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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Ancient Coin Forum (Moderator: goldenancients)  |  Topic: OK, let's see those Ugly Ducklings... 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: OK, let's see those Ugly Ducklings...  (Read 9445 times)
Paul Oatman
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« Reply #25 on: July 13, 2005, 09:10:27 pm »

Behold my shame.  This one used to have a ghost image of what it was once.  From my first lot of uncleaned coins.  Soap+Brass Brush+Water+less than 30 seconds= SHINY and the ghost image in its corrosion entirely gone.

Used to be a Trajan seated on platform with advisors, addressing a group soldiers.  You used to be able to clearly make out RATOR on the reverse and could see the soldiers legs and midsections clearly... but now... I've got to draw some of the detail for you.

Still.  Rarer.

 Smiley
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curtislclay
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« Reply #26 on: August 07, 2005, 12:34:34 am »

      I don't mind a poor coin, if nothing else is available!
      Around 1970 I bought my first large Roman bronze medallion, a bimetallic piece of Commodus with rev. p m tr p xi imp vii cos v p p' target='_blank'>VIRTVS AVG P M TR P XI IMP VII COS V P P, Roma seated r. above cuirass and shields, balancing parazonium on her knee, in background left a Victory holding a round shield, apparently intending to place it on a trophy in background right.
      The same type, I determined, occurred only two other times on Roman coins:  on a unique bronze medallion of Lucius Verus, and on a unique sestertius of Titus as Augustus in the Paris collection, with legend ROMA S C, the second coin illustrated below.
      Here, in corroded state, is a second specimen of that Titus sestertius, from the same rev. die as the Paris coin, but with portrait right instead of left on the obverse!
      This right-facing obv. die is also rare in its own right, for its legend begins IMP TITVS CAES rather than the normal IMP T CAES.  IMP TITVS CAES is the form used on Titus' very rare sestertii of 79, which also occurs on a very few dies, apparently the earliest of the year, in 80. 
      Unfortunately the IMP TITVS is almost corroded to illegibility on my coin, but I think enough remains to guarantee the reading.  It would be nice to settle the matter for good, however, by finding a clear specimen from the same obv. die!
      My new coin is so broad and round that the thought crossed my mind, could this type for Titus just be the invention of a clever and skilled modern forger, copying the genuine medallions of Commodus and Verus?  So I was relieved to discover in our photofile that the left-facing obv. die of the Paris specimen was also used to strike an obviously authentic sest. of Titus with one of his normal rev. types, IVD CAP S C, Jew and Jewess below palm tree, in Stack's Knobloch Sale of 1980, lot 352.
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Curtis Clay
Rupert
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« Reply #27 on: August 22, 2005, 02:33:34 pm »

A beautiful portrait, absolutely! Also, you can read the letters ...MNA to the right which means its part of the first emission of Rome which, if I remember it correctly, was struck at Rome only until late 194 and which is thus rather rare. Rarer than denarii, and much rarer than the Eastern denarii which had this early legend for a longer time.

Rupert
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TRPOT
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« Reply #28 on: August 22, 2005, 03:37:52 pm »

I certainly didn't realize how rare this coin was at the time that I bought it. I just fell in love with the portrait. Even if it was a very common issue, it'd have been a steal at the price I paid for it.

Perhaps this coin is a little too nice for this thread. Not a true "ugly duckling".

I wonder if any of these IVNO REGINA reverse dies were leftovers from the Manlia Scantilla Sesterces of the previous year.
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Rupert
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« Reply #29 on: August 22, 2005, 05:30:46 pm »

I'm 100% sure Curtis can tell you that. (And if he doesn't know, nobody does.)

