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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>CrisisandDecline>PhilipI

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Marcus Julius Verus Philippus, known as Philip I "The Arab," was the Praetorian Prefect, and successor to Gordian III whom he possibly had murdered. After signing a treaty with the Persians, he returned home. During his reign the 1000th anniversary of the foundation of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated, and magnificent games were held on a scale rarely seen. In 249 A.D. a series of rebellions occurred, both Philip and his son were killed after their army was defeated near Verona by the forces of Trajan Decius.


Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Deultum, Thrace
Click for a larger photo Colonia Flavia Pacensis (or Pacifica) Deultum was founded by Vespasian. The colony assumed his family name, Flavia, and on account of Vespaian's devotion to the goddess of Peace (to whom he built a temple at Rome); it was called Pacensis (or Pacifica).
RP66050. Bronze AE 18, Draganov Deultum 1797 (O167/R656); Varbanov II 3043 (R5), aVF, nice patina, weight 2.327 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse PHILIPPVS IMP M IVL, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield; reverse C F / P D, dolphin swimming right; rare; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00

Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Legend says Babylas demanded he do penance for the murder of Gordian III before joining the celebration. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RP59309. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 977; BMC Galatia p. 215, 527, F, well centered, weight 14.385 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd issue; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩN, towered, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, ∆ - E / S - C across fields, ram leaping right with head turned back above, star below; big 31 mm bronze!; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00

Click for a larger photo In April 248, Philip combined celebration of Rome's 1000th anniversary with the Ludi Saeculares. Festivities included spectacular games and theatrical presentations. In the Colosseum, more than 1,000 gladiators were killed along with hundreds of exotic animals including hippos, leopards, lions, giraffes, and one rhinoceros. Lions undoubtedly participated in the celebratory events, in battles between animals and in the slaughter of condemned criminals.
RS90708. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8956, RIC IV 12, RSC IV 173, aVF, excellent centering, porous and grainy, weight 4.628 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SAECVLARES AVGG, lion walking right, I in exergue; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00

Click for a larger photo The curule chair was for senior magistrates including dictators, masters of the horse, consuls, praetors, censors, and the curule aediles. As a form of throne, it might be given as an honor to foreign kings recognized formally as friend (amicus) by the Roman people or senate. Designed for use by commanders in the field, the curule chair could be folded for easy transport. It had no back, low arms, curved legs forming an X, and was traditionally made of or veneered with ivory.
RS90727. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8943, RIC IV 2(b), RSC IV 120, VF, well centered, weight 4.380 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P II COS P P, Philip seated left on curule chair, togate, globe in right, short scepter in left; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo In 248, Trajan Decius put down the revolts of Pacatianus in Moesia and Iotapianus in Syria, by order of Emperor Philip. In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched them to Verona, where he defeated and killed Philip.
RP57153. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 922, Prieur 375, Dura Coins 404, VF, weight 12.492 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 225o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 248 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing right, head right, wings spread, open wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S C in exergue; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00

Click for a larger photo Annona was the goddess of harvest and her main attribute is grain.
RB65254. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 168a, Cohen 26, VF/F, grainy with some marks and encrustations, weight 15.635 g, maximum diameter 29.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 247 - 249 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ANNONA AVGG S C, Annona standing left, grain in right over modius at feet, cornucopia in left; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo Antioch was an important hub of early Christianity. The city had a large population of Jews and so attracted the earliest missionaries; including Peter, Barnabas, and also Paul during his first missionary journey. Antioch's converts were the first to be called Christians.

In 1999, Dr. Michael Molnar, a Christian astronomer, in "The Star of Bethlehem - The Legacy of the Magi" identified the most likely heavenly alignment constituting the Star of Bethlehem and asserted the Ram and Star on coins from Antioch represent the star of Bethlehem. See Star of Bethlehem in NumisWiki for an article by T. B. Cartwright, which identifies this type as a Star of Bethlehem 250th anniversary issue.
RP69863. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 1000; BMC Galatia p. 216, 535; SNG Cop 273, F, rough, weight 14.604 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 315o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 - end Sep 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOI CEB (CE&#88;&#69;&#66;&#60;&#47;EB counterclockwise below), confronted busts of Philip I, on left, laureate, draped and cuirassed; and Philip III, radiate, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩN, towered, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, ∆ - E / S - C across fields, ram leaping right with head turned back above, star below; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; scarce; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Legend says Babylas demanded he do penance for the murder of Gordian III before joining the celebration. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
RP69864. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 977; BMC Galatia p. 215, 527, F/VF, weight 12.175 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd issue; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩN, towered, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, ∆ - E / S - C across fields, ram leaping right with head turned back above, star below; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria
Click for a larger photo When Philip visited Antioch, Saint Babylas refused to let him enter the gathering of Christians at the Easter vigil (Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica, VI, 34). Legend says Babylas demanded he do penance for the murder of Gordian III before joining the celebration. Saint Babylas died in prison in 253 during the Decian persecution. He asked to be buried in his chains.
SH70792. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 908, Prieur 368, Dura Coins 400, SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, weight 11.912 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOYC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPC EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Γ, eagle standing facing on ground line, wings open, head and tail right, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA / S - C in ex; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Viminacium, Moesia Superior
Click for a larger photo Viminacium was a Roman Colony founded by Gordian III in 239 A.D. The usual legend is P.M.S. COL. VIM., abbreviating Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium. The usual type is a female personification of Moesia standing between a lion and a bull. The bull and the lion were symbols of the Legions VII and IV, which were quartered in the province.
RP65168. Bronze AE 30, H-J Viminacium 32 (R2); Varbanov I 138 (R3); AMNG I/I 105; BMC Thrace p. 17, 25, VF, weight 16.417 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 180o, Viminacium (near Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, 247 - 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M S COL VIM, Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands over bull on left standing right and lion on right standing left, AN VIIII in exergue; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50

