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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Books and References (Moderator: Severus_Alexander)  |  Topic: New Roman Coinage Book (I have HIGH hopes) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: New Roman Coinage Book (I have HIGH hopes)  (Read 2565 times)
Jericho
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« on: February 25, 2003, 03:26:49 pm »

http://rossperry.com/roman_bronze_coins.html

Roman Bronze Coins: From Paganism to Christianity

Due out in April.

"During the seventy-year period covered by Roman Bronze Coins, Christian symbols on coins increased as that religion gradually replaced the traditional Roman gods as the official state religion. The book begins with the Emperor Diocletian’s empire-wide coin reform and his failure to establish price controls. It transitions into the fourth century where his successful reorganization of the Roman government paved the way for Constantine the Great’s thirty year rule that ushered the Christian transformation.

This convenient, one-volume reference uses the humble bronze coin to trace that story and provide coin collectors several different ways to identify and catalog the coin:

By ruler or personage

Because so many rulers and personages shared the same name and titles, there are several charts that, by the process of elimination, help you identify the correct ruler.

By the reverse type

If the reverse legend is visible, consult the General Index; if the reverse scene is visible, crosscheck the coin in the chapter, “Collecting by Theme, the Iconography of the Reverse.” Generally speaking, new reverse types for rulers are quiet rare, but if they exist, this book will help you spot them quickly.

By reverse variety

Once you know the type, you can determine whether this is a variety that has been expanded in this book. The easiest way is to see if there is an asterisk (*) before the catalog number.

By mint and year struck

The chapter, “Dating and Controlling the Coins, the Roman Way,” lists different mint, sequence and other marks and is divided in exergue and field markings sections. It also contains speculation as to the meanings of these marks, letters, and symbols. Consulting the individual mint city pages will allow, by the process of elimination, the identification of the year(s) when a particular coin was struck.

By historical context

Once you have determined the year or years that a coin was struck, look in Chapter One, the “History of the Period and Associated Coin Types” to see if that coin has been tied to a specific historical event.

The Coin Attribute Reference Chart, in Appendix A, should provide a ready reference for coin dates, names, value, weight, and other attributes.

The Author

Victor Failmezger is a retired U.S. naval officer, president of Global Initiatives, Inc., a small, Virginia-based consulting firm, and a principal in a non-profit environmental technology foundation. During his 22 years in the Navy, he was stationed for many years in Europe (Italy and Germany) and was introduced to the avocation of coin collecting. He is a frequent international lecturer on remote sensing and the environment and once a year on ancient coins to Ms. Steinberg’s third grade class. He holds a Master of Arts, in International Relations from Boston University (BU, 1973) and a Bachelor of Arts, in History, from Southern Methodist University (SMU, 1969). He is fluent in both Italian and German.

The Images

Doug Smith combines his two hobbies—photography and ancient coins—in Roman Bronze Coins. A 1968 graduate of Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Indiana, majoring in Classics, Doug first photographed Roman coins for use in a term paper in 1965. He retired from the U.S. Army after spending 20 years as a photographic laboratory technician. He specializes in Eastern mint denari of Septimius Severus and technically interesting coins. A desire to learn HTML led to the beginning of his educational web site in 1997. The first page posted on the website dealt with the question of stirrups shown on coins of
Constantius II and was based on observations made by his long-time friend, Victor Failmezger. This book is a continuation of that collaboration."

I'm REALLY looking forward to this and the price isn't too bad at $49.95 (cheaper if pre-ordered).  I think it's a cant-miss, but we'll see.

 Grin
jericho

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LordBest
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« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2003, 07:24:00 pm »

Sounds quite good. Smiley
                                   LordBest.
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Julian_II
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« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2003, 09:47:26 pm »

Sounds VERY good!
If you order it now you get a 20% discount.
Also if you want 200 or more you get a 50% discount Roll Eyes

40 dollars is a really good price I think.
I tried to post an order but they don´t ship to Argentina Sad
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Jericho
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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2003, 09:58:57 pm »

HEY JOE, you should carry this  Grin.

jericho
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Julian_II
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« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2003, 10:07:40 pm »

