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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Medieval, Islamic and Crusader Coins (Moderators: AlexB, quadrans)  |  Topic: The Papal Corner 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: The Papal Corner  (Read 113501 times)
stlnats
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« Reply #250 on: October 10, 2013, 06:45:07 pm »

Been kinda quiet around here over the summer.  I'd frankly lost track of the new pope's medal issues and just came across this article on the 'net.  Guess there's not spell a check program for die engravers!  Nice looking reverse, but this may now become my kids' Christmas present for me if they're going to restrike them (not a bad thing that).

Vatican Misspells Jesus’ Name on Papal Medal

Someone is going to be saying a “mea culpa.”
 
A medal issued by the Vatican commemorating Pope Francis’ first year as the Bishop of Rome included a rather glaring spelling error, a typo of Biblical proportions.
 
Engraved with the Latin phrase that the pope says inspired him to join the priesthood as a young man, Italy’s state mint misspelled the name of Jesus, calling the son of God Lesus instead.
 
The medals, of which 6,000 were pressed in silver and bronze and another 200 in gold, have now been recalled. The design included a portrait of Pope Francis on the obverse and on the reverse a work by the artist Mariangela Crisciotti.
 
The medals were to go on sale Tuesday and include the Latin inscription: “Vidit ergo Jesus publicanum et quia miserando atque eligendo vidit, ait illi sequere me,” according to the Vatican press office.
 
Mistakenly, however, the word “Lesus” was printed instead.
 
The phrase it the pope’s motto. It means, “Jesus, therefore, saw the publican, and because he saw by having mercy and by choosing, He said to him, ‘Follow me.’”


 Grin
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« Reply #251 on: October 10, 2013, 07:31:49 pm »

Not to be pedantic, but it should be IESVS, since there is no J in Latin.  laugh

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« Reply #252 on: October 10, 2013, 08:21:34 pm »

Not to be pedantic, but it should be IESVS, since there is no J in Latin.  laugh



Quite right and not pedantic at all.  One explanation I saw is that someone confused the correct "I" for a lower case L rather than a J.  As you point out wrong either way but wouldn't it be a hoot if they restruck the medals with a "J?"  

Grin
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« Reply #253 on: October 14, 2013, 01:15:52 pm »

I would be...if the correction of the error was just as wrong as the original!   Cool

The media here in the United States has reported this story widely--all saying the 'correct' spelling would be with a J. 

I just laugh.   Grin
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« Reply #254 on: December 02, 2013, 10:49:20 am »

I've just added a couple of new testones to my gallery.  Both pics are from the seller.  

Neither of these coins are likely to win any OTD accolades, but I consider them to be perfectly good and very inexpensive "space fillers" for my set.  I particularly like the M82 (1684) with the 3/4 profile of the papal arms.   This sort of obverse was also used for a mezzo of Innocent and it still presents nicely (at least I think so) even on this lower grade coin.  The M116 (1689) has a reverse arrangement with elements interweaving in an interesting way as well.    

Perhaps saying so risks being considered certifiable, but I still find it a delight to add what might be considered to be such wretched coins to my collection.  What fun!

 Grin
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« Reply #255 on: December 03, 2013, 03:25:05 am »

I think they are both very nice coins. Congratulations!

Regards,
Ignasi
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« Reply #256 on: December 03, 2013, 06:46:55 am »

Thanks Ignasi! 

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« Reply #257 on: January 05, 2014, 08:30:53 pm »

A few medals to share ...




Gregory XIII - New Roman College

by Bernardino Passero, 1582


Cast, Bronze, 59 mm Ø

Obverse: Bust of Gregory XIII facing right, with hand raised in benediction, wearing camauro and mozzetta. Around,  GENERALI · COLLEG · SOCIETATIS · IESV · ROME · EXTRVCTO · ET · DOTATO . Smaller, and within the outer text,  · GREGORIVS · X · III · AN · PON · X .