Click for a larger photo Felicitas was the goddess or personification of good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire, and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS41865. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8950, RIC IV 78, RSC IV 155, VF, horn silver, tight crack, weight 3.315 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 249 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P VI COS P P, Felicitas standing left, long caduceus in right, cornucopia in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; rare; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00

Click for a larger photo Laetitia was a minor Roman goddess of gaiety, her name deriving from the root word laeta, meaning happy.
RS41832. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8935, RIC IV 36b, RSC IV 80, nice VF, weight 4.250 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse LAETIT FVNDAT, Laetitia standing left, wreath in right, rudder in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $45.00 SALE PRICE $40.50

Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Deultum, Thrace
Click for a larger photo Nemesis holds a lorum, a scarf similar to an ecclesiastical stole, worn as a badge by Roman magistrates to indicate authority to judge. The cubit rule she holds indicates she measures each man to determine their just fortune. The wheel of fate, which Nemesis controls, rests against her side.
RP63218. Bronze AE 23, Draganov Deultum 1695 (O151/R558); Varbanov II 3018 (R4); BMC Thrace p. 114, 25, F, weight 6.668 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL FL P-AC DEVLT, Nemesis standing facing, head left, cubit rule downward in right, lorum in left, wheel at her feet behind left; rare; $38.00 SALE PRICE $34.20

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia
Click for a larger photo Pisidia's geographic and strategic position made it difficult to maintain peace. To strengthen control, Rome colonized the area with military veterans, who were attracted to the area by the fertile soil. An important Roman colony, Antiocheia was, like Rome, divided into seven quarters called "vici" on seven hills. Paul visited Antiochia on his missionary journeys (Acts 13:14, 14:24). The formal language was Latin until the end of the 3rd century A.D.
RP69831. Bronze AE 27, Krzyzanowska VII/9, SNGvA 4970, SNG PfPS 105, SNG BnF 1272 var (legends), SNG Cop -, BMC Lycia -, F, rough, weight 10.116 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, Pisidia, Antiocheia mint, obverse IMP M IVL FILIPPVS P FEL A, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ANTHIOS, river-god Anthios reclining left, leaning on left arm resting on urn behind from which water flows, cornucopia in right hand, reeds in left, ANTIOCHI / COL; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $36.00 SALE PRICE $32.40

Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Deultum, Thrace
Click for a larger photo Hermes was the messenger of the gods and the god of commerce and thieves. He was the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia. His symbols include the caduceus and winged sandals.
RP63221. Bronze AE 23, Draganov Deultum 1652 (O162/R329); Varbanov II 3004 (R3), F, weight 6.993 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL FL PA-C DEVLT, Mercury (Hermes) standing left, purse in right, caduceus in left; rare; $35.00 SALE PRICE $31.50

Philip I, the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Deultum, Thrace
Click for a larger photo Colonia Flavia Pacensis (or Pacifica) Deultum was founded by Vespasian. The colony assumed his family name, Flavia, and on account of Vespaian's devotion to the goddess of Peace (to whom he built a temple at Rome); it was called Pacensis (or Pacifica).
RP63011. Bronze AE 22, Draganov Deultum 1561 (O160/R219), Varbanov II 2291, Jurukova 463, F, weight 4.451 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL FL PA-C DEVLT, Apollo standing facing, head right, right hand raised above head, bow in right, resting right arm on column around which a snake is coiled, bow and quiver at feet on left; $30.00 SALE PRICE $27.00


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Obverse legends:

IMPCMIVLPHILLIPVSPFAVGPM
IMPCMIVLPHILIPPVSPFAVGPM
IMPIVLPHILIPPVSPIVSFELAVGPM
IMPMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
IMPPHILIPPVSAVG
MIVLPHILIPPVSAVG



Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 26, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Philip I