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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Byzantine Coins (Moderators: vercingetorix, wileyc, Paleologos)  |  Topic: Adding Greek Letters 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Adding Greek Letters  (Read 6125 times)
Joe Sermarini
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« on: February 16, 2003, 07:56:18 am »

Since the legends on many many Greek coins, Roman Provincial coins and Byzantine coins are Greek, you may find it useful to include Greek letters in your posts.  To add Greek letters you should first type the legend using the corresponding Latin letters.   Here is a list of Latin letters and there corresponding Greek letters (only letters that are different are listed):

C = C    
D = D      
F = F
G = G
J = J      
L = L
P = P
Q = Q
R = R
S = S
U = U
V = V
W = W
X = X
Y = Y

After you type the Latin letters you want converted to Greek letters, highlight them using your mouse.  With the appropriate letters highlighted, click the red A button (it looks like this )  Clicking the red A button will put the letters you highlighted within HTML code brackets.  The bracket on the left will contain "font=Veranda."  Replace "Veranda" with "Symbol."  When you post your message the letters letters you highlighted will be displayed as Greek letters.
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Joseph Sermarini
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« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2003, 12:03:02 pm »

Interesting! I tried to do this with MS Word  with Insert and then Symbols  and then copy to the board but they get translated back to English.  Shocked

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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2003, 02:52:33 pm »

Lets give it a try Grin.

this is a test. PETHYSTEOKMAHEWQNC
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« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2004, 09:08:42 am »

Nice work! Grin
                   BestDad.  Cool
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petzlaff
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« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2007, 09:00:25 am »

  Greek_omega_small Greek_Omega Greek_omega_small Greek_omega_small Greek_omega_small
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Stefan
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« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2007, 08:46:52 am »

copy from word in standard greek:

              αβγδεζθικλμνξ

if you need  ancient greek you have to load the fonts as follows:

              "old geek serif"

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pmarion
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« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2008, 10:41:26 am »

Quote
"old geek serif"

I've been called an old geek before...    Grin
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LouisvilleKYShop
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« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2011, 09:13:46 pm »

Here is a real novice question, so forgive it please.  When a coin translates to Jesus Christ King of Kings, what language is that exactly?  Basile etc.
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Abu Galyon
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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2011, 05:31:33 am »

Here is a real novice question, so forgive it please.  When a coin translates to Jesus Christ King of Kings, what language is that exactly?  Basile etc.

Greek, but normally (on coins) mostly written in Latin script, i.e., using L not Λ, S not Σ, etc.

Bill R.
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LouisvilleKYShop
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« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2011, 05:33:59 am »

That is what I was hearing and it makes sense.  Thanks!  I guess Rome's Empire did only last 400 years as an empire and the Greeks won after all.
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Abu Galyon
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« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2011, 06:50:57 am »

That is what I was hearing and it makes sense.  Thanks!  I guess Rome's Empire did only last 400 years as an empire and the Greeks won after all.

Even when the Roman Empire was at its height, many more of its subjects spoke Greek than Latin. Latin was the language of the army and of the imperial administration, but outside of Italy anyway it wasn’t used for much else. Greek was the language of literature, philosophy and culture and (just as importantly) also the language of commerce. If a merchant from Gaul wanted to transact business with a trader from Egypt, they would probably find that their only common language (if they had one) was Greek. And if you look at the inscriptions on city monuments and funerary steles from Africa or Pannonia or Anatolia, they are almost always written in Greek, not Latin.

Bill R. 
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ginolerhino2
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« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2012, 11:55:24 pm »

I can also use the Windows Charmap application and chose the font Arial Unicode. Because it is unicode, all kinds of letters are in it, and I can mix Latin, Greek and even Cyrillic letters, as well as different symbols.
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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Byzantine Coins (Moderators: vercingetorix, wileyc, Paleologos)  |  Topic: Adding Greek Letters « previous next »
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