Allison Sermarini's Maps of the Ancient World
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01PlataeaBattle.gif
Map - Battle of Plataea, Boeotia, Summer of 479 B.C.206 viewsMap - Battle of Plataea, Boiotia, Summer of 479 B.C.
02IssusApproach.gif
Map - Battle of Issus - Approach221 views
03GranicusBattle.gif
Map - Battle of Granicus, 334 B.C.176 views
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Map - 40 B.C. During the Peace of the Second Triumvirate of Marcus Antonius, Octavian and Lepidus219 viewsMap - 40 B.C. During the Peace of the Second Triumvirate of Marcus Antonius, Octavian and Lepidus
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Map - Roman Expansion 326 B.C.261 viewsMap - Roman Expansion 326 B.C.
08RomanControlItaly.gif
Map - Roman Control: Italy, 1st Century B.C.350 viewsMap - Roman Control: Italy, 1st Century B.C.
09RomeExpansion2CentBC.gif
Map - Roman Expansion: Mediterranean Basin 2nd Century B.C.309 viewsMap - Roman Expansion: Mediterranean Basin 2nd Century B.C.
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Map of Ancient Rome 271 AD527 viewsMap of the Roman Empire around the year of the consulship of Aurelianus and Bassus (271 AD), with the break away Gallic Empire in the West and the Palmyrene Empire in the East.
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Map - AD 117 Roman Empire595 viewsAD 117 Roman Empire
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Map - AD 117 Roman Dominions in the Time of Trajan985 views
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Map - 89 BC Eastern Mediterranean793 viewsA map of the Middle East, Greece and Asia Minor, showing the states at the breakout of the first Mithridatic War, 89 B.C.
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Map - AD 69 The Roman Civil War981 viewsMap of the Roman Empire during 69 AD, the Year of the Four Emperors. Colored areas indicate provinces loyal to one of four warring generals.
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Map - 218 BC Mediterranean674 views
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Map - AD 217 Imperial Rome with Aurelian Walls637 views
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Map - 44 BC Roman Dominions at the Death of Julius Caesar774 views
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Map - 27 BC - 337 AD Italy: Augustus to Constantine I 668 views
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Map - Roman Asia Minor581 views
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Map - The Growth of Roman Power in Asia Minor537 views
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Map - The Battle of Cannae 215 BC383 viewsThe Romans, hoping to gain success through sheer strength and weight of numbers, raised a new army of unprecedented size, estimated by some to be as large as 100,000 men, but more likely around 50-80,000. Resolved to confront Hannibal, they marched southward to Apulia. They eventually found Hannibal on the left bank of the Aufidus River, and encamped six miles (10 km) away. On this occasion, the two armies were combined into one, the consuls having to alternate their command on a daily basis. Varro, who was in command on the first day, was a man of reckless and hubristic nature, and was determined to defeat Hannibal. Hannibal capitalized on the eagerness of Varro and drew him into a trap by using an envelopment tactic, which eliminated the Roman numerical advantage by shrinking the combat area. Hannibal drew up his least reliable infantry in a semicircle in the center with the wings composed of the Gallic and Numidian horse. The Roman legions forced their way through Hannibal's weak center, but the Libyan mercenaries on the wings, swung around by the movement, menaced their flanks. The onslaught of Hannibal's cavalry was irresistible, and Maharbal, Hannibal's chief cavalry commander, who led the mobile Numidian cavalry on the right, shattered the Roman cavalry opposing them. Hannibal's Iberian and Gallic heavy cavalry, led by Hanno on the left, defeated the Roman heavy cavalry, and then both the Carthaginian heavy cavalry and the Numidians attacked the legions from behind. As a result, the Roman army was hemmed in with no means of escape. Due to these brilliant tactics, Hannibal, with much inferior numbers, managed to surround and destroy all but a small remnant of his enemy. Depending upon the source, it is estimated that 50,000-70,000 Romans were killed or captured. Among the dead were the Roman Consul Lucius Aemilius Paullus, as well as two consuls for the preceding year, two quaestors, twenty-nine out of the forty-eight military tribunes and an additional eighty senators (at a time when the Roman Senate comprised no more than 300 men, this constituted 25%–30% of the governing body). This makes the battle one of the most catastrophic defeats in the history of Ancient Rome, and one of the bloodiest battles in all of human history (in terms of the number of lives lost within a single day). After Cannae, the Romans were very hesitant to confront Hannibal in pitched battle, preferring instead to weaken him by attrition, relying on their advantages of interior lines, supply, and manpower. As a result, Hannibal fought no more major battles in Italy for the rest of the war.