Reverse: Gregory XIII kneeling in prayer facing left with head uplifted towards a figure of Jesus in clouds, who is gesturing to the building of the Roman College below, in front of which is a flock of sheep. On the ground in front of Gregory is the papal tiara; a pastoral staff lies in the foreground; behind him is a tree. Around,  GREGORIO · PASTORI · OPTIMO · PATERNA · CARITATE · OVES · PASCENTI · . In smaller text, around the figure of Jesus,  PASCE · OVES · MEAS .

Foundation medal for the new building for the Jesuit College in Rome.

The Jesuit College in Rome was originally established by Saint Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits, on February 18, 1551. The school was raised to the rank of university when Pope Paul IV authorized it in 1556 to confer degrees in theology and philosophy. Over the years, it grew in enrollment and reached over a thousand students. Gregory XIII sought to give the college a better suitable, leading to the construction of a new edifice, as illustrated on the reverse of the medal. Great sums of money were spent on the project, which was largely supported financially by the pope himself. The Florentine architect Bartolomeo Ammannati was placed in charge of the project, and the work was overseen by the Jesuit Giuseppe Valeriano. The first stone was laid on January 11, 1582 at a ceremony which was celebrated by Cardinal Gustavillani. Work proceeded quickly, and the college was operating in the building by 1584. Final completion however would not occur until after the death of Gregory. Due to his patronage, the college would become known as the Gregorian University.

References: CNORP 781, Toderi-Vannel 2355




Urban VIII - New Fortifications for the Port of Civitavecchia

by Alessandro Astesano, 1631


Struck, Bronze, 42 mm Ø

Obverse: Bust of Urban VIII facing right wearing decorative cope. Around,  VRBANVS · VIII · PONT · MAX · A · VIIII . On the truncation,  A · ASTESSANO · F · .

Reverse: Bird's eye view of the port and city of Civitavecchia. Above and around,  NVNC RE PERFECTO , bordered by two bees.

Annual medal for the ninth year of Urban VIII's reign, issued on June 29, 1632. The original emission consisted of 230 examples in gold, 450 in silver, and 100 in bronze.

Civitavecchia was the major port for Rome, being important not only as a major commercial port but also as the home of the pontifical navy on the west coast of Italy. Like his predecessors, Urban VIII ensured that the port was always kept in continuous repair, and he also ordered stronger fortifications to be built to protect this important location. Nathan Whitman notes that, "By featuring on a medal the defensive and commercial aspects of this major port Urban was making as assertion of strength that was simultaneously military and economic."

Provenance: From the collection of Michael Hall.

Exhibited in Roma Resurgens: Papal Medals from the Age of the Baroque by Nathan T. Whitman and John L. Varriano. [n. 60, p. 79]

References: Miselli 245, Modesti "Annuale" 99, Roma Resurgens 60




Alexander VII - New Arsenal at Civitavecchia

by Gioacchino Francesco Travani, 1659


Cast, Silvered Bronze, 69.0 mm Ø

Obverse: Bust of Alexander VII facing left, wearing camauro, cassock, and undecorated stole. Around,  ALEXANDER · VII · P · M · PIVS · IVST · OPT · SENEN · PATR · GENTE · CHISIVS · MDCLIX · . On truncation,  FT · F .

Reverse: Bird's eye view of the fortified port of Civitavecchia. Above, on scroll,  NAVALE CENTVMCELL .

From 1659-1660, Alexander VII undertook a project of constructing a new ship-building arsenal at Civitavecchia, led by the famed artist and architect Gian Lorenzo Bernini. This medal shows the initial layout for the proposed six bays of the arsenal, present as a row of six parallel openings at the rear of the harbor, directly to the left of the fort which is present on the right. For the final design, the bays were split into pairs which were set at an angle of 30° to one another. A smaller, struck medal was later made in 1660 with this final design. On the reverse, the inscription NAVALE CENTVMCELL (Port of Centumcellae) refers to the original name for the harbor, which had been constructed by the emperor Trajan.

