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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Coin of the Day (Moderator: LordBest)  |  Topic: Constantine- The Magnificent Coin 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Constantine- The Magnificent Coin  (Read 1217 times)
wolfgang336
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« on: December 01, 2005, 10:44:38 pm »

I present for your inspection this very rare example of a type issued for the transfer of mints from Ostia to Arles in the year 313 (there exists a dated example).

[IMP] CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, bust left, cuir., laureate, shield over left shoulder, spear over right

PROVIDE-NT-IAE AVGG, female figure (possibly Moneta) on prow, holding cornucopia, facing what must be the personification of Arles, who is holding a standard (Ben informs me that this may be a symbol of Constantine's Italian victory).

QARL in exergue

3.57g, 21.4mm
RIC Arles 30var.

This particular issue is not listed with this particular obverse type, however I am aware of one other in existance. The symbolism of this type and it's partner, VTILITAS PVBLICA, simply blows me away. On the VTILITAS issue, Moneta is on prow also, but facing away from the figure (probably the personification of Ostia) on the shore, as if departing. On the Providentiae issue, Moneta is depicted as arriving at Arles. An interesting oddity of my example however: On most of these coins, the figure on shore is not wearing a turreted headress, while on mine, she is.

I will attempt a better scan when I have the chance, in the meantime, this one will have to suffice. Please comment!

Evan
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Jochen
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« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2005, 08:34:46 am »

I'm speechless! What a magnificent coin! And what historical relevance!

Congrats!
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« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2005, 09:11:51 am »

Hi Evan,

It's a great coin - I'm jealous!

I'm not sure what the standard is that the receiving figure on shore is holding, but the figure certainly seems to be a personification of the city of Arles due to the tyche-like turreted headgear.

Regarding Constantine's Italian victory, I was actually referring to the companion VTILITAS PVBLICA departure coin, where the figure on shore seeing moneta (? - with scales) off from Ostia is a soldier holding victory on globe.

Ben
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wolfgang336
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« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2005, 03:32:04 pm »

Ah, alright, thanks Ben, I've noted that now.

Does anybody happen to know what VTILITAS PVBLICA translates to?

Evan
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vic9128
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« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2005, 03:37:30 pm »

I have a page of translations

http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/vocab/vocab.html

VTILITAS PVBLICA- Public utility (common good).
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wolfgang336
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« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2005, 09:48:49 pm »

New scan! Also, is the motivation for the move known? "For the Public Good", and "Forsight of the Emperors" seems to me as though something was happening at Ostia.

Evan
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« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2005, 05:53:26 am »

I havn't read any theories on the Ostia-Arles transfer, but I assume it was a matter of mint distribution. Having mints at both Ostia and Rome (side by side) seems rather redundant, but Arles would be able to serve both Viennesis (southern France) as well as Hispaniae (Spain).  Having a mint at Arles would also compensate for closing the mint at Aquileia which was in a poor defensive position on the border with Licinius (and reopened as soon as the adjacent province of Pannoniae beacame Constantine's in 317).

Ben
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Commodo73
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« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2005, 08:53:59 am »

is a really magnificent coin !               
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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2006, 02:23:50 pm »

Evan,
     How do you find your coin differs from RIC 30?  I wanted to note it in my copy, but at first glance it seems the same.
Regards,
Curtis
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wolfgang336
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2006, 06:39:36 pm »

Seems I trusted the dealer's description a bit too closely, and then messed up my own attribution with the variations of the G bust type. RIC 30 is it, no variation.

Evan
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