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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Ancient Coin Forum (Moderator: Dr. Danny S. Jones)  |  Topic: To Use or Not to Use Ren Wax... 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: To Use or Not to Use Ren Wax...  (Read 11661 times)
renegade3220
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« on: March 11, 2010, 04:10:20 pm »

Ok, this might have been asked before, but I didn't find it.  I have noticed that a lot of people talk about putting Ren Wax on their cleaned coins.  The idea makes sense.  Keep out the oxygen, keep the coin looking good after cleaning.

My problem with it is, that sooooo many people seem to be doing it, but there are also a lot of sources that say, although it doesn't hurt the coin, it actually will detract from its value if you put if up for sale.  They say it declines the value of the coin and is not necessarily desirable by collectors.

Now I know everyone has their own opinion on the subject, but I would like to hear from actual collectors.  I know putting Ren Wax on a coin helps the coin, and makes it look good, but does it actually detract from the value of the coin, etc?

If it does, then why do so many people use it, when so many things advise against it for collecting and selling purposes.

I would really love some insight.  I am struggling with my decision to use this stuff or not, when my very first batch of coins comes out of the darkness of 2k years of dirt and into the light of the 21st century!
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Lloyd Taylor
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« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2010, 04:55:25 pm »

I cannot see how it would detract from value when it does no harm to the coin and it is readily removed with an organic solvent with no ill effect to the coin.  Such being the case it comes down to a matter of personal taste.  I have used it on bronze coins to seal them from humid atmospheric conditions and thus reduce the risk of bronze disease. I understand that many museums similarly use it on bronze artifacts for surface protection, so it cannot be all bad, as some might suggest. I haven't used it on silver as I prefer a toned appearance, but to each his own.
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renegade3220
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« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2010, 07:33:41 pm »

Thanks. Any other knowledgable opinions? The more the merrier...
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Dr. Danny S. Jones
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« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2010, 07:37:32 pm »

If the coin has any traces of bronze disease, the wax can actually seal IN the problem. Renwax is great, just make sure that you aren't waxing coins with a BD problem.

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Danny
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Gavignano
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« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2010, 07:39:02 pm »

Agree. You might want to check out the board about storage and preservation too - there are quite a few threads about waxing or renwax. You can use the search function to find the threads.
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rasiel
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2010, 03:14:09 am »

and it's nearly useless on silver and gold! in fact, on gold it's 100% useless. i agree on bronzes in most cases (asides from trapping bd) no harm no foul.

ras
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moonmoth
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2010, 07:20:25 am »

I would say, it depends on the coin and on what you want from it.

Some coins have a very matte appearance which would be changed considerably by waxing.  The most obvious example is coins with a "sand patina." It is generally agreed that these are not suitable for waxing.

In fact, any coin is made shinier by waxing.  This can make it very hard to get a decent photograph, so if you want to wax your coins, photograph them first.

I don't wax my coins, but if I lived in a hot and humid climate, I might.

Bill
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« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2010, 11:10:07 am »

I live in Houston and it is very hot a humid. I use renwax mostly on bronze coins, especially those that have had problems I had to deal with in the past like BD. I also wax my Iron notgeld. Smiley
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romeo
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« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2010, 11:38:41 am »

Coins that i have had to clean myself quite ofter come out quite dull and lifeless, the renwax is used by me to boost the life back into the coin, quite often with amazing results, that with the other protective benifits makes it seem to me a good thing to do, but i know other people, if they receive a coin that has been waxed will actually get the wax off. I dont understand this, but each to his own. If its good enough for a museum, its good enough for me. I would never think a waxed coin would fetch less of a price though, probably the oposite because it looks better!
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areich
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« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2010, 11:42:15 am »

If its good enough for a museum, its good enough for me.

What do you mean by that?
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romeo
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« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2010, 11:49:09 am »

i mean if its good enough for a museum to use renwax then its good enough for me. Nothing criptic.
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Rich Beale
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« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2010, 12:57:21 pm »

Which museum? The BM does use ren-wax, but not on its coins, and nor would I. I dislike the stuff - it obscures fine detail, makes photography more difficult, attracts dust and can sometimes be difficult to remove because of the polyethylene wax.
At the end of the day, it is a foreign substance on the surface of the coin. Would you lacquer your coins, or varnish them even? Both have been 'acceptable' in the past. If you are worried about humidity then you should consider appropriate storage instead of smothering your coins in petroleum derivatives.
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areich
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« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2010, 01:13:53 pm »

I set 'em up and you knock 'em down?  Angry
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Rich Beale
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« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2010, 01:24:04 pm »

