Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Please login or register to view your wish list! STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 29 JULY All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Please login or register to view your wish list! STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 29 JULY Layaway and reserve are not available during the sale. Shop now and save!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Crisis and Decline ▸ Philip IView Options:  |  |  | 

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Marcus Julius Verus Philippus, known as Philip I "The Arab," was the Praetorian Prefect, and successor to Gordian III whom he possibly had murdered. After signing a treaty with the Persians, he returned home. During his reign the 1000th anniversary of the foundation of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated, and magnificent games were held on a scale rarely seen. In 249 A.D. a series of rebellions occurred, both Philip and his son were killed after their army was defeated near Verona by the forces of Trajan Decius.


Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

Click for a larger photo
When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Legend says Babylas demanded he do penance for the murder of Gordian III before joining the celebration. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RP69864. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 977; BMC Galatia p. 215, 527, F/VF, weight 12.175 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd issue; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩN, towered, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, ∆ - E / S - C across fields, ram leaping right with head turned back above, star below; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

Click for a larger photo
In 248, Trajan Decius put down the revolts of Pacatianus in Moesia and Iotapianus in Syria, by order of Emperor Philip. In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip.
RP57153. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 922, Prieur 375, Dura Coins 404, VF, weight 12.492 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 225o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 248 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings spread, open wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in exergue; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Click for a larger photo
Annona was worshipped in Rome as the goddess who prospered the year's supply of grain. She was represented on an altar in the capitol. The three principal granaries of Rome were Sicily, Egypt, and the African provinces. Annona civilis was the grain which purchased each year by the Roman state, then imported and put into storage, reserved and distributed for the subsistence of the people. Annona militaris was grain appropriated to the use of an army during a campaign.
RB65254. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 168a, Cohen 26, VF/F, grainy with some marks and encrustations, weight 15.635 g, maximum diameter 29.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 247 - 249 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ANNONA AVGG S C, Annona standing left, grain in right over modius at feet, cornucopia in left; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

Click for a larger photo
When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Legend says Babylas demanded he do penance for the murder of Gordian III before joining the celebration. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
SH70792. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 908, Prieur 368, Dura Coins 400, SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, weight 11.912 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOYC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail right, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S - C in exergue; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Click for a larger photo
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RS72380. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8918, RIC IV 27b, RSC IV 9, Hunter III 25, VF, nice portrait, well centered, struck with a worn reverse die, weight 4.165 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 245 - 247 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse AEQVITAS AVGG, Aequitas standing half left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; $85.00 SALE PRICE $76.50


Click for a larger photo
Nice gift for a lawyer or a judge. In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RS74152. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8918, RIC IV 27b, RSC IV 9, Hunter III 25, Choice VF, attractive highlighting toning, weight 3.150 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 247 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse AEQVITAS AVGG, Aequitas standing facing, head left, scales in right, cornucopia in left; $85.00 SALE PRICE $76.50


Click for a larger photo
In February 244, Gordian III was murdered by mutinous soldiers in Zaitha (Mesopotamia). Philip the Arab declared himself emperor and made a disgraceful peace with the Persians. He gave Shapur I 500,000 gold pieces and evacuated Syria.
RS72379. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8966, RIC IV 48b, RSC IV 215, Hunter III 14, VF, weight 3.977 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Feb 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SECVRIT ORBIS, Securitas seated left, scepter in right, propping head on left hand; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


Click for a larger photo
Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign, or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RB73628. Orichalcum sestertius, SRCV III 8986, Cohen V 6, Hunter III 87, RIC IV 165 (R) var (pacing right), F, weight 19.206 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 247 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ADVENTVS AVGG, emperor on horseback pacing left, raising right hand, scepter in left; ex True North Coins and Bullion (Colorado Springs, CO); rare; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


Click for a larger photo
This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RS73887. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 32b, RSC IV 55, Hunter III 7, SRCV III 8932, Choice aVF, well centered on a broad flan, weight 3.895 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse FIDES MILIT, Fides standing facing, head left, flanked by two standards, one in each hand; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


Click for a larger photo
This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RB73888. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 32b, RSC IV 55, Hunter III 7, SRCV III 8932, VF, very dark toning, well centered, scratches, weight 3.277 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse FIDES MILIT, Fides standing facing, head left, standard in each hand; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Deultum, Thrace

Click for a larger photo
Hermes was the messenger of the gods and the god of commerce and thieves. He was the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia. His symbols include the caduceus and winged sandals.
RP63221. Bronze AE 23, Draganov Deultum 1652 (O162/R329); Varbanov II 3004 (R3), F, weight 6.993 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL FL PA-C DEVLT, Mercury (Hermes) standing left, purse in right, caduceus in left; rare; $35.00 SALE PRICE $31.50


Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Viminacium, Moesia Superior

Click for a larger photo
Viminacium was a Roman Colony founded by Gordian III in 239 A.D. The usual legend is P.M.S. COL. VIM., abbreviating Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium. The usual type is a female personification of Moesia standing between a lion and a bull. The bull and the lion were symbols of the Legions VII and IV, which were quartered in the province.
RP71499. Bronze AE 28, H-J Viminacium 32 (R2); Varbanov I 138 (R3); AMNG I/I 105; BMC Thrace p. 17, 25, aF, well centered, rough, encrusted, weight 15.422 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 45o, Viminacium (near Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, 247 - 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M S COL VIM, Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands over bull on left standing right and lion on right standing left, AN VIIII (year 9 of the Viminacium colonial era) in exergue; $34.00 SALE PRICE $30.60


Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Deultum, Thrace

Click for a larger photo
Colonia Flavia Pacensis (or Pacifica) Deultum was founded by Vespasian. The colony assumed his family name, Flavia, and on account of Vespaian's devotion to the goddess of Peace (to whom he built a temple at Rome); it was called Pacensis (or Pacifica).
RP63011. Bronze AE 22, Draganov Deultum 1561 (O160/R219), Varbanov II 2291, Jurukova 463, F, weight 4.451 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL FL PA-C DEVLT, Apollo standing facing, head right, right hand raised above head, bow in right, resting right arm on column around which a snake is coiled, bow and quiver at feet on left; $30.00 SALE PRICE $27.00







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


OBVERSE LEGENDS

IMPCMIVLPHILLIPVSPFAVGPM
IMPCMIVLPHILIPPVSPFAVGPM
IMPIVLPHILIPPVSPIVSFELAVGPM
IMPMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
IMPPHILIPPVSAVG
MIVLPHILIPPVSAVG


REFERENCES

Caliců, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappťes sous l?Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H.B., E.A. Sydenham & C.H.V. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Macdonald, G. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the Hunterian Collection, University of Glascow, Vol III: Further Asia, Northern Africa, Western Europe. (Glasgow, 1905).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Seaby, H.A. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).

Catalog current as of Monday, July 27, 2015.
Page created in 1.654 seconds
Roman Coins of Philip I