Allison Sermarini's Maps of the Ancient World
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Home > Chronological

Pre-Classical


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15 maps, last one added on Oct 22, 2014

Classical


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13 maps, last one added on Jun 10, 2018

Hellenistic


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26 maps, last one added on Feb 22, 2018

Roman


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61 maps, last one added on Jan 06, 2019

Medieval and Later


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86 maps, last one added on Apr 13, 2019

 

5 atlases on 1 page(s)

Random maps - Chronological
GOUGH_KAART_(HOGE_RESOLUTIE).JPG
Map - 1355 - 1366 AD The Gough Map of Britain358 viewsThe Gough Map or Bodleian Map is a map of Great Britain, dating between 1355 and 1366, and is the oldest surviving route map of Great Britain. Its precise date of production and authorship are unknown. It is named after Richard Gough, who donated the map to the Bodleian Library in 1809.
Dating of the map has been undertaken based on historical changes of place names and sizes. Gough believed the map to date from the reign of Edward III, but 19th-century scholarship suggested that it dated from c.1300, during the reign of Edward I. The map is now generally believed to have been made within an eleven-year window, due to the ability to date some of its features. The earliest given date is deduced by the depiction of a city wall around Coventry, which was first constructed in 1355. The latter date is usually given as 1366, the year in which the town marked on the map as Sheppey was renamed Queenborough. Lexicographic evidence also suggests that it dates from the latter half of the 14th century. It is, however, believed that the map is based on an earlier version, made around 1280.

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Map - Caesar's Gaul before 58 B.C. (Italian)561 viewsThe Roman world in 58 BC, before Gallia's conquest by Caesar. (Note: Map doesn't show subordinate Roman client kingdoms in Anatolia and the Levant.)
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Map - Roman Asia Minor815 views
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Map - 100 BC The Growth of Roman Power in Italy365 viewsMap of the Roman confederation in 100 BC, on the eve of the Social War. Note the patchwork political configuration. The Roman possessions (in grey-blue) straddle the strategic centre of the Italian peninsula and the Tyrrhenian coastal plain. Latin colonies (dark red) are scattered in strategic locations. Other socii (pink) are concentrated in the mountainous interior.
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Map - 1560 AD Europe and the Mediterranean351 views
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Map - 1550 AD Europe and the Mediterranean360 views
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MAP - 555 AD - Byzantine Empire Under Justinian408 viewsThe Eastern Roman Empire (red) and its vassals (pink) in 555 AD during the reign of Justinian I.
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Map - Spread of Christianity301 views

Last additions - Chronological
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Map 526 AD Europe at the Death of Theoderic the Great3 viewsThird map (of four) from plate 19 of Professor G. Droysen's Allgemeiner Historischer Handatlas, published by R. Andrée. Plate is titled "Europa zur Zeit der Völkerwanderung". This map is titled "Europa beim Tode Theoderichs d. Gr. (526)Apr 13, 2019
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Map - Greek and Latin states in southern Greece, c. 121015 viewsPolitical map of southern Greece in c. 1210, after the establishment of the Crusader states following the Fourth Crusade.

After Constantinople was conquered during the Fourth Crusade in 1204, Greece was divided among the Crusaders. The Latin Empire held Constantinople and Thrace, while Greece itself was divided into the Kingdom of Thessalonica, the Principality of Achaea, and the Duchy of Athens. The Venetians controlled the Duchy of the Archipelago in the Aegean, and the Despotate of Epirus was established as one of the three Byzantine Greek successor states. Michael VIII restored the empire in 1261, having also regained the Kingdom of Thessalonica. By his death in 1282, Michael had taken back the Aegean islands, Thessaly, Epirus, and most of Achaea, including the Crusader fortress of Mystras, which became the seat of a Byzantine despotate. However, Athens and the northern Peloponnese remained in Crusader hands. With the exception of the Ionian Islands and some isolated forts which remained in Venetian hands until the turn of the 19th century, the final end of the Frankokratia in the Greek lands came with the Ottoman conquest, chiefly in the 14th to 16th centuries.
Mar 14, 2019
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Map 1214 The Latin Empire11 viewsThe borders of the Latin Empire and Byzantine Empire after the 4th crusade (1204) up to the Treaty of Nymphaeum in 1214. Mar 13, 2019
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Map - German States, Brandenburg, 1320 A.D.15 viewsMap - German States, Brandenburg, 1320 A.D.Feb 17, 2019
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Map 450 A.D. - Attila and the Roman Empire30 viewsEmpire of Attila and the Roman Empire around 450 AD. Settlement area of Germanic tribes within the Imperium Roman are marked, controlled areas are in color.Jan 06, 2019
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Map 300 A.D. - The Tetrarchy28 viewsMap of the Roman Empire under the tetrarchy, showing the dioceses and the four tetrarchs' zones of influence post 299 after Diocletian and Galerius had exchanged their allocated provinces.Dec 21, 2018
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Map - Kingdom of Northumbria 802 AD29 viewsKingdom of Northumbria 802 AD

The Kingdom of Northumbria was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber", which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory, the Humber Estuary. Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century. At its height, the kingdom extended from just south of the Humber to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth, in Scotland. Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century.
Dec 16, 2018
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1204 AD The Latin Empire and Partition of the Byzantine Empire after the 4th Crusade, c. 1204.45 viewsThe Latin Empire and the Partition of the Byzantine Empire after the 4th crusade, c. 1204; borders are approximate.Nov 10, 2018