Smiley

Some might call that teamwork!
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DruMAX
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« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2010, 01:25:06 pm »

well, you can hardly find a coin these days without some form of foriegn substance on them be it renwax, artificial toning or patina (which I hate), etc...I store my coins in flips, best I can do. I have waxed most of my iron notgeld and some bronze coins. With a light application is does not obscure any detail nor does it collect dust, nor does it put too much of a shine to hinder photgraphing the coin, nor do I believe it harms the coin...I would not lacquer or varnish a coin but that is not the same as renwax. personal opinion from experience using it.
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Enodia
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« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2010, 01:44:17 pm »

in some cases it may be a necessary evil i guess, but i really don't like the look or feel of waxed coins.
i solve the problem of BD by buying very few bronze coins, and being very picky about the ones i do buy. i've only had two coins that needed treatment and they both looked like crap afterwards, so preserving that look is not something i'm interested in.

~ Peter
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areich
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« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2010, 01:59:07 pm »

My coins don't get BD. The ones that suffer from it had it before. I've had one or two scares in the beginning when I was almost ready to give up (better than collecting denarii!) but that passed. I never see BD on my coins and I wouldn't keep a bought coin that had it, even if the coin may be interesting. It's better for my peace of mind.
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romeo
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« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2010, 02:03:42 pm »

actually the BM does use wax on some of their display coins so thats incorrect and so too i believe the rest of your observations, but i suppose its a matter of opinion not fact.
Which museum? The BM does use ren-wax, but not on its coins, and nor would I. I dislike the stuff - it obscures fine detail, makes photography more difficult, attracts dust and can sometimes be difficult to remove because of the polyethylene wax.
At the end of the day, it is a foreign substance on the surface of the coin. Would you lacquer your coins, or varnish them even? Both have been 'acceptable' in the past. If you are worried about humidity then you should consider appropriate storage instead of smothering your coins in petroleum derivatives.
well, you can hardly find a coin these days without some form of foriegn substance on them be it renwax, artificial toning or patina (which I hate), etc...I store my coins in flips, best I can do. I have waxed most of my iron notgeld and some bronze coins. With a light application is does not obscure any detail nor does it collect dust, nor does it put too much of a shine to hinder photgraphing the coin, nor do I believe it harms the coin...I would not lacquer or varnish a coin but that is not the same as renwax. personal opinion from experience using it.
I agree but it seems there is a conflict of opinion!
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Enodia
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« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2010, 02:06:57 pm »

... I was almost ready to give up (better than collecting denarii!) but that passed.

why are people so prejudiced against denarii? is it the size?
i hear this a lot, but i think they are lovely coins as a whole, and even when worn they look so much better than delapidated bronzes.
to each their own i guess.

~ Peter
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areich
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« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2010, 02:11:34 pm »

I find them boring.

Romeo, how do you know the BM uses Renwax? It says so on the tin but according to Curtis that's a myth.
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romeo
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« Reply #20 on: March 12, 2010, 02:13:54 pm »

because i asked them!
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areich
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« Reply #21 on: March 12, 2010, 02:26:13 pm »

Who told you that?
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romeo
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« Reply #22 on: March 12, 2010, 02:46:09 pm »

The girl selling real busts of Cleopatra in the BM shop  Roll Eyes
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mwilson603
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« Reply #23 on: March 12, 2010, 02:54:41 pm »

I've used Renwax on some bronze coins and found that a) it can actually enhance visible detail on more worn coins, b) on coins with a rougher surface I think it can greatly enhances the look of the coin and c) on some coins where the patina is very soft, e.g. lighter green patina, it can help to ensure that the patina does not rub/flake/chip off.
So in short, and drawing also from another thread where Rich has voiced HIS opinion on Renwax, "In any case, please, please, please don't go and coat your silver in ren-wax. It is unsightly and makes the coin inherently less desirable until it is removed." , I do agree with Rich with regards to silver coins but I disagree with him that Renwax should not be used at all.
regards
Mark
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renegade3220
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« Reply #24 on: March 12, 2010, 03:42:28 pm »

So it appears to still be a toss up, and really a personal preference.  It seems that the monetary value of a coin is neither enhanced or decreased from using Renwax.  Is this in agreement?  If so, then it can't hurt either way.

With that said, is there a way to dry the coins after cleaning that will, of course remove ALL the water, but also not make them looks darker and dry?  Maybe something like a low long heat vs. a fast high heat, etc.

Or maybe is the hairdryer method better than the oven method?  Or use a toaster oven, etc.?

If there is a good water removal method that doesn't leave coins lacking luster or looking dry etc. I would like to know, because that could ovbviously stop the need or desire to use RenWax to bring a coing "back to life."

I would love to hear if there are such said methods...
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