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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Ancient Coin Forum (Moderator: goldenancients)  |  Topic: Anybody digg ancient coins? 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Anybody digg ancient coins?  (Read 68498 times)
Ardatirion
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« Reply #150 on: May 02, 2007, 09:32:07 am »

Cibalia - if it is an archaeological dig, it would have been thoroughly examined as the dirt was removed. As such, its unlikely that you'll find any coins or interesting things there. At a well-funded, important dig, every meter of that dirt would be sifted to find things as miniscule as plant seeds. But likely, as this was a rescue case, they just didn't have anywhere to put all the tiny potsherds and whatnot that they found. It happens more often than you'd think.

So hey, go ahead and have a blast going through the already moved dirt - it won't hurt anything. By the way, if you find anything, tell me so I can make fun of the archaeologists who conducted the dig. Grin
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oldcoinz
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« Reply #151 on: May 02, 2007, 10:50:14 am »

if it is an archaeological dig, it would have been thoroughly examined as the dirt was removed.

That is not always the case. If the dig is in a cultivated field there will be a plow zone. I was in a class where the professor told us about using a backhoe to remove the plow zone.
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Ardatirion
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« Reply #152 on: May 02, 2007, 01:33:10 pm »

True, true. But the context would already have been disturbed on that. That doesn't mean there isn't interesting material in it.... I hope Cibalia finds some nice stuff.
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Cibalia
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« Reply #153 on: May 02, 2007, 02:39:45 pm »

Cibalia - if it is an archaeological dig, it would have been thoroughly examined as the dirt was removed. As such, its unlikely that you'll find any coins or interesting things there. At a well-funded, important dig, every meter of that dirt would be sifted to find things as miniscule as plant seeds. But likely, as this was a rescue case, they just didn't have anywhere to put all the tiny potsherds and whatnot that they found. It happens more often than you'd think.

So hey, go ahead and have a blast going through the already moved dirt - it won't hurt anything. By the way, if you find anything, tell me so I can make fun of the archaeologists who conducted the dig. Grin
You presume too much. You weren't there so can't say. I have worked 13 years with the local museum, I am experienced and know when something is lacking. If I say the soil isn't examined, it isn't examined! The lack of staff and time was against the museum. Their sytem is that all holes are dug by hand, and usually the wheel barrows have their dirt poked around a bit by students. This time that didn't happen.
I have found nine truckloads of soil from this dig. The first produced two Gallienus coins, the second and third a Claudius Gothicus coin and a ring, plus bits of copper. A half hour's work. There will be more
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Ardatirion
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« Reply #154 on: May 02, 2007, 03:30:04 pm »

Ok, then it isn't a very good archaeologial dig. Lol.  Grin Best of luck with your finds.
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Robert_Brenchley
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« Reply #155 on: May 02, 2007, 04:16:05 pm »

It's common for archaeologists to take the top layer off by mechanical means and just ignore it, if they want to dig the deeper layers. Unfortunately, they tend to have decidedly limited time and money available.
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« Reply #156 on: May 02, 2007, 04:39:40 pm »

Ok, then it isn't a very good archaeological dig. Lol.

Not true. Here in Britain, when a site has had the upper layers of soil disturbed by cultivation over the last 100 years or so very often the upper layers of "plough soil" are removed by "the big yellow trowel" i.e. a JCB mechanical digger. The operators of these machines can work to very tight tolerances and are under the scrutiny of on site archaeologists. The spoil heaps from the machine are generally worked over by metal detectors and may even be visually inspected but are certainly not sifted for plant seeds. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this practice.
Once a level is reached below this disturbed layer, or visible archaeology is evident, it is an entirely different story and each inch of soil will indeed be painstakingly excavated and sifted.
The archaeological techniques used would, of course, depend on the particular site undergoing investigation.

Alex.