Rupert
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curtislclay
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« Reply #30 on: August 22, 2005, 08:33:31 pm »

    I expressed the same thought in my Oxford thesis of 1972, p. 124, not just because the type is the same as Scantilla's, but because it behaves very strangely for Julia in 194.
    Types were usually struck for Julia in strict succession, one after the other.  The die sequence of Julia's sestertii and middle bronzes, however, suggests that in 194 the IVNO REGINA type INTERRUPTED the VESTA type, which was struck both before and after IVNO REGINA
     Moreover the type was not struck at all on Julia's aurei and denarii in 194.  She has no IVNO REGINA aurei or denarii with DOMNA still in her obv. legend, and the gold and silver coins of that type without DOMNA seem to belong to 196 not 194, when the type was also revived on sestertii.  This was contrary to usual practice, which was that the same reverse type was struck for Julia IN ALL METALS.
     It would make sense if the strange intrusion of the IVNO REGINA type onto Julia's sestertii and dupondii in 194 resulted from the decison to use some old rev. dies of Scantilla's which happened to have been kept.  However I have not yet noted an actual rev. die that was shared by Scantilla and Domna.
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Curtis Clay
William J Bligh
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« Reply #31 on: August 23, 2005, 01:33:20 pm »

I know I posted this coin a few months ago in another section, but it seems relevant, and it is my personal favorite 'ugly' out of all the coins I've owned

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Rupert
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« Reply #32 on: August 23, 2005, 02:10:41 pm »

Wow, I'd love to have that coin, no matter what condition! This sestertius in EF+ would buy a minor house or a BIG car!

Rupert
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maridvnvm
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« Reply #33 on: August 25, 2005, 07:38:49 am »

This one is REALLY UGLY. It is an Emesa denarius of Septimius Severus. It is only of interest in trying to figure out what has happened to the reverse. It is supposed to be SAECVL FELICIT, creacent and seven stars but the legend is all over the place, with clogged letters and some odd ones, reading more like AE[C]VI C[ELIC]IT.


Regards,
Martin
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areich
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« Reply #34 on: September 09, 2005, 01:02:35 pm »

This Aurelian is so ugly, it makes me angry to look at it.
The condition is VERY fine, in those few places that don't have that butt-ugly corrosion.

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Congius
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« Reply #35 on: September 23, 2005, 09:40:18 am »

This one's right at home in this thread!

A common enough type - Constantine I SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI - issued by Constantine all pleased with himself after his victory over Maxentius!

What makes this nasty specimen worth the $3.46 is the mintmark - PARL indicating Arles rather than the common Rome or Ostia. You can just make out enough detail to attribute it: RIC VII Arles 9 R5.

Apart from being scarce, what makes the Arles issue of this type interesting is that it's testament to the Ostia-Arles mint transfer that took place in 313 - the Arles mint not just picking up with Constantine's regular coinage, but also making this special victory type due to the transfer from Ostia. Arles issued this type for both Constantine and Licinius, but not Daia, so the transfer seems to have taken place after Daia's death (Constantine did issue coins for Daia after his victory, so he wasn't out of favor).

The date of the Ostia-Arles mint transfer is confirmed to 313 by the two Arles types made to commemorate the transfer - VTILITAS PVBLICA which shows Moneta being seen off departing (from Ostia) by boat, and PROVIDENTIAE AVGG which shows her arriving and being greeted (at Arles). These types exist with consular bust marking Constantine's COS III in 313.

Ben


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basemetal
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« Reply #36 on: December 28, 2005, 11:41:27 pm »

Hey!...Your'e talking about my whole collection here dude! They may be ugly but they are in my temporary possession!
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Pep
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« Reply #37 on: February 22, 2006, 09:43:12 pm »

Emperor:  Septimius Severus (r. 193-211 AD)
Date:  201 AD (later) or after
DenominationLimes Denarius

Obverse:  SEVERVS PIVS AVG
Emperor Severus Pius
Head right, laureate

ReversePART MAX PM TR P VIIII
Victor over Parthia Chief Priest Tribune Ninth Term.
Trophy and two captives.

Limes Denarius of:  RIC IV Septimius Severus 176; VM 95 (Rome mint)
2.89g; 18.3mm; 195°

It looks better in hand, but just slightly tongue  It is still a very interesting coin for me, being a Limes.