References: Miselli 566, Roma Resurgens 91




Alexander VII - Construction of the Church of the Assumption

by Gioacchino Francesco Travani, 1662


Cast, Bronze, 66 mm Ø

Obverse: Bust of Alexander VII facing left, wearing tiara and decorative cope featuring a scene of the Annunciation. Around,  ALEX · VII · PONT · OPT · MAX · . Beneath the bust,  · A · VII · .

Reverse: Frontal view of the Church of the Assumption. Above and around,  BENE · FVNDATA · DOMVS · DOMINI · B · VIRGINI · . Below and around,  ARICINORVM PATRONAE .

Foundation medal for the Church of the Assumption in Ariccia. Though unsigned, the piece has been traditionally attributed to Travani on the grounds of style due to similarity to several other cast pieces of Alexander VII from this time.

This particular design is unlisted and unknown in any of the major collections, and is possibly unique. Medals are well-known which are based on the same general design, though the details between this medal and those differ significantly. On the other medals, the regnal year of the pope is included in the large inscription around the edge on the obverse, and the area underneath the bust contains the date  1662  in Arabic numerals. Also, the scene on the cope shows Jesus carrying the cross, rather than the Annunciation. Turning to the reverse, the positioning of the inscriptions is slightly different. Above and around is  BENE · FVNDATA · DOMVS · DOMINI , while below and around is  B · VIRGINI · ARICINORVM · PATRONAE . This lower inscription is also on a scroll in the other version.

In late 1661, Gian Lorenzo Bernini began work on the design for a new church across from the ducal palace in Ariccia (which he would also renovate). The final design for the church is given on this foundation medal, though the two flanking loggias are not shown. Construction began in 1662, and was completed in time for Alexander to hold mass there on May 16, 1664, consecrating the new church.

Provenance: From the collection of Francesco Calveri.

References: c.f. Miselli 592, c.f. Roma Resurgens 98
 
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« Reply #258 on: January 06, 2014, 09:06:43 am »

Excellent medals!  Nice to read some of the back story as to why the medals were issued!
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« Reply #259 on: January 07, 2014, 07:00:12 am »

Excellent medals!  Nice to read some of the back story as to why the medals were issued!

+1, wonderful medals Joe.  Esp like the two big ones of Alex 7th!

 Grin
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« Reply #260 on: January 08, 2014, 07:11:01 pm »

Thanks guys!  I though you might also like to see these two medals.  Though not papal, they are of cardinals and thus are kind of related.



Cardinal Ippolito d'Este

by Gianfederico Bonzagni, c. 1547/1572


Bronze, 46.0 mm Ø, 32 g

Obverse: Bust of Ippolito d'Este facing left with beard and wearing hooded cassock. Around, HIPPOLYTVS · ESTEN · S · R · E · PRESB · CARD · FERRAR · (Ippolito d'Este, Priest of the Holy Roman Church, Cardinal of Ferrara). Under the bust, · FED · PARM · (Federico the Parmense).

Reverse: Abraham kneeling before three draped men. Behind Abraham are a building a tree. Above and around, · NE TRANSEAS · SERVVM · TVVM · (Pass Not Away From Thy Servant).

Ippolito d'Este (1509-1572) was the second son of Alfonso I d'Este, duke of Ferrara, and Lucrezia Borgia. He was created cardinal by Pope Paul III in 1538 by and was appointed papal legate in France in 1561. A cultivated and wealthy man, Ippolito was a patron of the arts and of medallists, with six different medals of him known. Vannel & Toderi posit that this medal was probably executed in the later years of Ippolito's life.

