; BnF III 72 (official, solid silver, Rome mint, 82 - 83 A.D.), Fine/Fair, holed, weight 1.979 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial counterfeiter mint, c. 82 - 96 A.D.; obverse DOMITIA AVGVSTA IMP DOMIT, draped bust of Domitia right, hair massed in front and in long plait behind; reverse PIETAS AVGVST, Pietas seated left, extending right hand to child seated left at her feet, scepter in left; $105.00 (€91.35)


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius, Tribal Imitative

Click for a larger photo
This coin was struck outside the Roman Empire, perhaps by Celts or the Getae, northeast of Dacia and Pannonia. Getae was the name given by the Greeks to several Thracian tribes inhabiting the regions to either side of the Lower Danube, in what is today northern Bulgaria and Romania.
RS90484. Silver denarius, for possible prototype, cf. BMCRE p. 22, RSC 139a, RIC -, Cohen - (official issue, Rome mint, 139 - 141 A.D.), F, weight 2.603 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, tribal mint, c. 140 - 150 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA(?), Ceres standing half left, raising right hand, long torch in left; $100.00 (€87.00)


Byzantine Empire, Constantine VII and Zoe, 914 - 919 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Constantine VII was a minor when his uncle, Alexander, died leaving him as emperor. Constantine's mother, Zoe, soon took control. However after Zoe failed to halt a growing Bulgarian threat, the regency passed to Romanus I Lecapenus, commander of the fleet, a much more able leader.
BZ71739. Bronze follis, DOC III, part 2, 22; Sommer 36.14; Wroth BMC 1; Morrisson BnF 1; Ratto 1883; SBCV 1758, VF, Constantine's face obscured (unstruck or hammered by someone that didn't like him?), weight 6.337 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 914 - 919 A.D.; obverse COnStAnt' CE ZOH b', Constantine VII facing, beardless, wearing loros and crown with cross, holding long patriarchal cross with Zoe, wearing crown and chlamys; reverse COnSt/tAntino' / CE ZOH bA/SILIS Ro/meon in five lines; $100.00 (€87.00)


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 350 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
By the 4th Century B.C., Sicily had become an obsession for Carthage. For sixty years, Carthaginian and Greek forces engaged in a constant series of skirmishes. By 340 B.C., Carthage had been pushed entirely into the southwest corner of the island, and an uneasy peace reigned over the island.
GB49127. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 121, F, weight 3.177 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 45o, Sicilian? mint, c. 350 B.C.; obverse youthful male head left between two stalks of grain; reverse horse galloping to right; overstruck on a Carthaginian bronze with head of Tanit / horse with palm behind; $95.00 (€82.65)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Isis was the goddess of motherhood and fertility in Ancient Egyptian religious beliefs, whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. In later myths about Isis, she had a brother, Osiris, who became her husband, and she then was said to have conceived Horus.
RS69956. Silver denarius, RSC III 174, RIC IV S577, SRCV II 6606, VF, weight 3.223 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 196 - 211 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse SAECVLI FELICITAS, Isis nursing the infant Horus, right foot on prow, anchor rests against altar behind; uncommon reverse type; $95.00 (€82.65)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Perge, Pamphylia

Click for a larger photo
The monumental fountain or nymphaeum of Perga consists of a wide pool, and behind it a two-storeyed richly worked facade. From its inscription, it is apparent that the structure was dedicated to Artemis Pergaia, Septimius Severus, his wife Julia Domna, and their sons. An inscription belonging to the facade, various facade fragments, and marble statues of Septimius Severus and his wife, all found in excavations of the nymphaeum, are now in the Antalya Museum. Nymphaeum of Perge
RP69817. Bronze AE 18, SNG Cop 323 var (CEB), Lindgren A1108A var (same), SNG Pfälzer 317 var (same), SNG BnF -, BMC Lycia -, SGICV -, Nice aVF, weight 4.618 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Perga mint, obverse IOYΛIA ∆OMNA CE, draped bust right; reverse ΠEPΓAMΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing long chiton, hair in bun, arrow downward at side in right, bow in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; very rare; $95.00 (€82.65)




    



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Wednesday, September 02, 2015.
Page created in 6.973 seconds
History