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Map - 217 BC Battle of Lake Trasimene389 viewsArriving in Etruria in the spring of 217 BC, Hannibal decided to lure the main Roman army under Flaminius, into a pitched battle, by devastating the region Flaminius had been sent to protect. As Polybius recounts, "he [Hannibal] calculated that, if he passed the camp and made a descent into the district beyond, Flaminius (partly for fear of popular reproach and partly of personal irritation) would be unable to endure watching passively the devastation of the country but would spontaneously follow him . . . and give him opportunities for attack." At the same time, Hannibal tried to break the allegiance of Rome’s allies by proving that Flaminius was powerless to protect them. Despite this, Flaminius remained passively encamped at Arretium. Unable to draw Flaminius into battle by mere devastation, Hannibal marched boldly around his opponent’s left flank and effectively cut Flaminius off from Rome (thus executing the first recorded turning movement in military history). Advancing through the uplands of Etruria, Hannibal provoked Flaminius into a hasty pursuit and, catching him in a defile on the shore of Lake Trasimenus, destroyed his army in the waters or on the adjoining slopes, killing Flaminius as well (see Battle of Lake Trasimene). This was the most costly ambush the Romans would ever sustain until the Battle of Carrhae against the Parthians. He had now disposed of the only field force that could check his advance upon Rome, but, realizing that without siege engines, he could not hope to take the capital, he preferred to exploit his victory by entering into central and southern Italy and encouraging a general revolt against the sovereign power.
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Map - 218 BC The Battle of Trebia 435 viewsHannibal demonstrated his masterful military skill at Trebia; where after wearing down the superior Roman infantry he then cut it to pieces with a surprise attack and ambush from the flanks.
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Map - AD 395 Roman Empire343 views
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Map - Map of the world According to Strabo321 views
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Map - Caesar's Gaul before 58 B.C. (Italian)377 viewsThe Roman world in 58 BC, before Gallia's conquest by Caesar. (Note: Map doesn't show subordinate Roman client kingdoms in Anatolia and the Levant.)
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Map - AD 383–410, End of Roman Rule in Britain350 views
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Map - Extent of the Roman Empire469 views
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Map - 264 BC First Punic War309 views
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Map - Hadrian's Wall213 views
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Map - Hannibal's route of invasion307 viewsThe Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siegecraft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.
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Map - AD 350 City of Rome497 views1 comments
Maps_to_Illustrate_the_Punic_Wars.jpg
Map - The Punic Wars239 views
map_of_barbarian_migrations.jpg
Map - Barbarian Migrations357 views
Map_of_Europe_according_to_Strabo.jpg
Map - Map of Europe according to Strabo267 views
Map_Roman_Empire_at_its_Height_2400pix.jpg
Map - AD 117 Roman Empire at its Height371 views
Map_Spread_of_Christianity.jpg
Map - The Spread of Christianity 300 - 800 A.D.207 viewsMap - The Spread of Christianity 300 - 800 A.D.
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Map - Orbis Veteribus Notus304 views
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Map - AD 318-379 Roman Praetorian Prefecture of Illyricum 218 views
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Map - 40 BC City of Rome341 viewsPlan of Republican Rome
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Map - Republican Forum377 views
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Map - 30 BC Republican Rome346 views
Roman_Empire_125.png
Map - AD 125 Roman Empire under Hadrian446 views
roman_empire_395.jpg
Map - AD 395 The Roman Empire401 views
Roman_empire_395~1.jpg
Map - AD 395 Roman Empire273 views
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Map - Animated gif Showing Expansion and Contraction of Roman Empire338 viewsTo view the animation click on the image. It will open in a new window, and the animation will start.
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Map - Map of the Roman Empire with main harbors and fleets from Augustus to Septimius Severus475 views
Roma_Plan.jpg
Map - Map of Rome during Antiquity319 views
Rome_and_Carthage_218_BC.png
Map - Rome and Carthage at the start of the Second Punic War 218 BC 269 viewsThe Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siegecraft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and, in Iberia, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.
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Map - 218 BC Rome and Carthage334 views
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Map - 264 BC - 180 AD - Roman Expansion - Punic War to Marcus Aurelius309 views
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Map - AD 300 - 476 Major Mint Cities of the Roman Empire353 viewsIn addition to the above locations, several other cities hosted mint operations during brief periods. Sometimes an emperor on a war campaign chose to bring along these facilities to ensure a close eye on the soldiers‟ payroll. A partial list of minor mints includes:

Ambianum – Amiens, France
Barcino – Barcelona, Spain
Carnuntum – near Vienna, Austria
Colonia Agrippinensis – Cologne, Germany
Laodiceia ad Mare – Laodikeia, Syria
Ostia – near Rome, Italy
Palmyra – near Tadmur, Syria
Narbo Martius – Narbonne, France
Tarraco – Tarragona, Spain
Tripolis – Tripolis, Turkey
Viminacium – Kostolac, Yugoslavia
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Map - Rise of Roman Power in Italy283 views
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Map - 100 BC The Growth of Roman Power in Italy196 viewsMap of the Roman confederation in 100 BC, on the eve of the Social War. Note the patchwork political configuration. The Roman possessions (in grey-blue) straddle the strategic centre of the Italian peninsula and the Tyrrhenian coastal plain. Latin colonies (dark red) are scattered in strategic locations. Other socii (pink) are concentrated in the mountainous interior.
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Map - The Wars with Mithridates247 views
The_Roman_Empire.jpg
Map - The Roman Empire: Fourth Century303 views
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Map - Trajan's Rome416 views
 
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