The reverse scene and legend are taken from Genesis 18:2-4 (And when he had lifted up his eyes, there appeared to him three men standing near him: and as soon as he saw them he ran to meet them from the door of his tent, and adored down to the ground. And he said: Lord, if I have found favour in thy sight, pass not away from thy servant: But I will fetch a little water, and wash ye your feet, and rest ye under the tree.).

References: Attwood 962, Börner 492, Johnson 44, Milan 907, NGA 429, Vannel-Toderi 2189




Cardinal Prospero Publicola Santacroce

by Federico Cocciola, 1579


Bronze, 55 mm Ø, 77 g

Obverse: Bust of Prospero Santacroce facing right, tonsured and bearded, wearing a hooded cassock. Around, · PROSPER · SANCTACRVCIVS · S · R · E · CARD · (Prospero Santacroce, Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church). On truncation, FED COC (Federico Cocciola).

Reverse: View of the planned Villa Gerocomio, its garden, entry gate, and the surrounding hills. Around, in spaced out letters, GEROCOMIO . Below, 1579 .

Prospero Publicola Santacroce (1514-1589) was born in Rome and was created cardinal by Pope Pius IV in 1565. He was Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals from January 9, 1581 to January 8, 1582.

In 1579, he purchased a strip of land four miles east of Tivoli on which he planned to build his retirement villa. Built on the remains of an ancient Roman villa, its name, Villa Gerocomio, comes from a Greek word meaning retreat for the aged. The reverse of the medal shows how Santacroce envisioned the villa, with a garden, fish pond, grove, aviary, and other accompaniments. However, it seems that the plan was never realized as there are no traces of the structures on the grounds.

References: Attwood 972, Börner 486, Johnson 49, Milan 1903-5, NGA 434, Toderi-Vannel 2345
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« Reply #261 on: January 12, 2014, 04:59:09 pm »

A couple of pickups from the recent NYINC show:




Pope Clement IX

by Alberto Hamerani, 1667/8


Bronze, 34.5 mm Ø, 15.9 g

Obverse: Bust of Clement IX facing left, wearing camauro, mozzetta, and decorative stole. Around, CLEMENS · IX · PONT · MAX · ANNO · I · . On the truncation, · ALBERT · AMERANO · F · .

Reverse: A pelican, with wings outstretched, pierces her breast with her beak, from which blood flows to nourish its young. All standing within a nest on the ground. Above and around, · ALIIS · NON · SIBI · CLEMENS · (Mercy For Others, Not For Himself). Below, on a stone, AH .

With a warm brown patina and thin planchet with fine filing on the edge, this is likely an early strike.

The reverse inscription is the personal motto which Clement IX chose for his papacy. The reverse scene of a pelican in her piety, a classical allegory for Jesus Christ, reinforces the notion of the mercy that the new pope has for the people.

Reference: Miselli 682




Pope Innocent XI

by Giovanni Hamerani, 1680


Gilt Bronze, 35.2 mm Ø, 22.5 g

Obverse: Bust of Innocent XI facing right, wearing camauro, mozzetta, and decorative stole. Around, INNOCEN · XI · PONT · M · A · IIII . Under the bust, · HAMERANVS · F · .

Reverse: Allegorical representation of the Catholic Faith standing, facing left, holding a chalice with radiant host in her right hand and supporting a cross with her left. In the background, the Tiber River, with the Ponte Sant'Angelo on the right and St. Peter's Basilica in the background on the left. Above and around, IN · SÆCVLVM / STABIT (Forever It Shall Stand). On a stone to the left of the figure's feet, 1680 .

Struck on a thicker flan, this is probably a later strike.

Annual medal issued on June 29, 1680, with the original issue consisting of 129 in gold and 265 in silver.

Louis XIV of France was constantly trying to separate the Church of France from the Church of Rome or to even bring the Holy See under his control. The reverse inscription of this medal reinforces the concept that the Roman Church both had its own temporal autonomy and was the spiritual authority for all catholicism, for all time. Innocent XI warned Louis XIV many times to halt his ambitions against the Church, including under threat of excommunication.