Maybe if Joe buys 200 I could buy one from him! Forum does ship to Argentina Cheesy Cheesy
Joe?? Smiley
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alemmo
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2003, 12:16:50 am »

HMm this book does look good, does it say anywhere or does anyone know how large the book is (how many pages) how exhaustive is it, it really doesn't mention.
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alemmo
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2003, 12:17:17 am »

basically i don't want to buy a book that is like Van MEter because i already have Van Meter Cheesy
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Albert
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« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2003, 09:39:00 am »

I just got my copy of this book last night. All I have had time to do is read the forward and skim through the rest if the book so far. It looks like it's going to be a good reference. It goes into much detail about the types, mints and so on. It has some really good plates of pictures too. It looks like it's going to be a must have for the late Roman collector.

I will try to post more comments as I get more into the book and start using it.

Al
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Jericho
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« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2003, 12:26:16 pm »

Albert, I'll look forward to your review.... I'm almost ready to pull the trigger and buy this but I'm so broke I shouldn't  Undecided.  Not sure why, but the photos don't seem especially enticing to me, not with wildwinds and all the other sites posting photos.  How in-depth does this book get?  Is it similar to Van Meter?  And what portion of the book is taken up by photos?

Roger  
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Albert
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« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2003, 01:31:16 pm »

Roger,

The book is not at all like Van Meter. It is much more detailed and covers many more coins of this period. It gives history of coin types, meaning of reverse types, good dating info and more. As I said, I have only had it since last night and have only spent a short time with it. There are about 20 plates of photos at the end of the book and they are of good quality.

I am glad I bought this book and will probably use it more than Van Meter or Sear Vol. 1 & 2. I also have a copy of the old "Late Roman Bronze Coins". I almost never open this book. It's just to darn hard to use.

In a few days I will post a better review of the new book.

Al
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Jericho
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« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2003, 09:11:14 pm »

So what's the verdict?  Cheesy

Roger
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Albert
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« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2003, 09:40:49 pm »

Well, I have not had too much time to spend with it yet Cry. From what I see so far it's a very good reference. It has very good mint and officina data. I have only looked up one coin but it was able to give the time of minting to within 2 years. I find that pretty imortant. It has images of all the major types and many minor varities.

It lets you catalog the coin but also gives you historical background about the type. It talks about the monetary reform during the reign of Diocletian for example. It is much more than just a catalog which is just what I was looking for. I enjoy learning about my coins and thier time.

I am very glad I bought this book and will use it more than most of my other references. That includes the two new volumes of Sear and my set of Roman Silver Coins.

If you have any specific questions I will try to answer them. I'm sorry I have not had more time to do a better review.

I am going to look up some of my Licinius AE's in the next few days. It should be interesting as I have some very large ones (for his coins) and some pretty small ones. The monetary reform and weight change is very interesting to me. The economy is an important tell tale for history.

Al
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« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2003, 11:04:56 am »

I just received my copy of the book and gave it a brief review.  It is loaded with interesting material and great coin pictures.   If you collect coins of this time frame, I'd highly recommend the book.

I don't collect from this time frame and for the amount of material and the cost, I found it a great investment.

Thank you.
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60_Driver
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« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2004, 03:27:49 pm »

I´ve used it for a couple of months now, and find it´s the first (and usually last) place I look for coins of this time frame.  Very detailed info on the coins and the history surrounding them, more complete than VM and very easy to use.

Highly recommend it.
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« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2004, 03:49:20 pm »

Joe, Please consider selling this book.  I, and I suspect, many members of boards would be happy buying from you and helping out, rather than buying directly from the publisher and giving them that profit.

It looks like it is right down the ally of what is found in unclean lots.

Bob
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Ghengis Jon
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« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2004, 09:32:37 pm »

Roman Bronze Coins: From Paganism to Christianity

My copy arrived today.  Good info here and I do recommend it.  Curtis might not get anything new out of it, but the rest of us can.  Not really organized the way I would have done it, but loads of info that would otherwise have to be gleaned from several sources.   Its worth the money, which is less than 50 bucks all told.
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« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2004, 03:00:36 am »

I also have my copy and I am very happy with this book.  It is well worth $50.00.  They have an interesting numbering system, but once mastered it is very easy to find the listing a coin.

Bob
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