Kevin  Smiley
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Corduba
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« Reply #38 on: February 24, 2006, 01:52:48 am »

This is a really ugly Julia Titi sestertius i have.

Observe: DIVAE JULIAE AVG. DIVI TITI F. S.P.Q.R.
Reverse: IMP. CAES. DOMIT. AVG. GERM. COS. XV. PER. P.P. S.C.

It´s not the picture, It´s the coin.

Ignacio.
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Marcus Aurelius
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« Reply #39 on: February 24, 2006, 04:46:34 am »

Here is mine,Faustina denarius.But i cant find my ugliest sesterz,oooo You all have to see that one:burned with holes and rust.Ugly like hell.
I want to give this coin to someone.Anybody interested? angel
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Rupert
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« Reply #40 on: February 24, 2006, 10:38:37 am »

Hey Marcus Aurelius,

I would urgently advise you to keep this denarius. It's unpublished in Cohen and RIC and probably a hybrid with an obverse of Diva Faustina II. and a rev. that belongs to her lifetime coins.

Rupert
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curtislclay
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« Reply #41 on: February 24, 2006, 11:16:06 am »

But not a mint product I think.  Note the scraggly lettering, DIA for PIA in obv. legend, rather crude style.
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Curtis Clay
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« Reply #42 on: February 24, 2006, 11:28:59 am »

Spaghetti hair and all, you're right. Still (IMHO) a very desirable coin!

Rupert
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Robin Ayers
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Ms. arizonarobin :)


« Reply #43 on: February 25, 2006, 05:46:13 pm »

My shameful ugly duckling.

I got this in an uncleaned lot and it took YEARS of soaking to even get it to where I could identify anything  Undecided
But in the end it looks like a Domitia.  Laureate head of Domitian right  :Greek_Delta:OMITIANON KAI :GreeK_Sigma:APA  :Greek_Theta:E GreeK_Sigma :GreeK_Sigma:A :Greek_Delta:OI

Diademed bust of Domitia right  :Greek_Delta:omitian  :GreeK_Sigma:eba GreeK_Sigma GreeK_Sigma :GreeK_Sigma:thn

despite its appearance all that work and the fact Domitia is on it makes it keeper  Smiley
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b70
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« Reply #44 on: February 26, 2006, 02:48:45 am »

I haven't been collecting long but I already have a number of ugly ducklings. Here are a few select specimens.  Grin



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Istinpolin
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« Reply #45 on: February 26, 2006, 07:53:48 pm »

Terminally bad.

010 AE (Orichalcum – brass) Sestertius, Posthumous issue in honor of Augustus, struck by Tiberius 14-37 A.D.
Mint of Rome, 36-7 A.D.
Obv: DIVO / AVGVSTO / SPQR. Cultus figure of Augustus in ornamented cart drawn by 4 elephants, left.
Rx: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST P M TR POT XXXIIX around SC.
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stickman
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« Reply #46 on: March 10, 2006, 07:49:13 pm »

Those with sensitive stomachs should look away.....


The obverse...not too bad you might say....

Then.....the reverse...........arrrghhh!
It looks like someone lost their lunch on it.   Lips Sealed
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Massanutten
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« Reply #47 on: March 10, 2006, 08:33:39 pm »

  OK Stick..... The reaction was instantaneous!  Any suggestions on how to get this yuk out of my keyboard?
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virtvsprobi
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« Reply #48 on: March 10, 2006, 10:42:44 pm »

Then.....the reverse...........arrrghhh! It looks like someone lost their lunch on it.

Little you know...  This is the supremely rare PIZZAE ANCHOVIAE • CRVSTAE PROFVNDAE reverse of Tacitus. 2nd example known (yours!), the first being in the BNF
and stamped with the Gonzaga eaglet. What a fortunate man you are!

See what happens when one doesn't research/attribute properly? You owe poor Bob a new keyboard!

G/<
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AncientCoins
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« Reply #49 on: March 11, 2006, 07:33:14 am »

Yuck!  That coin's reverse almost made me lose my breakfast, Stick! afro

Andrew
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