Allison Sermarini's Maps of the Ancient World
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Maps - yet another Forum Ancient Coins' Service for collectors! Part of our effort to be Your Favorite Ancient Coin Shop. Allison Sermarini is studying classics at UNCG. Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Part of our effort to be Your Favorite Ancient Coin Shop. We hope these maps enhance ancient coin collecting for you. Please don't forget to visit our shop today!

Maps Home | Add a Map | Last Added | Last Comments | Favorite Maps | Search Maps
Home > Chronological

Pre-Classical


Ancient_Empires_of_the_East~2.jpg

15 maps, last one added on Oct 22, 2014

Classical


Persian_Empire_1612x1126.jpg

12 maps, last one added on Mar 23, 2016

Hellenistic


Empires_Persia_and_Alexander~1.jpg

24 maps, last one added on Nov 06, 2017

Roman


Trajan__s_Rome.jpg

58 maps, last one added on Jan 20, 2018

Medieval and Later


Italy_1000_AD.png

79 maps, last one added on Aug 18, 2017

 

5 atlases on 1 page(s)

Random maps - Chronological
GOUGH_KAART_(HOGE_RESOLUTIE).JPG
Map - 1355 - 1366 AD The Gough Map of Britain308 viewsThe Gough Map or Bodleian Map is a map of Great Britain, dating between 1355 and 1366, and is the oldest surviving route map of Great Britain. Its precise date of production and authorship are unknown. It is named after Richard Gough, who donated the map to the Bodleian Library in 1809.
Dating of the map has been undertaken based on historical changes of place names and sizes. Gough believed the map to date from the reign of Edward III, but 19th-century scholarship suggested that it dated from c.1300, during the reign of Edward I. The map is now generally believed to have been made within an eleven-year window, due to the ability to date some of its features. The earliest given date is deduced by the depiction of a city wall around Coventry, which was first constructed in 1355. The latter date is usually given as 1366, the year in which the town marked on the map as Sheppey was renamed Queenborough. Lexicographic evidence also suggests that it dates from the latter half of the 14th century. It is, however, believed that the map is based on an earlier version, made around 1280.

CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Diadoch.png
Map - 301 B.C. Hellenistic Kingdoms before the Battle of Ipsus642 views
1000px-Map_of_Ancient_Rome_271_AD_svg.png
Map of Ancient Rome 271 AD766 viewsMap of the Roman Empire around the year of the consulship of Aurelianus and Bassus (271 AD), with the break away Gallic Empire in the West and the Palmyrene Empire in the East.
Europe_-50.png
The Roman world in 50 BC after Caesar's conquest of Gallia80 viewsThe Roman world in 50 BC after Caesar's conquest of Gallia. (Note: Map doesn't show subordinate Roman client kingdoms in Anatolia and the Levant.)
AncientRome-10~0.jpg
Map - AD 217 Imperial Rome with Aurelian Walls815 views
europe_mediterranean_1190~0.jpg
Map - 1190 AD Europe and the Mediterranean305 views
Roman_Empire_125.png
Map - AD 125 Roman Empire under Hadrian526 views
rome_carthage_2182~0.jpg
Map - 218 BC Rome and Carthage388 views

Last additions - Chronological
Litus_Saxonicum~0.png
The Late Roman fortifications of the “Saxon Shore” (litus Saxonicum) in Britain and northern France.31 viewsThe Late Roman fortifications of the “Saxon Shore” (litus Saxonicum) in Britain and northern France.

The Saxon Shore (Latin: litus Saxonicum) was a military command of the late Roman Empire, consisting of a series of fortifications on both sides of the English Channel. It was established in the late 3rd century and was led by the "Count of the Saxon Shore". In the late 4th century, his functions were limited to Britain, while the fortifications in Gaul were established as separate commands. Several Saxon Shore forts survive in east and south-east England.
Jan 20, 2018
Europe_-50.png
The Roman world in 50 BC after Caesar's conquest of Gallia80 viewsThe Roman world in 50 BC after Caesar's conquest of Gallia. (Note: Map doesn't show subordinate Roman client kingdoms in Anatolia and the Levant.)Nov 18, 2017
Macedonia_and_the_Aegean_World_c_200.png
Macedonia and the Aegean world c.200 B.C.71 viewsMacedonia and the Aegean world c.200 B.C.Nov 06, 2017
Roman_East_50_CE_Commagene_highlighted-en_svg.png
Roman East 50 A.D.82 viewsCommagene (highlighted), Sophene, Osrhoene, Armenia, and parts of the Parthian and Roman Empires, as they would have been in 50 CE.Nov 01, 2017
Sassanian_Empire_621_A_D.jpg
Sassanian Empire 621 A.D.169 viewsThe Sasanian Persian Empire at its greatest extent, 621 A.D.Aug 18, 2017
hecataeus.jpg
19th Century Reconstruction of Hecataeus' Map of the World210 viewsHecataeus of Miletus was an early Greek historian and geographer. He is believed to have written the first book on geography in 500 BC. He believed that the earth was a flat disk surrounded by the ocean. Jun 19, 2017
eratosthenes.jpg
1883 Reconstruction of Eratosthenes’ map170 viewsEratosthenes of Cyrene (276-194 BCE) invented the discipline of geography and the terminology used today. His map incorporates the information from Alexander the Great's campaigns. Eratosthenes was also the first geographer to incorporate parallels and meridians in his cartographic depictions.Jun 19, 2017
posidonius1.jpg
A 1628 Reconstruction of Posidonius Ideas about the Position of Continents.203 viewsPosidonius of Apameia (c. 135–51 BCE) was a Greek Stoic philosopher that showed how the forces effected one another and also human life. He measured the Earth's circumference by using the star Canopus. He measured 240,000 stadia (24,000 miles) which is close to the actual circumference of 24,901 miles.Jun 19, 2017