Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Please login or register to view your wish list! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Please login or register to view your wish list! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Heros ▸ AsklepiosView Options:  |  |  | 

Asklepios

Asclepius is the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, while his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, Agla, and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing, respectively.


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Asclepius, one of Apollo's sons, was the Greek god of medicine, sharing with Apollo the epithet Paean (the Healer). Pilgrims flocked to the Asclepieia, his healing temples, where the physicians and attendants were known as the Therapeutae. Ritual purification would be followed by offerings or sacrifices to the god, and the supplicant would then spend the night in the holiest part of the sanctuary, the abaton, where the non-venemous snakes slithered around freely on the floor. Any dreams or visions would be reported to a priest who would interpret the dreams and prescribe the appropriate therapy. The rod of Asclepius, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today.
GB76834. Bronze AE 17, BMC Mysia p. 128, 155, SNG BnF 1832 ff., SNGvA 1373; SGCV II 3968, VF, green patina, highlighting deposits, tight flan, weight 5.076 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, Roman rule, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Asklepios right; reverse AΣKΛHΠIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ (to Asklepios the Savior), snake-encircled Asklepian staff; $125.00 (110.00)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
When the Pergamene king Attalus III died without an heir in 133 B.C., to prevent a civil war, he bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic.

The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
GB71736. Bronze AE 19, SNG BnF 1815 (with owl countermark); SNG Tbingen 2415 (same); BMC Mysia p. 129, 161 (same); SNGvA -; SNG Cop -, F, green patina, small flan, obverse right side flattened by counter-marking, flan crack, weight 6.107 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 315o, Pergamon mint, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Asklepios right; reverse AΣKΛHΠIOY / ΣΩTHPOΣ, Asklepian snake coiled around omphalos, head right; countermark: owl standing right with head facing, in 6mm round punch; $120.00 (105.60)


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RB63743. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 2523, RIC V 258, BnF XII - (noted p. 389), Hunter IV -, Venra Hoard -, aVF, well centered on a ragged flan, flan cracks, weight 3.019 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, emission 1, phase 1, summer 271 A.D.; obverse IMP C D AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONSERVATOR AVG, Aesculapius standing facing, head left, leaning on staff entwined with snake in right hand, SERD in exergue; scarce; $85.00 (74.80)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
When the Pergamene king Attalus III died without an heir in 133 B.C., to prevent a civil war, he bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic.

The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RS77041. Bronze AE 19, SNG BnF 1803 ff.; BMC Mysia p. 129, 158; SNGvA 1372; SNG Cop -, F, tight flan, weight 7.506 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Asklepios right; reverse AΣKΛHΠIOY / ΣΩTHPOΣ, Asklepian snake coiled around omphalos, erect head right, holding fillet(?) in mouth; $75.00 (66.00)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Asclepius, one of Apollo's sons, was the Greek god of medicine, sharing with Apollo the epithet Paean (the Healer). Pilgrims flocked to the Asclepieia, his healing temples, where the physicians and attendants were known as the Therapeutae. Ritual purification would be followed by offerings or sacrifices to the god, and the supplicant would then spend the night in the holiest part of the sanctuary, the abaton, where the non-venemous snakes slithered around freely on the dormitory floor. Any dreams or visions would be reported to a priest who would interpret the dreams and prescribe the appropriate therapy. The rod of Asclepius, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today.
GB76843. Bronze AE 16, BMC Mysia p. 128, 155, SNG BnF 1832 ff., SNGvA 1373; SGCV II 3968, VF, reverse strike a bit soft, weight 3.740 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, Pergamon mint, Roman rule, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Asklepios right; reverse AΣKΛHΠIOY / ΣΩTHPOΣ (to Asklepios the Savior), snake-entwined Asklepian staff; ex Tom Vossen; $50.00 (44.00)


Macrinus and Diadumenian, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

Click for a larger photo
Asklepios was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis. Apollo killed his mother for being unfaithful, but rescued the unborn Asklepios from her womb. Apollo carried the baby to the centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the art of medicine. In return for some kindness, a snake taught him secret knowledge of healing. Asclepius became so proficient as a healer that he surpassed both Chiron and his father, Apollo. Asclepius was even able to evade death and to bring the dead back to life. Zeus killed him to restore balance to the human population, but later resurrected Asclepios as a god to prevent a feud with Apollo. Zeus instructed Asclepios to never revive the dead without his approval.
RP76506. Bronze pentassarion, H-J Marcianopolis 6.24.20.1 (R5), Varbanov I 1257 (R3), AMNG I/I 745, BMC Thrace p. 32, 32 var. (obv. legend), Moushmov 535, gF, nice green patina, slightly off center on tight flan, centration dimples, weight 12.378 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 45o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, magistrate Pontianus, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse AYTK OΠEΛ CEY MAKΠEINOC K M OΠEΛ ANTΩNEINO,C (final C in center below busts), laureate head of Macrinus right confronting bare head of Diadumenian left; reverse YΠ ΠONTIANOY MAPKIANOΠ,OΛEITΩN (ending in exergue), Asklepios standing facing, head left, wearing himation, snake entwined staff in right hand, left hand on hip, E (mark of value) upper right; ex Ancient Imports, ex Colosseum Coin Exchange; $40.00 (35.20)







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Saturday, February 13, 2016.
Page created in 1.029 seconds
Asklepios