FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board

Numismatic and History Discussions => Celtic, Barbaric & Tribal Imitative Coins => Topic started by: Cleisthenes on January 28, 2007, 12:54:08 am



Title: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: Cleisthenes on January 28, 2007, 12:54:08 am
There are so many wonderful Celtic coins (duh!).  Here is one that I'd love to acquire:

CELTIC BRITAIN, Cunobeline, 10-20 AD. Rose Gold Stater (5.41 gm) of Camulodunum. Classic type. Grain-ear / Celticized horse. S.286. vArd.2010v. aXF, rev. die break.

Jim

ADMIN NOTE:

SEE CELTIC AND OTHER TRIBAL COINS FOR SALE IN THE FORM CONSIGNMENT SHOP: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=800 (http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=800)




Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: Kernos on January 28, 2007, 11:33:28 am
Good idea Jim! Here is my contribution for day 2:

This coin is de La Tour 7187-7186, cf 7191, attributed by him to the Caletes, The modern attribution is uncertain, though there is evidence that it is Remi (La Tour II, Castelin 305), probably Lingones, Aedui or Sequani (see Freeman and Sears Fixed Price List 12 Winter 2007, lot 7); CCBM 566-76

It is a silver quinarius, 1.80 gm, late 1st century BCE after 40 BC.

OBV: Winged head left wearing torc, ATEVLA before, dotted circle

REV: Horned bull to the right with beaded ‘mane’ and spikey tail; S-scroll above; quaterfoil below; VLATOS before, grain ear below exergual line

DLT 7191 has a pentagram below the horse and a crescent below the exergual line.

Kernos
(http://druidry.org/board/images/smiles/icon_zen.gif)



Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: Cleisthenes on February 02, 2007, 06:38:43 pm
Kernos,

That coin is a beauty.  I'm posting the photo of a coin (once again, not in my collection :-\) that is very intriguing:

Danubian Celts, Burgenland region, AR tetradrachm, imitation of Philip II of Macedon, alterated Kroisbach type, ca. 100-50 BC, 12.45gm, 25.5mm.  Obv: Celticized male head to right with triple pearl diadem, prominent features, broken nose, and radically altered facial features (from the normal for the Kroisbach type) produced by two strikes.  Rev: Diademed horseman and prancing horse to left, horseman depicted as bust only, with hair in topknot and three trailing curls.  Cf. Göbl OTA 469/2 (single strike); cf. Lanz 743 (single strike).  EF

It is difficult to believe that the obverse device on this tetradrachm is the product of an accidental double strike.  We can determine from the striking method that must have been employed to produce the effect that the image was almost certainly the intended result of two deliberate, careful strikes.  The first strike produced a strong impression of the top half of the obverse image, and the second strike was done with the die tilted such that it produced a strong impression of the bottom half of the obverse face without interfering with the impression left by the first strike.  In addition, the second strike was done with the die rotated and placed in such a way that the back of the head was left with a natural appearance.  Also, while the flan was rotated and tilted rather radically with respect to the obverse die between the two strikes (much more so than is found in a normal accidental double strike) to produce the effects just noted, the reverse die was kept in nearly an identical position with respect to the flan during the two strikes, producing little evidence of the two strikes on the reverse image.  Finally, both the obverse and reverse devices are very well-centered on the unusual oblong flan, with the obverse image fitting the size of the flan quite well, and the reverse image positioned to take best advantage of the shape of the flan.

Certainly the highly creative Celtic celators must have experimented with new design ideas, and this may be an example of such an experiment.  It may also be the result of a coin production team's creative attempt to deal with an oblong flan or group of oblong flans with which they were presented
.

Jim
 


Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: leetoone on April 07, 2007, 09:42:43 am
  In addition, the second strike was done with the die rotated and placed in such a way that the back of the head was left with a natural appearance.  Also, while the flan was rotated and tilted rather radically with respect to the obverse die between the two strikes (much more so than is found in a normal accidental double strike) to produce the effects just noted, the reverse die was kept in nearly an identical position with respect to the flan during the two strikes, producing little evidence of the two strikes on the reverse image. 

Could it be that the coin flan simply got stuck in the upper die after having been struck and an afterstrike, albeit a little rotated, caused a double strike on the obverse that would not have occurred on the reverse?


Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: Cleisthenes on April 30, 2007, 03:12:54 am
Hi Lee,

Your suggestion is very reasonable (and it would certainly suit "Ockham's Razor -- lex parsimoniae").  Maybe I'm giving the celator too much credit ;).

Cheers, Jim


Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: Kernos on July 19, 2007, 09:16:15 am
The Cunobelinos AV stater is common but also very popular. They go from $400 to $2000 depending on condition and particular type.

The ATEVLA AR unit is $800-900 mainly because of its superior condition and large flan.

The East Celt TD is much more difficult. It is in superior condition ($2000++), the flaw is a plus or minus depending on one's ideas about such things. If I had the money I would certainly give US$2K for it. It would be intrestin gto see how it did in a major auction.