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Cibalia
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« Reply #157 on: May 02, 2007, 11:42:17 pm »

Alex is right, but that is how it would work in a perfect situation. Around here, there is so much rebuilding after the war that the museum has a schedule of rescue digs. this means that all they can do is make sure that the excavations are done by hand, ie men with spades and shovels. They used to post someone at each wheelbarrow on smaller digs but smaller items were still lost. This recent one had ten holes for the foundation pillars and four guys digging in each, with only one archaeologist to watch, with a student. there is no way they can inspect the soil and artefact recovery wasn't their priority, just recording any walls, pits etc.
 Now, the museum don't want me to go scrabbling around in the soil for artefacts, even though I would pass them on to the museum. Why?
Because it would like like they haven't done their jobs correctly, which they haven't, but it's not their fault.
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Marcus Aurelius
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« Reply #158 on: May 10, 2007, 03:06:35 pm »

Hello
I hunt today after long time,and i found this Republic denar.Wowww it is about 2050 years old coin.This is why i love this coin hunting so much. Cool
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus. Denarius circa 42, AR 3.73 g. Laureate head of Apollo r.; behind, lyre. P.CLODIVS – ·M·F Diana standing facing, with bow and quiver over shoulder, holding lighted torch in each hand.
Regards
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jonkag7
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« Reply #159 on: May 10, 2007, 04:33:30 pm »

I can't even imagine how amazing that must feel! (I know, youve heard it a thousand times, but still!) Very nice Republican denarius! Continued good luck hunting!

Jonathan
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zzancientcoins
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« Reply #160 on: May 10, 2007, 05:13:19 pm »

Hi,

I don't dig myself because it is illegal here to dig (Israel), but it
is a day-dream of mine to be out in the Israel outback (for lack of
a better word) and stumble upon an ancient horde of very rare
coins (i.e. each worth 50k USD +) and keep some for my personal
collection, and sell others to others for their collection.

Kindest regards,

B> Leon
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« Reply #161 on: May 10, 2007, 10:07:54 pm »

Well, if you were to find a hoard with multiples of a rare and expensive coin, the price of the individual coins will be reduced sharply.  But not to worry, since it's all hypothetical.   Cool
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Georgi
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« Reply #162 on: May 11, 2007, 07:15:16 pm »

Well, hypothetical, but with much greater chances of success than winning a lottery.
In Britian, and most any other country that was once under the rule of, or influenced by the Roman Empire, there are, without doubt, and I think even the experts here will back me up, easily found (with or without metal dectors) hoards that contain thousands of roman coins of every denomination, metal type, and time of mintage. The trick is stumbling across,  or informed guessing, or hours of research that  will in the future uncover some of these hoards.  Only a small minority have been found hard as that is to believe. 
What always comes to mind when I think on this is Mr. Clays story of on Cyprus, I believe, where a workman found numerous  jars or amphorae  of "ancient medallions" while his employer or boss or the landowner was absent and tried to sell the lot for the equivalent of $100.  Finding no takers, he then went to the local foundry and sold them for a pittance to be melted down.  The landowner returned and managed to rescue 1400 or so out of a possible 14,000 coins.
I always encourage Marcus with this thought.  There's gold somewhere in that black Serbian soil!
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Scipio Helveticus
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« Reply #163 on: May 12, 2007, 02:36:12 am »

What always comes to mind when I think on this is Mr. Clays story of on Cyprus, I believe, where a workman found numerous  jars or amphorae  of "ancient medallions" while his employer or boss or the landowner was absent and tried to sell the lot for the equivalent of $100.  Finding no takers, he then went to the local foundry and sold them for a pittance to be melted down.  The landowner returned and managed to rescue 1400 or so out of a possible 14,000 coins.


Bruce, that is a warped version of the real incident, which occured in my country of residence in MALTA. The amphorae were discovered by a labourer near Casal Zurrieka (nowadays the southern fishing village of Zurrieq.), in the early 19th century. Indeed, since he was a peasant who had actually lived under the the brief rule of Napoleon and the subsequent British rule, it is fair to assume that he did not recieve a classical education!! He therefore sold them to a  brass founder in Valletta where an aide to the British governer of malta managed to rescue what was left of the hoard.