References: Miselli 121, Modesti "Annuale" 157
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« Reply #262 on: February 24, 2014, 08:46:16 am »

I recently bought a small collection of 5 medieval Papal State coins. My numismatic interests mainly concerns Danish medieval coins and Roman, but out of curiosity I bought these as they were fairly cheap and potentially interesting (I had just finished watching The Borgias on TV). So knowing next to nothing about coins from the Papal States I am hoping some of the knowledgeable members here could educate me.

I am listing the descriptions for each coin as provided by the auction site, if any of these are wrong I would be grateful for a correction. I am especially interested in their specific denominations (gros, carlino, sesino, denier, etc.) as I suspect the information from the auction site might not be correct. Secondly I would like to hear about their quality, are they terrible or as-expected for these types. Finally I am of course interested in knowing about their rarity and perhaps their individual estimated values. I doubt I am so lucky, but on mcsearch.info I saw an example of the Sede Vacante 1378 coin sold for 4000 euro in 2010, which is far more than what I paid! I assume that must have been a particularly rare subtype or something right?



[BROKEN PHOTO BUCKET IMAGE LINK REMOVED BY ADMIN]
1) Sede Vacante 1378, 1 denier n/d, Avignon, Berman 217
Obv: X SEDE VACANTE
Rev: SANCTVS PETRVS


[BROKEN PHOTO BUCKET IMAGE LINK REMOVED BY ADMIN]
2) Nicholas V, 2 denier n/d, Avignon 1447 - 1455, Berman 345
Obv: NICOLAS PP QVINTVS
Rev: SANCTVS PETRVS



[BROKEN PHOTO BUCKET IMAGE LINK REMOVED BY ADMIN]
3) Alexander VI, 1 carlin n/d, Avignon 1492 - 1503, Berman 548
Obv: ALEXAN-DER PP VI
Rev: SAN-TVS PET-RVS



[BROKEN PHOTO BUCKET IMAGE LINK REMOVED BY ADMIN]
4) Pius IV, 1 carlin n/d, Avignon 1559 - 1565, Berman 1086
Obv: PIVS PP QVARTVS
Rev: CARO-C.DE.B-ORBO-N.L.AV


[BROKEN PHOTO BUCKET IMAGE LINK REMOVED BY ADMIN]
5) Pius V, 1 carlin n/d, Avignon 1566 - 1572, Berman 1132
Obv: PIVS PP QVINTVS
Rev: CARO-C.DE.B-ORBO-N.L.AV



Please note that I have yet to pick-up these coins, so I can’t give any information about size and weight at this point, and therefore these are also the seller’s pictures.
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« Reply #263 on: February 24, 2014, 10:51:46 am »

Welcome Michael,

Not exactly in "my" primary area of interest, but as best as I can tell from a quick scan the coins are accurately described by Berman # including mints and denominations.  In terms of quality, I'd consider them as "fine" or thereabouts but that's just based on the scans.   Earlier papal can be wretched in appearance and these are certainly much better than that.  We don't discuss value here (see the rules) but if you have the Berman book you can get a sense of relative value.  Overall, a pretty nice group which I'd have been happy to buy (if "fairly cheap") and would certainly consider them better than "hole fillers."  Just my opinion.  

 Grin


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« Reply #264 on: February 24, 2014, 02:11:38 pm »

Hi stlnats,
Thank you for the friendly welcome and for your opinion, it's much appreciated  Smiley
Also I am sorry to have brought up the value aspect, please ignore that part of my initial post (admins feel free to delete that part).

Unfortunately I do not have access to the Berman's book, if anyone here have the book I would be happy to hear if Berman lists any interesting information besides what is listed already. I already noticed that the Pius IV coin must have been minted in 1565, as Charles de Bourbon (referenced on the reverse of the coin) only became papal legate in this year, the last year of Pius IV.
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« Reply #265 on: March 15, 2014, 04:45:22 am »

I am not sure how many members on this board takes an interest in medieval papal coins, however, I would very much like to learn more about them if anyone is interested in discussing them.

