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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Coin of the Day (Moderator: LordBest)  |  Topic: Crocodile Dundee does campgates (with portcullis) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Crocodile Dundee does campgates (with portcullis)  (Read 682 times)
Congius
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« on: February 05, 2006, 04:28:40 pm »

"That's not a campgate, THIS is a campgate..." Grin

This is RIC VI Cyzicus 39, issued only from Cyzicus c.308 by Maximinus II for himself and Galerius. It's not obvious exactly what the occasion was for briefly issuing this tetrarchic type - not issued from any of the other mints of Galerius & Daia. It might have been political maneuvering by Daia related to the deteriorating tetrarchy (Constantine & Maxentius's power grabs) and the negotiations that lead to the conference at Carnuntum in 308.

One neat detail of this type, overlooked by the RIC description, is the portcullis, which doesn't show up on any other campagate type. In Googling for "Roman portcullis" to verify that is what it likely is, I found this reference in Appian's "History of Rome" to their use by the Roman's already by 208 BC.

http://www.livius.org/ap-ark/appian/appian_hannibal_11.html (2nd paragraph)

Ben
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ecoli
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Every coin is sacred, every coin is great.


« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2006, 04:43:32 pm »

Now what is that safe combination again?  Grin

Great coin!
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Congius
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« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2006, 06:54:26 am »

You're coming for my coins?! Shocked

OK, better sharpen those spikes.... I'll be ready!

Ben
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Frans Diederik
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carpe diem, vita brevis est!


« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2006, 08:35:07 am »

"Gruesome gates get greater and greater" were the headlines in the Cyzikan Journal in 208. Whether there was an opening of the new gate or a 'shutting' , the journal doesn't say....
Great coin, which also is of great value to the collectors of architectural coins!!

Frans
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ecoli
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Every coin is sacred, every coin is great.


« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2006, 01:22:55 pm »

You're coming for my coins?! Shocked

OK, better sharpen those spikes.... I'll be ready!

Ben


Spikes...gee I was only prepared for flying cows and taunting Frenchmen Wink
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Varangian
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Det er ikke å unngå fare det vi har komme!


« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2006, 12:24:53 am »


Spikes...gee I was only prepared for flying cows and taunting Frenchmen Wink

I'd rather face the spikes.... Grin
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Steve Minnoch
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« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2006, 05:46:36 pm »

This is part of Appian's account (Book IV of Civil Wars) of the siege of Xanthus undertaken by Brutus:

78 Soon afterwards the remainder made a fresh sally about midday, and as the besiegers withdrew again, they set fire to all the machines. As the gates were left open for them on account of the former calamity, about 2000 Romans broke in with them. While others were pushing in at the entrance the portcullis suddenly fell upon them, either by the design of the Xanthians or the accidental breaking of the ropes, so that some of the Romans who were forcing their way in were crushed and the others found their retreat cut off, as they could not raise the portcullis without hoisting apparatus. Pelted by missiles hurled upon them by the Xanthians from the roofs in the narrow streets, they forced their way with difficulty till they came to the forum, which was near by, and there they overcame the forces which were at close quarters with them, but, being under heavy volleys of arrows and having themselves neither bows nor javelins, they took refuge by the temple of Sarpedon to avoid being surrounded. The Romans who were outside the walls were excited and anxious for those inside, and tried every expedient, Brutus meantime darting hither and thither, but they were not able to break the portcullis, which was protected with iron, nor could they procure ladders or towers since their own had been burned. Nevertheless some of them made extemporized ladders, and others pushed trunks of trees against the walls and climbed up as if by ladders. Still others fastened iron hooks to ropes and hurled them up to the walls, and whenever one of them caught fast they climbed up.

79 The Oenandians, who were neighbours of the Xanthians, and who had formed an alliance with Brutus because of their enmity to the latter, clambered up by way of the crags. When the Romans saw them they toiled up after them. Many fell off, but some scaled the wall and opened a small gate, defended with a very dense palisade, and admitted the most daring of the assailants, who swung themselves over the palings. Being now more numerous they began to hack at the portcullis, which was not protected with iron on the inside, while others joined in hacking it from outside, to help them. While the Xanthians, with loud cries, were rushing upon the Romans who were at the temple of Sarpedon, the Romans within and without, who were demolishing the portcullis, fearful for their comrades, struggled with frantic zeal. Finally they broke it down and rushed through in crowds about sunset, with a loud shout intended as a signal to those in the temple.

Steve
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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Coin of the Day (Moderator: LordBest)  |  Topic: Crocodile Dundee does campgates (with portcullis) « previous next »
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