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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Heros>Asklepios

Asklepios

Asclepius is the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, while his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, Agla, and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing, respectively.


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Cos, Islands of Caria
Click for a larger photo Asclepius is the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, while his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, Agla, and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing, respectively.
RP70539. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 2734; BMC Caria p. 216, 223; SNG Cop 696, Fair, weight 5.808 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Cos mint, c. 10 B.C. - c. 10 A.D.; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse KΩIΩN XAPMYΛOΣ B, laureate head of Asklepios right; $125.00 (93.75)

Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.
Click for a larger photo When the Pergamene king Attalus III died without an heir in 133 B.C., to prevent a civil war, he bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic.

The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
GB70878. Bronze AE 20, SNG BnF 1815 (with countermark); BMC Mysia p. 129, 158; SNGvA 1372; SNG Cop -, VF, nice green patina, weight 8.789 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Asklepios right; reverse AΣKΛHΠIOY / ΣΩTHPOΣ, Asklepian snake coiled around omphalos; countermark: owl standing right, head facing, in a round incuse; $125.00 (93.75)

Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.
Click for a larger photo The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RB63743. Bronze antoninianus, RIC V 258, BnF XII - (see XII.2 p. 389), aVF, weight 3.019 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, 1st emission, 271 A.D.; obverse IMP C D AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONSERVATOR AVG, Aesculapius standing facing, head left, holding staff entwined with snake, SERD in ex; scarce; $110.00 (82.50)

Caracalla and Julia Domna, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior
Click for a larger photo When Severus died in 211, Julia became the mediator between their two quarrelling sons, Caracalla and Geta, who were to rule as joint emperors. Caracalla convinced his mother to call Geta for a reconciliation meeting in her residence. It was a trick. In his mother's house, Caracalla's soldiers attacked and Geta died in their mother's arms. afterward, Julia's relationship with Caracalla was understandably difficult. Nevertheless, she accompanied him on his Parthian campaign in 217. During this trip, Caracalla was assassinated, after which Julia committed suicide. Her body was brought to Rome and she was later deified.
RP59371. Bronze pentassarion, H-J Marcianopolis 6.19.20.3 (R5), Varbanov I 1005, BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, F, weight 11.280 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, magistrate Quintilianus, 215 A.D.; obverse ANTΩNINOC AYΓOYCTOC IOYΛIA ∆OMNA, laureate bust of Caracalla right confronting draped bust of Julia Domna left; reverse YΠ KYNTIΛIANOY MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Asklepios standing facing, snake-entwined staff in right, E (mark of value) in left field; $90.00 (67.50)

Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.
Click for a larger photo When the Pergamene king Attalus III died without an heir in 133 B.C., to prevent a civil war, he bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic.

The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
GB90172. Bronze AE 23, SNG BnF 1803 ff.; BMC Mysia p. 129, 158; SNGvA 1372; SNG Cop -, aF, weight 8.095 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 315o, Pergamon mint, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Asklepios right; reverse AΣKΛHΠIOY / ΣΩTHPOΣ, Asklepian snake coiled around omphalos; ex Ancient Imports; $40.00 (30.00)


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Catalog current as of Monday, October 20, 2014.
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Asklepios