One of the coins I posted above was a Sede Vacante from 1378, which I can understand was minted during one of the shortest conclaves. It took just 13 days from pope Gregory XI died to pope Urban VI sat on the chair of saint Peter. Obviously, the coin dies must have been produced in advance of Gregory's death, but still, isn't 13 days a very short time to start up a whole new coin production? How many coins of this type would likely have been minted in this short time spand?

My main numismatic interest lies in danish medieval coins and I know that Denmark had a very efficient "renovatio monetae" system, where last year's coin type would be deemed invalid and hence collected and re-smelted into the current type. Does anyone know how the papal coin system worked? Did each type have a limited circulation period or were they valid coin throughout different papal periods?

Also if you have any interesting information about the papal coin system or on some specific coins, please share, I would love to hear. Everything is of interest as this area is completely new to me.

Thanks!
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« Reply #266 on: March 15, 2014, 06:00:57 am »

Welcome/velkommen Michael i think you will enjoy this fantastic Forum Joe and many others has build up.  Thumbs Up Good to se another fellow country man in here.  Smiley

Cheers Kim
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« Reply #267 on: March 18, 2014, 02:07:57 am »

Hi Kim, thank you for your nice welcome, much appreciated  Smiley
I bought my first coins from Joe sometime around 2000-2002, but it is only now I found this forum. Although there apparently isn't much interest in medieval papal coins, luckily I see many other interesting topics around, hopefully I can contribute something in those sections instead.
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« Reply #268 on: June 17, 2014, 10:16:48 am »

Been a bit quiet around here of late, so I thought I'd post my latest "Melius" testone, a Muntoni 90 which I just added to my gallery.  Seller's pix that I cobbled together.  I purchased this accidentally - d'oh - but it looks nice and has an interesting angled arms on the obverse - a design technique that really livens up the obverse and that I especially enjoy.  I've certainly made much worse purchases so no worries on this one. 

Also, we're within a few days of the feasts of SS Peter and Paul and I wondered if anyone had heard/has an illustration of the 2014 Vatican annual medal.

What fun!  Grin

   
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« Reply #269 on: June 17, 2014, 09:28:10 pm »

Nice testone!  I like the curved arms on the front and how it matches the curved cartouche on the reverse.  The palm fronds on the obverse and branches on the reverse are another nice touch!
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« Reply #270 on: June 18, 2014, 06:07:50 am »

Thanks Joe. As most of this series, well designed and lots going on in a relatively small area.  Makes 'em fun to collect and not a big issue if you pick up a dup or two.
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« Reply #271 on: June 18, 2014, 03:36:06 pm »

Nice piece!  You have to love the Baroque artistic sensibilities of these pieces!

Here's my only example.  It's badly scratched (from a botched cleaning attempt, maybe?) but still an interesting piece.

Muntoni 79
Berman 2103
KM 433
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« Reply #272 on: June 20, 2014, 06:35:55 am »

Nice piece!  You have to love the Baroque artistic sensibilities of these pieces!

Here's my only example.  It's badly scratched (from a botched cleaning attempt, maybe?) but still an interesting piece.

Thanks Pabst.  I really like the baroque issues.  Many, such as your testone, are still interesting and well worth purchasing regardless of condition and make a refreshing change from the focus on TPG "top pops" of otherwise uninspired issues infecting a lot of numismatics.   

What fun!

 Grin
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« Reply #273 on: August 08, 2014, 05:30:39 am »

Lanz put up a Benedict XII (1334-1342) picciolo on eBay and I won the auction...not a bad coin, and for a reasonable price!

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« Reply #274 on: August 08, 2014, 09:41:17 am »

Congrats!  Looks like its all there too. 

 Grin
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