Classical Numismatics Discussion
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Hanukkah Sameach!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Merry Christmas!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958


FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Roman Coins (Moderator: Severus_Alexander)  |  Topic: FTR Falling Horseman article now available online 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: FTR Falling Horseman article now available online  (Read 199 times)
otlichnik
Tribunus Plebis 2016
Procurator Monetae
Caesar
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4651



« on: November 21, 2020, 03:26:01 pm »

The embargo period for KOINON II has now ended so I have uploaded my 33-page article "Back in the saddle again: a re-examination of the FEL TEMP REPARATIO Falling horseman type" to my academia.edu page.

The summary from academia.edu:

This paper is a new study of the FEL TEMP REPARATIO Falling horseman bronze coin type introduced in 348 AD by Constantine I’s two surviving sons, Constans and Constantius II. This article updates much out of date scholarship and attempts to make sense of this often misunderstood reverse type. This article proposes a division of the type into six sequential series, and into sub-types and variations based on the position and design of the horseman. It also offers a new schema for these sub-types and designs. Though other taxonomic schemes have been attempted by previous authors, I believe that this new outline will better assist with understanding the chronology of this type and therefore assist with re-constructing the metrology and economics of the time. The article also discusses the dating of the type and the meaning of its imagery.

https://www.academia.edu/44549791/Back_in_the_saddle_again_a_re_examination_of_the_FEL_TEMP_REPARATIO_Falling_horseman_type

SC

PS.  You can also still purchase the entire volume of KOINON II (and KOINON I) in hard-copy or as an ebook at Archaeopress.

http://www.archaeopress.com/ArchaeopressShop/Public/defaultAll.asp?Series=KOINON
Logged

SC
(Shawn Caza, Ottawa)
Pharsalos
Praetorian
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 96



« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2020, 06:12:05 am »

Thank you for the link to your article, I find the Fel Temp series fascinating and enjoyed your analysis.

I don’t have much of value to add. I agree that the Roman figure is most probably the emperor; as you note the figure in the captives/hut types sometimes wears a diadem but it is hard to tell with the helmet on the falling horseman type. The dress of the figure is pretty consistent across the types though.

In my limited experience some of the most refined engraving work along with heavy flans seem to be from the Antioch mint, from the third series in your analysis. I’m not sure if a silver content analysis has been done on these issues, but clearly celators were given the time to create quality dies. Do you have any thoughts on why Antioch and to an extent Alexandria and Constantinople arguably produce their most beautiful work in series three?

I have posted this elsewhere in relation to the ‘enemy horseman’, and will repeat it here. The two statues below were found in Hatra, Iraq and are dated to the 3rd century CE. The first with the peaked cap is thought to be Sanatruq II, king of Hatra circa 205 to 240 CE. The second is a statue of a 'noble'. Hatra was an important border city with a cosmopolitan population. It was captured and sacked by Shapur I circa 241CE.  The dress on both statues, particularly the trousers, is remarkably similar to the depiction on detailed eastern mint FH types.


* 835883DE-511C-47D7-9F0A-CE7347D6F8F9.jpeg (28.85 KB, 231x636 - viewed 97 times.)

* 6E041B16-1FC2-4A97-96ED-C4A2D545506C.jpeg (28.09 KB, 243x484 - viewed 100 times.)

* D3121487-EE31-4863-8BE7-4DE8FE57F11C.jpeg (941.11 KB, 2287x1158 - viewed 6 times.)

* CBC0475D-3A42-4578-AEDA-7DEA577A368F.jpeg (244.76 KB, 778x858 - viewed 5 times.)
Logged

otlichnik
Tribunus Plebis 2016
Procurator Monetae
Caesar
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4651



« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2020, 02:01:40 pm »

Thanks Pharsalos.  Glad you liked the article.

I don't know why Constantinople, Antioch and Alexandria produced such fine dies.  These were among the most prolific mints at this time so I would be surprised if it was a matter of the engravers being allowed more time.  Given number of officinae and the volume that would imply a higher level of staffing per output than other mints.  It might simply be because these are among the largest cities of the Empire - only Rome rivaled - and they simply had greater access to skilled artisans and good art "schools".

Very interesting point about the trouser-clad "barbarian".  The trouser-wearing barbarian with beard and braids began at Antioch and is clearly some form of nomad.  However, the beardless and brainless trouser wearing barbarian is usually considered to be a germanic type - it started at thessaloniki and was common at Constantinople too before spreading through the West

SC
Logged

SC
(Shawn Caza, Ottawa)
Pekka K
Tribunus Plebis Perpetuus
Procurator Monetae
Caesar
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5880


...one coin at a time...


« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2020, 12:56:06 am »


I read your article many times, and it gives answer to some questions.

But there is one point that gives further question:

First FTR-FH was rated 1000 d.c. and last FTR-FH was rated 10000 d.c.
But did the rate change during series 2 to 5?

Pekka K
Logged

otlichnik
Tribunus Plebis 2016
Procurator Monetae
Caesar
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4651



« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2020, 02:39:50 pm »

Pekka. 

It is hard to be entirely certain but it would appear not.

We have no hard proof of any value changes. 

We know that there were many symbols, but none prior to the M appear universal enough to indicate a change in value.

We know that the size changed several times, but that does not indicate a change in value - in fact it was often done to maintain value during times of inflation.

We know that the M symbol was almost universal and makes little sense as a series name indicator (like A, B and  Greek_Gamma might) and therefore might indicate value.

We know that there was rampant inflation around this time.

We know Bagnall and Bransbourg date a 10-fold increase in intrinsic value to around this time.

So therefore, to me, it is most likely that there was a change in value around this time and the 6th (M) series is the best candidate, but that it was the only change since 348.  Before the 6th series inflation was "addressed" by decreasing module.

I know some authors have postulated a complex series of increasing intrinsic values through marks like A, B,  Greek_GammaGreek_Delta, E, S and M, but I see no proof.  Such a system would be chaotic enough even if every coin were marked with its value, but given the use of such letters was sporadic I don't see how such complexity would be possible.

Shawn

Logged

SC
(Shawn Caza, Ottawa)
Pekka K
Tribunus Plebis Perpetuus
Procurator Monetae
Caesar
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5880


...one coin at a time...


« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2020, 11:28:02 pm »


Very reasonable, thank you.

Yes I have read somewhere that Greek letters indicated
value in 1000 d.c.'s, but I was not satisfied with this idea.
I would leave the last step from 6000 to 10000 d.c.
But we have seen more drastic inflations in modern times.

Pekka K
Logged

Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Roman Coins (Moderator: Severus_Alexander)  |  Topic: FTR Falling Horseman article now available online « previous next »
Jump to:  

Recent Price Reductions in Forum's Shop


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.734 seconds with 33 queries.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity
zoom.asp