Classical Numismatics Discussion
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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Celtic, Barbaric & Tribal Imitative Coins (Moderators: Marcus Aurelius, Lee S)  |  Topic: Celtic obol? 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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VCollector
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« on: March 20, 2019, 09:47:42 am »

Hello, Please identify this coin. 0,99 gr.  width size 13 мм, length -18 мм. The first side - face of a young king in a laurel wreath to the right, second side - horse Thank you!
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VCollector
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2019, 04:46:25 pm »

??
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JBF
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2019, 05:37:27 pm »

You can ask, but if no one replies, they probably can't tell you anything more.  In fact, the fact it is a king/a horse is not obvious from just looking at it, so you know better than most.  I do hope someone can tell you more, but have a little patience, minor celtic coinage must really be an esoteric field.  With a little luck someone might be able to tell you something.

Some things to possibly consider.
Is there a particular die orientation?  Some coins have a particular, both dies up orientation, or one die up, one die down.  die orientation is probably more important where you have a coin of a kind that typically has a die orientation, but a coin you are looking at doesn't.  Bad sign.  I kind of doubt that celts bothered with die orientation, but you might check.
As an obol the coin should be silver, particular weight is significant.  You might be able to conclude that it is a silver coin of a particular weight that would make it an obol (or diobol, or hemiobol,) on "such an such" a standard.  If you can figure out the standard, you might be able to figure out the mints that use that standard.)  something like that can be plausible for Greek, I am not sure it is plausible for celtic.
Of course chances are whatever tribe made them could have used the types for more than one denomination.  You can look at the types and see if you find them elsewhere, then plausibly deduce that yours is a (possibly unpublished) fractional of those.

Kind Regards,
John
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Edessa
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« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2019, 07:55:30 am »

Just a guess, but its probably a minor of the Eastern Celtic "Kugelwange" type.  Do a search on ACSearch for "Kugelwange".  Many of these are only partially struck up and there are a lot of local derivatives.

Eugene
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Eugene
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« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2019, 07:59:32 am »

See Nathan's recent post below for more info:

"History behind Celtic Philip II imitation tetradrachm"

https://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=115901.msg703788#msg703788

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Eugene
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2019, 12:41:12 pm »

Thank you very much. Yes. Kugelwange
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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Celtic, Barbaric & Tribal Imitative Coins (Moderators: Marcus Aurelius, Lee S)  |  Topic: Celtic obol? « previous next »
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