When I return to the island, I will attempt to locate the exact position where the hoard was found. Zurrieq has a population of 10,000. Someone is bound to know!!
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basemetal
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« Reply #164 on: May 12, 2007, 06:24:33 pm »

Thanks Scipio for setting the record straight!
I was working from memory only which even at the tender age of 53 is somewhat like a collander these days!
One interesting part of the story that I do remember is that the coins were called "medallions" which gives an intriqueing insight as to how large ancient coins were viewed at later times.
LOL...be sure and look around some other areas besides!
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Scipio Helveticus
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« Reply #165 on: May 13, 2007, 10:14:19 am »

 Grin No problem Bruce!! Will do. I can already visualize myself explaining to Farmer Joe with my copy of Treasure Hunting magazine and detector in hand why I want to trample all over his newley ploughed soil! Should be interesting! :-)
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Marcus Aurelius
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« Reply #166 on: July 07, 2007, 03:58:33 am »

Hello again
I did not hunt past few months,but now wheat harvest is ended,and farmers started to plow.Also i am armed with new DFX machine  Cool and i expect more finds this year.For start,this is few coins and one dove fibula found in one "beaten"cabbage field.
Best Regards
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Scipio Helveticus
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« Reply #167 on: July 07, 2007, 04:11:20 am »

Quote from: Marcus A on July 07, 2007, 03:58:33 am
Hello again
I did not hunt past few months,but now wheat harvest is ended,and farmers started to plow.Also i am armed with new DFX machine  Cool and i expect more finds this year.For start,this is few coins and one dove fibula found in one "beaten"cabbage field.
Best Regards


Marcus, question. How do you get farmers permission to detect on his soil. The locals farmers I ask always seem to look at me suspiciously and turn me away!

Nice finds btw.
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His Star
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« Reply #168 on: July 07, 2007, 08:05:16 am »

Quote from: Marcus A on July 07, 2007, 03:58:33 am
Hello again
I did not hunt past few months,but now wheat harvest is ended,and farmers started to plow.Also i am armed with new DFX machine  Cool and i expect more finds this year.For start,this is few coins and one dove fibula found in one "beaten"cabbage field.
Best Regards


Oh!  The dove is wonderful!  Good for you!
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danikshin
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« Reply #169 on: July 07, 2007, 01:13:13 pm »

wow there must still be tons of coins yet to be found.
i was wonderin though , if it is illiegal to dig up coins in most of the countries in europe, then why can people still buy thousands of uncleaned coins at a time.....its confusing
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scardan123
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« Reply #170 on: July 07, 2007, 02:36:31 pm »

well, on one hand many uncleaned coins are replicas or not-so-ancient coins which are sold as "roman" or "greek". On the other hand also killing people is illegal in many countries, yet thousands of people are murdered every year around the world. That is to say, unfortunately an action prohibited by the State can still be performed... and sometimes at a low risk of being caught, especially the looting of archeological sites in certain areas  Sad
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danikshin
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« Reply #171 on: July 07, 2007, 02:46:44 pm »

your right.......but why dont the state just make it legal to dig coins....they're not  tryin to dig them and they dont let anybody else dig them so the the coins just rot, what a waste......thats greedy from thier side 
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DruMAX
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« Reply #172 on: July 07, 2007, 03:20:28 pm »

yeah, most coins found in digs will be put away in a store room never to be seen again...

I like the dove...Smiley I hope you post when you get them cleaned.
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danikshin
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« Reply #173 on: July 07, 2007, 03:29:48 pm »

i got a question for Marcus A:
when u go searching for coins,do u find some every time or is it sometimes

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Marcus Aurelius
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« Reply #174 on: July 07, 2007, 11:49:10 pm »

Well i find about 10 - 40 coins per every hunt in fall and winter season.Now i am limited to search on harvested wheat fields.But real hunt will start when corn and sugar beat harvest start.
I told this before and i don`t want to go back to that subject-For 10 years coin hunting,nobody told me bad word here about hunting coins.I hunt only in fields around my town,and farmers know me and they let me hunt.Also i backfill every single hole i dug!Do you know how many broken coins and fibulas i find during the year?Tractors and chemicals destroy it Sad
Here is one ruin lead Roman Icon that i found recently.What a pity  Huh i will never know how this Icon look like.
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