As in all coins, condition in Celtic coins is everything and gold just keeps increasing in price. Personally I like bronze best and silver next. IMO, nothing beats a beautiful AE

Bill


Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: Kernos on December 26, 2007, 10:10:49 am
Here is another example of the Jugate BIATEC hexadrachm:

(http://kernunnos.com/images/biatec_jugate.jpg)

Jugate heads right, one laureate, the other helmeted, vine leaves in field, scalloped border

Naked male on horseback right holding branch and shield, vines in field, BIATEC below exergual line, scalloped border

Kostial 62; Göbl, Gross Boier plate 2 II/I; de la Tour cf. 10170

Supposedly this obverse of this coin is copied from a denarius of Q. Fufius Kalenus and Mucius Cordus,  70 BCE, RSC Fufia 1, Craw 403/1, Syd 797) and the head representing Honos and Virtua or Apollo and Mars. They are NOT the Dioscuri, so not related to Cordia 1 as some have suggested.

The vines in the fieldsremind me of stylistically of the vines on the Gundestrup Cauldron making me wonder if these are Dacian or Thracian rather than Celtic. I wonder if there is any modern data about this series.

I have always wanted a DEVIL multi-drachm (or a decent picture), but have never seen one for sale!

Happy Holidays,

Bill Blank


Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: gallienus1 on January 04, 2008, 05:54:57 am

A Celtic coin OTD thread is a great idea. Here is one of mine, a base silver stater from the Channel Islands. I know these are supposed to be fairly common, but you don’t see them for sale all that often (there seems to be only one available in the V Coins Mall currently) Years ago, the dealer told me it was “similar to Sear 110”. Unfortunately, the relief is so high it won’t scan that well so I had to really hit the “sharpen” button a few times to try and do it justice.

Steve


Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: ROMA on February 03, 2008, 04:56:27 am
I came across this one, pretty neat!

CELTIC, Middle Danube. Uncertain tribe. Late 2nd-early 1st century BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 12.47 g, 10h). Variety of Reiterstumpf/Kroisbach type. Male head (Apollo?) left / Rider on horseback left, showing only his torso; torque-like ground line below. Gorny & Mosch 141 (10 October 2005), lot 22 (same dies); Gemini IV, lot 10 (same dies); otherwise unpublished. Superb EF, toned. Fully centered. Very rare.
This coin is from a newly discovered type clearly related to the Reiterstumpf/Kroisbach type by virtue of the close similarity of their reverse types, as well as the overall style and characteristics of their flans. The obverse type has a stylistic affinity with the left-facing male heads on the Apollokopf/Leierblume type, particularly in the details of the face and jaw line (cf. Göbl, OTA 396-398). Both the Reiterstumpf and Apollokopf types are attributed to the same general region and time frame, so a new type combining elements of both is not unexpected.


Title: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: helvetica on April 15, 2015, 09:01:43 am
This absolutely has to be the Celtic coin of the day. We have probably all come across
these Danubian Thasos imitations at some time or another. I was just IDing such a
coin checking through the examples I had sent to Dave Surber before I inherited
the reins of wildwinds from him and noticed this one:
Celtic Danube Region. AR Tetradrachm imitating Thasos. ca 1st C. BC. 34.5mm, 15.68 g.
Obv: Head of Dionysos left, wearing ivy wreath, style completely
degraded, locks of hair resembling short legs.
Rev: Legend degraded to LSIIVL LISIIS, greatly degraded image
of Herakles (resembling a parrot or eagle!), head left, wing-like arms, club beside leg.
Göbl, OTA Class IV. cf Lukanc 1347. Bank Leu, 79, 188.

What a wonderful image. I had to laugh.


Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: quadrans on April 15, 2015, 01:38:05 pm
Hi Dane ,
 Very nice ..
 Q.

p.s.

I have some in my Celtic coin Gallery:

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=4020

Q.


Title: Re: Celtic Coin of the Day
Post by: Joe Sermarini on May 12, 2016, 03:48:25 am
Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Barbaric Imitative
(http://www.forumancientcoins.com/Coins2/90412q00.jpg)
Tribal peoples outside the Empire struck coinage imitative of Roman types beginning in the second century B.C. and continued to strike imitative types even after the Western Empire ceased to exist. Several official issues used this reverse type, but the style is exotic and crude. These legends were never used on any official issues.

RS90412. Silver denarius, for possible prototype: cf. RIC IV 497a, RSC III 642 (Roman official, Laodicea ad Mare mint, 198 A.D.), VF, double struck, reverse off center, unofficial mint, weight 2.603g, maximum diameter 18.1mm, die axis 180o, obverse [...] CAE L SEP SEV PERP IWC (or similar, blundered), laureate head right; reverse [...]TAS AVG P P (blundered, S reversed), Salus seated left, with patera in her right hand feeding snake rising from altar at her feet, cornucopia in left; $120.00

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=800 (http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=800)