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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Medieval, Islamic and Crusader Coins (Moderators: AlexB, quadrans)  |  Topic: Hand of God Pfennig 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Hand of God Pfennig  (Read 506 times)
Joe Sermarini
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« on: May 08, 2020, 05:12:06 am »


0.542g, 17.8mm
Obv: Hand of God
Rev: Cross with bifurcated ends, pellet at each end

I have found several very different attributions for this type in auctions, including Brandenburg, Frankonia, c. 1100 (Schmaltz-Koenig 357) and Grafschaft, 1370 - 1380.  Anyone know the correct attribution?  


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shanxi
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« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2020, 05:44:44 am »

Without mint mark (in the center of the hand) it is as far as I know not possible to be sure about the mint:

This seller writes something about the history:

https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=6511314

Older examples are heavier than newer examples. The absence of a circular legend and the "Quadratum supercusum" indicates that it is not a very early example.
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Stkp
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« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2020, 06:13:53 am »

Shanxi's link sums it up well. I have one of these in my gallery (not as nice as the subject of this post). This is what I wrote about it:

Since they were first struck at Hall in Swabia, these coins became known as "hellers" (or as handhellers, due to the devise on the obverse). They were struck in large quantities but of a poor quality, and circulated widely, quickly driving all other small coins out of circulation. The name "heller" became associated with coins of the same type struck in other cities, and by extension, to coins of low grade billon throughout Germany.

The obverse devise also appears on the coat-of-arms of Hall, and it is not clear whether or not the coin preceded the coat-of-arms. The word "handel" means trade or commerce in German, and the hand may be a pun.

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« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2020, 06:32:14 am »

P.S.: I refer to my example as being from Schwäbisch Hall (Württemberg), albeit with an explanation that such was merely the originating city and that they were minted elsewhere as well. I referenced it to Saurma 1365/608, DeWitt 2491, Torongo 1.5.
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« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2020, 06:46:11 am »

I just added weight and diameter to my first post, 0.542g, 17.8mm. Sorry I forgot to included it before.

I just found another of the type in my consignments in process (no photo yet). 

Thanks Ralf and Stkp!


 
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Joseph Sermarini
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2020, 06:53:53 am »

Here it is for sale in...

The FORVM Shop
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« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2020, 06:51:31 pm »

Joe,

I had not heard of the quadratum supercusum or its significance before. It is very interesting. I did some research and found information about it on an old Forum post. A guest named AvP wrote:

In Bavaria - the capital in the Middle Ages was Regensburg - existed about 1250 AD a very special minting technique. The silver blank (Schrötling) was not round, but angular shaped! In so doing it was easier to produce the Schrötling and furthermore no scrap was coming up. The disadvantage of this "technique" lies in the fact that after minting the angular shaped form does not vanish. Therefore the surface of the Schrötling was hammered more or less round (by exactly four strokes). This partially reduction of thickness gave rise to the so-called Quadratum supercusum, the only part with the original thickness. The product was called Vierschlagpfennig.

https://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=100635.0

These facts were discussed as well in a number of German-language coin blogs that I translated.

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« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2020, 06:53:31 am »

I found something similar in German but far less clear from my own translation.  Thanks.  I am going to make a NumisWiki page(s).
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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Medieval, Islamic and Crusader Coins (Moderators: AlexB, quadrans)  |  Topic: Hand of God Pfennig « previous next »
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